Events


UNITED KINGDOM
CAMBRIDGE
Degas: A passion for perfection

The Fitzwilliam's collection of paintings, drawings, etchings, pastels, monotypes and sculptures in bronze and wax, counterproofs, and letters by Degas – the most extensive and representative in the UK – will be put on display to mark the centenary of the artist's death on 27 September 1917. Exploring how Degas experimented with techniques, repeatedly reworked compositions and poses, and drew inspiration from Old Masters and Classical antiquity, the exhibition has sculptures of dancers, charcoal drawings of female bathers, and scenes of café life. Among the works on show are a group of drawings from King's College Cambridge, bequeathed in 1946 by John Maynard Keynes, who bought them in 1918 and 1919 from Degas' posthumous studio sales in Paris.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 3 October 2017 to
14 January 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Sampled Lives: Samplers from the Fitzwilliam Museum

More than 100 embroidered and stitched samplers offer a rare glimpse into the lives of ordinary young women in the past. The pieces, whose makers range in date from mid-17th-century English Quakers to early 20th-century school pupils, give an insight into education, employment, family, status and needlework skills.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 8 April 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Another India: Explorations and Expressions of Indigenous South Asia

Marking the 70th anniversary of India's independence from Britain and the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, this exhibition presents more than 100 artefacts, paintings and photographs from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology collections (some on show for the first time) along with work by contemporary artists in an exploration of the diverse minority populations of India. Together, the pieces on display tell the story of colonialism, British involvement in the subcontinent, and collecting.
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
+44 (0)1223 333516
(maa.cam.ac.uk)
Until 22 April 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Elephants, Deities and Ashoka's Pillar: Coins of India from Antiquity to the Present

Celebrating 70 years of Indian independence, this exhibition uses coins and banknotes (from the Fitzwilliam's numismatic collections) to chart cultural, religious, economic, and political developments in India from the
4th century BC to the 20th century.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 1 October 2017.

CHATSWORTH, Derbyshire
House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth

Stunning pieces from the Devonshire Collection – including paintings, garments, jewellery, archival material, designs and textiles – are used to explore the history of dress. They offer an insight into the style of notable figures, such as Bess of Hardwick, Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, Adele Astaire, Deborah Devonshire and Nancy Mitford. The work of designers like Christian Dior, Gucci, Erdem and Alexander McQueen appear alongside livery, uniforms, coronation robes and fancy-dress costumes. Rare theatre costume designs from the 1660s, made by Inigo Jones, are also on show.
Chatsworth
+44 (0)1246 565300
(www.chatsworth.org)
Until 22 October 2017.

CHESTER
ARK
The interior of Chester cathedral

and the historic spaces around it provide a splendid backdrop for
90 sculptures by more than 50 artists. Works in bronze, silver, concrete, marble, wood, steel, aluminium, limestone, granite, copper, leaves, resin, acrylic, tin and hair range in size from 5cm to 11.6m. Among the artists featured are Damien Hirst, Antony Gormley, Lynn Chadwick, Barbara Hepworth, Sarah Lucas, Elisabeth Frink and Eduardo Paolozzi.
Chester Cathedral
+44 (0)1244 324756
(www.chestercathedral.com)
Until 15 October 2017.



EDINBURGH
Constable and McTaggart

John Constable's impact on Scottish landscape painter William McTaggart (1835–1910) is examined in this display, which includes Constable's monumental Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows, 1831 (above) and McTaggart's The Storm, 1890. McTaggart saw Constable's paintings a number of times during the 19th century, but his style changed in the 1880s when 118 works by Constable were on display in Edinburgh. Constable's influence can be seen in The Storm – in the scale of the painting, the depiction of the approaching storm, and in the use of
a variety of brush strokes.
Scottish National Gallery
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 25 March 2018.

EDINBURGH
True to Life: British Realist Painting in the 1920s and 1930s

Abstract art became popular after the Second World War and soon overtook the Realist tradition that flourished in Britain between the wars. This exhibition brings together the remarkably life-like paintings of more than 50 technically accomplished Realist artists, including Meredith Frampton, Laura Knight and Gerald Leslie Brockhurst whose By the Hills, 1939, is shown above.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 29 October 2017.


EDINBURGH
Looking Good: The Male Gaze from Van Dyck to Lucian Freud

Sir Anthony Van Dyck's final Self-Portrait, circa 1640 (above) visits the Scottish National Portrait Gallery – the only Scottish venue on the painting's tour following its acquisition for the nation in 2014 – and joins other works that put the male image, identity and appearance under the spotlight. This exhibition, which brings together portraits, from the 16th century to today, charts courtiers' hairstyles, the rise of celebrity, interest in male beauty and personal grooming and representations of gender and sexuality.
Scottish National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 1 October 2017.

EDINBURGH
Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites

Love, loss, exile, rebellion and retribution all play a part in this exhibition that tells the real story of a turbulent period in European history, the rise and fall of the Jacobites and Charles Edward Stuart (better known as Bonnie Prince Charlie), which still carries with it a number of misconceptions. He landed on the Isle of Eriskay in
1745, and was the Jacobite Stuarts' last hope of regaining the crown of England, Scotland and Ireland, after his grandfather James VII (of Scotland) and II (of England) was deposed and replaced by James' Protestant daughter Mary and her husband William of Orange. But Charles was ultimately defeated in the Battle of Culloden. Many historic artefacts from Scottish collections and from across the UK and France, including spectacular objects given to Bonnie Prince Charlie, like this dress targe, a circular shield (above) presented to him by James, 3rd Duke of Perth, circa 1740, shed light on the Jacobites and their campaigns.
National Museum of Scotland
+44 (0)300 123 6789
(www.nms.ac.uk)
From 23 June to 12 November 2017.


LIVERPOOL
Portraying a Nation: Germany 1919–1933

The works of two artists, painter Otto Dix and photographer August Sander, are being exhibited for the first time, side by side, charting the Weimar Republic and Germany during the interwar years. More than 300 paintings, drawings, prints and photographs are displayed in two exhibitions, Otto Dix: The Evil Eye and ARTIST ROOMS: August Sander. Their work reflects the experimentation and innovation in visual arts during this pivotal period in Germany's history and also both artists' preoccupation with representing the extremes of society. Otto Dix's harsh portrayals of German society – including his Reclining Woman on a Leopard Skin, 1927 (above) – and the brutality of war, mainly produced in Düsseldorf between 1922 and 1925, when he became a leading New Objectivity painter, are complemented by August Sander's expansive series People of the Twentieth Century. Together they offer a collective portrait of a nation.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)151 702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 23 June to 15 October 2017.

LONDON
Buildings That Fill My Eye: Architectural Heritage of Yemen

Celebrating the diversity of Yemen's rich and colourful architecture, this exhibition considers the array of building styles and traditions that have developed through time, starting with the ancient cities and World Heritage sites, Shiban, Sanaa and Zabid. Builders have helped to establish close-knit communities with distinct cultural identities, dealing with challenging terrains, and responding to conflict through the creation of forts and fortifications, and characteristic tall houses with no windows on
the ground floor.
Brunei Galley, SOAS
+44 (0)20 7898 4915
(www.soas.ac.uk/gallery)
Until 23 September 2017.


LONDON
Royal Gifts
During this year's annual summer opening of Buckingham Palace (the 25th), more than 200 gifts presented to the Queen throughout her long reign will be displayed in the State Rooms. These official gifts often represent the artistic traditions or local craftsmanship of the countries she visted. They include: a carved totem-pole, presented by Mayor Frank J Ney of Nainaimo, British Columbia; a paperweight, made from a fossilised dinosaur bone and given to her Majesty during an official visit to Canada in 1971; and also a gold octagonal box (above) presented by the Sultan of Brunei during her State Visit to the wealthy sovereign state in 1972. All the gifts offer an insight into the Queen's role and relationship with the local people from over 100 different countries.
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7300
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
Until 1 October 2017.

LONDON
Trauma
As part of the Londinium Festival – a celebration of Roman London (for further details see page 61) – a Roman skull (above) believed to be that of a gladiator is on view at the city's Roman amphitheatre. Found during excavations in the Walbrook Stream, the skull, which dates to circa AD 150, shows signs of substantial head trauma around the time of death. Curated by the Museum of London, the exhibition also looks at representations of gladiators in Londinium and the lives of those who came to the amphitheatre to spectate or compete.
Guildhall Art Gallery
+44 (0)20 7332 3700
(www.cityoflondon.gov.uk)
Until 29 October 2017.

LONDON
Drawn in Colour: Degas from the Burrell

Another exhibition commemorating the centenary of Degas' death, this show presents a group of works by the artist from the Burrell Collection in Glasgow alongside others from the National Galley and other collections. Sir William Burrell (1861–1958), a shipping magnate, collected a large number of Degas pastels from throughout his career that illustrate some of the artist's favourite subjects. The Green Ballet Skirt, circa 1896 (above), shows his love of ballet, while pictures of horse-racing and private scenes of women at their toilette also appealed to him. Degas turned to pastel when his eyesight began to fail, and bold colours became important in contemporary art. Most of these pictures have not been seen outside Glasgow since they were brought here in the early 20th century.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 20 September 2017 to
7 May 2018.


LONDON
Reflections: Van Eyck and the Pre-Raphaelites

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood admired Van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait, 1434, acquired by the National Gallery in 1842, and this painting shaped their views on draughtsmanship, colour, technique and the symbolic meanings of objects. For the first time, the 15th-century masterpiece will be shown alongside works that it inspired, by Rossetti, Millais and Holman Hunt. A variety of responses to Van Eyck's great work can be seen, particularly in the representation of domestic scenes and the use of convex mirrors to depict real and illusory spaces, as in Simeon Solomon's A Youth Relating Tales to Ladies, 1870 (above).
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 2 October 2017 to
2 April 2018.

LONDON
Dalí/Duchamp
Two highly original artists Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968) and Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) met in the 1930s and remained friends until Duchamp's death. As well as looking at the personal links between the two Surrealists, this exhibition examines their aesthetic and philosophical connections through more than 80 works, including of Duchamp's masterpiece, The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915 (Richard Hamilton's 1965–6/85 reconstruction, is shown above). Duchamp's 'readymades', notably a 1964 replica of his iconic urinal, which he called Fountain, 1917, and Dalí's iconic Lobster Telephone, 1938, are also on show, as well as paintings, sculpture and archival material – all imaginative pieces exploring how the two artists treated the body and the object, with subjects as divers as time and space, energy, gravity and quantum theory.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 7 October 2017 to
3 January 2018.

LONDON
Second Nature: The Art of Charles Tunnicliffe RA
The work of celebrated 20th-century wildlife artist, printmaker, and book illustrator, Charles Tunnicliffe (1901–79), takes centre stage in this exhibition. His naturalistic depictions of birds, such as a charming watercolour depicting a gaggle of geese and entitled Solway Company, 1944 (above), and other wild creatures stemmed from close observation, but they were always shown as a living part of the environment, not simply as specimens. Tunnicliffe, who grew up on a farm in Cheshire before moving to Anglesey, illustrated Henry Williamson's classic Tarka the Otter, 1932, and the What to Look For Ladybird series; these and his commercial designs are on show.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 8 October 2017.

LONDON
Adam Nathaniel Furman: The Roman Singularity
Coinciding with the 15th London Design Festival, a city of 3D-printed models by architectural designer Adam Nathaniel Furman encapsulates Rome's significance as a destination for thinkers, full of history and art throughout the centuries. Accompanying the city is a new work by Furman, Pasteeshio. Made from 3D-printed glazed ceramics arranged into a larger composition, the sculpture sits alongside Pasticcio, the column of fragments made by Sir John Soane, prompting comparisons between the 19th- and 21st-century works.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+ 44 (0) 20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
From 16 September to
10 December 2017.

LONDON
Egypt Uncovered: Belzoni and the Tomb of Pharaoh Seti I

To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Giovanni Battista Belzoni's discovery of the tomb of Seti I on 17 October 1817, this exhibition tells the story of the extraordinary former circus strongman and Seti I's white alabaster sarcophagus. It charts the sarcophagus' long journey to London, including the party Soane threw to mark the arrival of his prized acquisition.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+ 44 (0) 20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
From 11 October 2017
to 14 April 2018.

LONDON
Plywood: Material of the Modern World
Though often overlooked and seemingly unglamorous, plywood is a versatile, economical and strong material used in designs for many types of objects, such as aeroplanes, skateboards and canoes. Examining the global impact of the material from the 1850s to the present, the exhibition brings together more than 120 objects that reflect how the image of plywood was transformed from a cheap product best hidden to a celebrated element of modernist design, as in Charles and Ray Eames' chairs.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 12 November 2017.


LONDON
Desire, love, identity: exploring LGBTQ histories

Marking the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Sexual Offences Act that partially decriminalised homosexuality in England and Wales, a selection of objects ranging from 9000 BC to the present have been brought together to chart diverse experiences of love, sex and identity across cultures and across time. Among the exhibits are a silver medallion depicting the emperor Hadrian, minted in Rome in AD 119–22, and a coin showing his lover Antinous, from AD 130–38, (both above), images of Sappho and modern campaign badges. A marked trail explores this theme through key objects, such as the Warren Cup,
in the permanent collections.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
Until 15 October 2017.



LONDON
Giovanni Da Rimini: An Early 14th-Century Masterpiece Reunited

A recent purchase by the National Gallery, acquired in 2015 with the assistance of US philanthropist Ronald S Lauder, the well-preserved panel Scenes from the Lives of the Virgin and other Saints,1300–05 (above) by Giovanni da Rimini (active 1292–1336) is on public display for the first time. The exhibition explores this exquisite, rare oil painting on a panel in the context of a brief artistic flourishing in the early 14th-century Rimini. The National Gallery's panel is thought to be half of a diptych and will be joined by what is believed to be the other half, Scenes from the Life of Christ, from the Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica, Rome.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 8 October 2017.


LONDON
The Encounter: Drawings from Leonardo to Rembrandt

A spectacular selection of fine portrait drawings by Old Masters from across Europe offers an insight into the intimate encounter between sitter and artist. Among the 50 works on show are drawings by Leonardo, Dürer, Rembrandt, Rubens and Hans Holbein the Younger, such as the latter's portrait of Sir John Godsalve, circa 1532-34 (above). Exhibiting exceptional draughtsmanship, a wide range of people are captured in the portraits. Some (such as Henry Parker, Lord Morley, Henry VIII's ambassador to Nuremberg) can be identified, others are unknown friends, pupils or people in the street. Also displayed are the tools and media used for these drawings, including metalpoint and coloured chalks.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0)20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
From 13 July to 22 October 2017.


LONDON
Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion

The influential Spanish designer Cristóbal Balenciaga (1895–1972) developed some famous shapes in fashion such as the tunic, the sack, the baby doll and the shift dress. After starting up in San Sebastian, he opened his famous fashion-house in Paris 80 years ago, but the 1950s and 1960s are considered his most creative years and are the focal point of this show. As well as garments and hats by Balenciaga and his followers, X-rays (examining how innovative structures were achieved), sketches, patterns and fabric samples are on view. There are also charming photographs, such as Dovima with Sacha, cloche and suit by Balenciaga, Café des Deux Magots, Paris, 1955, by Richard Avedon (above) to amuse. Mainly drawn from the V&A's own Balenciaga collection begun by Cecil Beaton in the 1970s, the clothes on show bear witness to a versatile designer who could create everything from ballgowns to gardening shorts for a high-profile, exclusive clientele.
Victoria & Albert Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 18 February 2018.

LONDON
Sargent: The Watercolours

In this exhibition some 80 works by John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) reflect the artist's technical talents and individuality during his fertile period of watercolour production between 1900 and 1918. Drawn to the flexibility of the medium, which allowed him to paint rapidly and with little preparation, Sargent used watercolour to escape the studio and work en plein air. He travelled through southern Europe and the Middle East, recording landscapes, architecture and people that he saw there. While his watercolours, such as The Church of Santa Maria della Salute, Venice, circa 1904–9 (above), and Rome: An Architectural Study, circa 1906–7, are often viewed and then overlooked as mere travel souvenirs, they actually form an important part of Sargent's oeuvre as they reveal his distinctive way of seeing and composing, using close-ups, unorthodox and obscured viewpoints and dynamic poses.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
From 21 June to 8 October 2017.

LONDON
Canaletto and the Art of Venice

Joseph Smith (circa 1674−1770), an English merchant and later British Consul in Venice, was the greatest patron of art in the city at the time. In 1762, George III purchased almost all of Smith's paintings, which made the Royal Collection pre-eminent in 18th-century Venetian art in the world. It includes the largest number of works by Canaletto. More than 200 paintings, drawings and prints by this famous Venetian painter and his contemporaries demonstrate how they captured the allure of the city. Not only did Canaletto and others meticulously record the vibrancy of the city, they also developed the capriccio fantasies, as in Marco Riccis' Caprice View with Roman Ruins, circa 1729 (above).
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)20 7766 7300
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 19 May to 12 November 2017.

LONDON
Queer British Art 1861–1967

Marking the 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalisation of male homosexuality in England and Wales, this is the first exhibition devoted to queer British art. It explores lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) identities in the arts – from the abolition of the death penalty for sodomy in 1861 to the passing of the Sexual Offences Act in 1967. With a variety of works covering the public and the personal, the playful and the political, it looks at the role of queer art in society, coded desires, women who defied convention, and Sixties Soho. Works by Francis Bacon, Cecil Beaton, Duncan Grant, Evelyn de Morgan, and more are shown alongside films, magazines, personal photographs, ephemera, and objects such as the door from Oscar Wilde's prison cell.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
Until 1 October 2017.



NOTTINGHAM
Kaleidoscope: Colour and Sequence in 1960s British Art

British Art in the 1960s often used bold colours and unexpected shapes as it explored rationality and irrationality, order and waywardness, while at the same time following some sort of order based on repetition, sequence and symmetry. Paintings and sculptures by more than 20 artists reveal a common language across a range of movements, such as Op Art, Pop Art, Constructivism, and New Generation sculpture. Movement in Squares, 1961 (above) by the queen of Op Art Bridget Riley, is on show alongside work by Phillip King and William Turnbull.
Djangoly Gallery, Nottingham Lakeside Arts
+44 (0)115 846 7777
(www.lakesidearts.org.uk)
Until 24 September 2017.

OXFORD
Bodleian Treasures: 21 pairs and a Tropical Forest

This selection of highlights from 12 million items in the Bodleian's extensive collections reveals some renowned rarities alongside less familiar treasures. Among them are: Shakespeare's First Folio, Handel's Messiah, William Blake's Marriage of Heaven and Hell and the illustrated Sanskrit religious text Shikshapatri.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 287400
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until 11 February 2018.

UNITED STATES
BOSTON, Massachusetts
Follow the North Star: Inuit Art from the Collection of Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh

As the Canadian Confederation reaches its 150th anniversary, the Museum of Fine Arts is marking the milestone with a presentation of Inuit prints from the collection of portrait photographer Yousuf Karsh and his wife Estrellita. Most of the pieces are stonecuts, printed from blocks of soapstone, and stem from the printmaking cooperative at Cape Dorset, north of Hudson Bay, where the technique was introduced in the late 1950s. Works by prominent Inuit artists, such as Kenojuak Ashevak, Agnes Nanogak, Jessie Oonark, Pudlo Pudlat, and Lucy Qinnuayuak explore the themes of family, hunting, shamanism, and tradition and modernity. A selection of small-scale sculptures is also on show.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 31 December 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Arts of Korea

Highlights from one of the largest American collections of Korean art are going on view in a new, much expanded gallery in the Brooklyn Museum. Now three times the size of the previous space, the gallery will showcase many artefacts that have not been on public display before. The 80 works, covering 1800 years of art in Korea, include celadon ceramics of the Goryeo dynasty including a fine 12th-century ewer in the shape of a lotus bud, a rare early 19th-century official's wide-brimmed hat for ceremonial occasions (which was later banned because of its extravagant scale), and a 19th-century hwalot, a heavily embroidered bridal cloak, which after extensive conservation work is on display for the first time since it was acquired in 1927.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
From 15 September 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Soulful Creatures: Animal Mummies in Ancient Egypt
Examining the mummification of animals offers a chance to understand their role in both the natural and supernatural worlds of ancient Egypt. Cats, dogs, birds and snakes are among the animal mummies, from at least 31 different cemeteries, that are displayed in this exhibition, along with artefacts that explore their ritual use from 3000 BC to the end of the 2nd century AD. Among the highlights is the elaborate and expensive ibis mummy from the early Roman period, wrapped in dyed linen strips to form a herringbone pattern. CT scans reveal new insights into the mummies' contents, and show how some priests misled worshippers.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
From 29 September 2017 to
21 January 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Modigliani Unmasked

Early drawings by Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920) collected by his friend and first patron Paul Alexandre are on display (many for the first time in the US) in this exploration of how the artist's heritage as an Italian Sephardic Jew has influenced his work. Modigliani arrived in Paris in 1906 at a time when anti-Semitism was rife in the city. His drawings, paintings and sculptures respond to the social issues of the era, multiculturalism, and thoughts on identity.
The Jewish Museum
+1 212 423 3200
(thejewishmuseum.org)
From 15 September 2017 to
4 February 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque

A monumental, newly conserved canvas by Cristóbal de Villalpando (circa 1649–1714), painted for a chapel in Puebla Cathedral in 1683 is on display for the first time outside its usual home. Titled Moses and the Brazen Serpent and the Transfiguration of Jesus the canvas is accompanied by 10 other paintings, including The Deluge, 1689 (above), many of which have not previously been seen in the US.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 15 October 2017.


NEW YORK, New York
American Indian Art from the Fenimore Art Museum: The Thaw Collection

Eugene and Clare Thaw's collection of Native North American art spans many centuries and a wide range of art forms. Sculpture, basketry, textiles, ceramics, paintings, drawings and decorative arts are all represented in this selection of 38 highlights from their collection. A Lakota (Sioux) war record painted on animal hide around 1880 (above), a waterproof Kamleika garment (or parka) made from sea-mammal gut, and a whelk shell gorget (circa 1100–1400) carved by a Mississippian sculptor show the diversity of Native American artworks.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 8 October 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Mummies

The most iconic symbol of ancient Egypt is the mummy. This exhibition reveals the secrets of mummification using modern scientific techniques, rare artefacts and cutting-edge imagery. Egyptian mummies are displayed alongside others from Peru, where numerous different cultures practised mummification thousands of years ago.
American Museum of Natural History
+1 212 769 5100
(www.amnh.org)
Until 7 January 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Infinite Blue

The colour blue has been used to represent spirituality, power, status and beauty in a range of cultures throughout history. Following one common strand, the blue artworks on display from across the globe reveal information about cultural values, technological advances, and international trade. As part of  A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum (a series of exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A Sackler Center for Feminist Art), Infinite Blue features paintings, prints, drawings, decorative arts, printed books and more. Among the highlights are illuminated manuscripts exemplifying the use of blue in Christian iconography, early Chinese blue-and-white porcelain, and a stunning blue faience, late 2nd-century statuette of Aphrodite (above) from Ptolemaic Egypt.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 5 November 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
A Woman's Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt

Also part of the Brooklyn Museum's series A Year of Yes, this exhibition delves into the ancient Egyptian belief that to make rebirth possible for a deceased woman, she must briefly turn into a man long enough to create a foetus. This is because, according to Egyptian medicine, the man creates the foetus and passes it on to the woman during sex. Evidence for this post-mortem gender transformation can be seen in coffins on which a woman is depicted with red skin (more commonly a male attribute) and on which spells that address the deceased with masculine pronouns are recorded. As well as painted sarcophagi, like the Coffin of the Lady of the House, circa 1292-1190 BC (above), small statuettes are on display, showing the woman returned to her female state after recreating herself for rebirth.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until end 2017.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt

The special status of cats in ancient Egyptian society, religion and politics is explored from the Middle Kingdom to the Byzantine period. On show are feline coffins and statues and amulets oof the cat-headed goddess Bastet.
Freer/Sackler, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
From 14 October 2017 to 15 January 2018.



WASHINGTON DC

R e-sound: Bells of Ancient China
A variety of ancient bells, spanning the entirety of the Chinese Bronze Age (circa 1800 BC–AD 9) and ranging in height from one inch to nearly three feet, chart the development of bell design and related musical practices, reflect the distinct musical cultures that flourished in north and south China. Among the first bronze objects made in China, the bells include examples made for animals (especially dog collars) and chariots (ling), singnalling bells used in warfare (zheng) and bells buried with the dead. Large bells with clappers (bo) (above), originated in the Yangzi River valley and were often decorated with birds, tigers and other creatures.
Freer/Sackler, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
From 14 October 2017.


WASHINGTON DC

Edvard Munch: Colour in Context
From an early age the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) was in contact with spiritualist ideas popular in the late 19th century. He believed he could see energies emanating from certain hues. This exhibition brings together 21 of his prints, including Madonna, 1895 (above), showing how his choice, combination and meaning of colour were informed by spiritualist principles and psychological theories. Most of the works on display are from the Epstein Family Collection, the most significant collection of Munch's works outside Norway.
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
From 3 September 2017 to
28 January 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
America Collects Eighteenth-Century French Painting

Many 18th-century French paintings that have ended up in collections across America owe their fate to Napoleon's older brother, Joseph Bonaparte. When he fled across the Atlantic in 1815, Joseph Bonaparte took his collection of art by the likes of Jacques Louis David, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, Hubert Robert and Jean Honoré Fragonard with him. He put them on public display, igniting a widespread passion for French art across the United States. Portraits, landscapes, still lifes and scenes from antiquity and Classical mythology – such as Louis Jean François Lagrenée's Pygmalion and Galatea, 1784 (above) and François André Vincent's Arria and Paetus, 1784, both by famous and less well-known artists, all became hugely popular.
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
Until 20 August 2017.

BRAZIL
SÃO PAULO
Tolouse-Lautrec in Red

At the end of the 19th century, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) spent his time capturing the vibrancy of life in Paris on canvas. The São Paulo museum has the best European art collection in South America and this show brings together paintings with five different themes. The three central works showing scenes of prostitutes inside maisons closes (brothels) are presented in a red panel, evoking the famous entrance hall of the Maison La Fleur Blanche where the painter was a frequent visitor. Women from many other walks of life are portrayed (washerwomen, models, the bourgeoisie and nobility), as well as men (whose names we know – unlike most of their female counterparts), alongside bars, restaurants, concert -halls and cabarets in the recently electrified French capital.
Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand
+55 11 3149 5959
(www.masp.art.br)
Until 1 October 2017.

CROATIA
ZAGREB
Baroque Splendour of Venice: Tiepolo and Contemporaries

Masterpieces of the Venetian Baroque from the extensive collection of the Pinacoteca Civica di Vicenza offer a rich tour of 18th-century Italian culture. Taking centre stage is Tiepolo, whose successful career saw him undertake grand commissions across Venice and beyond. His contemporaries, Giambattista Piazzetta, Marco and Sebastiano Ricci, Giambattista Pittoni, Francesco Aviani and Giuseppe Zais are among the other artists featured. There is also work by less well-known artists, such as Louis Dorigny (1654–1742) whose La Concordia is shown above.
Museum of Arts and Crafts
+ 385 1 4882 111
(muoen.wordpress.com)
Until 1 October 2017.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
Pharaoh: The Face of Power

During the Middle Kingdom (circa 2000–1800 BC), the pharaoh unified the country and strengthened his position after a period of decline. Portraits were used to transmit the idea of power. Some sculptures show pharaohs (such as Amenemhet III and his predecessor Sesostris III) looking stern and authoritative, while others, like The Black Head of a King (also Amenemhet III)
capture a sense of the ruler's powerful personality. Jewellery
and amulets are also on view.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.dk)
From 12 October 2017 to
25 February 2018.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
French Painting

The story of 150 years of French painting, between 1800 and 1950, is told in masterpieces from the Glyptotek collection that emphasise the inventiveness of art during this period. The exhibition travels backwards through time, featuring work by Manet, Monet, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Degas – including his Jockeys Before the Race, circa 1888 (above) – and other artists active in France. Although the focus is on paintings, drawings and small sculptures also make an appearance, reflecting the different ways in which artists strove for originality.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
Until 31 December 2017.



FRANCE
LENS
Italian Paintings from Northern France: Dialogues and Connections

This exhibition features some 20 Italian paintings that are held in collections in Picardy and the Nord-Pas-de-Calais exploring connecting links between 16th- to 18th-century artists. Among the highlights is a charming, 16th-century oil on panel showing Charity (above) from the workshop of Francesco Salviati (1510–63). The exhibition in the Lens Glass Pavilion comes at the end of the Heures italiennes series that has been held throughout 2017 in the Hauts-de-France region.
Musée du Louvre-Lens
+33 (0) 32 11 86 321
(www.louvrelens.fr)
From 18 October 2017 to
28 May 2018.

LENS
Music! Echoes of Antiquity
Artefacts from Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome offer an insight into the role music played in their social, political and religious structures. Cylinder seals, vases, papyri and reliefs reflect the functions of music: as a marker of various stages in the life cycle, as part of religious rituals, as intermediary between gods and men, and as an accompaniment to battles and feasts. A painted wood stela, 1069–664 BC (above) shows the blind harpist Djedkhonsuiuefank playing before the god Ra-Horakhty.
Musée du Louvre-Lens
+33 (0) 32 11 86 321
(www.louvrelens.fr)
From 13 September 2017 to 15 January 2018.

NICE
Nice in the School of History

The archaeology of Nice and its environs stretches back into prehistory. This exhibition brings together works of art and artefacts to tell its long history, from its origins as the Greek colony Nikaia to the cosmopolitan tourist destination that it is today as France's fifth city.
Musée Masséna
+33 4 93 91 19 10
(ecolesdenice2017.nice.fr)
Until 15 October 2017.

PARIS
2017: The Year of France-Colombia

To mark France-Colombia 2017, this display of 18th-century art from the Viceroyalty of New Granada celebrates Colombian cultural heritage. A wooden statue of Saint Barbara, influenced by the Seville school and still an influence on local artists, and the ornate monstrance from the church of San Ignacio in Bogotá make up the display.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 20 September 2017 to 15 January 2018.


PARIS
Drawing in the Open Air: Variations of Drawings from Nature in the First Half of the 19th Century
By the 19th century the ability to draw in the open air became an essential part of an artist's training and was practised by many. A large number of plein air works depict a variety of subjects, including the unfinished View of Frascati (above) by Achille Bénouville (1815–91) from the Louvre's own Department of Prints and Drawings.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 18 October 2017
to 29 January 2018.

PARIS
The Power of Flowers: Pierre-Joseph Redouté

Often dubbed 'the Raphael of Flowers', Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759–1840), combined science and art in his accurate botanical paintings. He recorded new plants, collected from all over the globe, that appeared in gardens, reproducing them meticulously and elegantly in watercolour on vellum. Appointed painter to Empress Joséphine and Queen Marie-Amélie, he was also an engraver, a publisher and a teacher. In this, the first exhibition in France completely dedicated to Redouté and his influence, more than 250 works on loan from various museums around the country will be on show.
Musée de la Vie Romantique
+33 1 55 31 95 67
(museevieromantique.paris.fr)
Until 1 October 2017.


ITALY
VENICE
Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable

For the first time, the two venues of the Pinault Collection in Venice (Palazzo Grasso and Punta della Dogana) are devoted to the work of a single artist – Damien Hirst. In this ambitious, sprawling and bizarre exhibition, the artist not only imagined the precious artefacts on board a fictional ancient wreck, named the Unbelievable, he had them constructed, deposited them on the seabed for 10 years and then recovered them. Now, the head of Medusa (above), a statue of Proteus, a sphinx and the skull of a Cyclops feature in an exhibition that turns art and archaeology on its head.
Palazzo Grassi and
Punta della Dogana
+39 041 2401 308
(www.palazzograssi.it)
Until 3 December 2017.

POLAND
KRAKOW
Adriatic Epopee: Ivan Meštrović

The work of Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović (1883–1962) spread across Europe and into the United States, where he was the first living artist to be the subject of a retrospective at the Met. His sculptures, such as Contemplation, 1924 (above), his drawings, lithographs and architectural plans explore themes, such as symbolism, religious inspiration, south Slavic mythology, motherhood, the female nude and public monuments.
International Cultural Centre
+48 12 424 28 11
(mck.krakow.pl)
Until 5 November 2017.

SPAIN
MADRID
Sonia Delaunay: Art, Design and Fashion

As well as being an avant-garde painter, Sonia Delaunay (1885–1979) was also a prolific designer who strove to apply her ideas to everyday life. Focusing on her creative relationship with her husband Robert Delaunay and her work in Madrid after they moved there 100 years ago, this exhibition highlights the multi-disciplinary nature of her work. It shows her paintings, and also her designs for books advertisements, fashion, textiles, interiors, theatrical sets and stylish costume designs, such as one (above) for the ballet Cleopatra in 1918.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 15 October 2017.

SWITZERLAND
MARTIGNY
Cézanne: The Song of the Earth

Paintings, watercolours and drawings from every stage of Cézanne's career demonstrate how he devoted himself to a few well-chosen themes. Landscapes, still lifes, portraits and depictions of women bathers are among his favourite subjects.
Fondation Pierre Gianadda
+41 27 722 39 78
(www.gianadda.ch)
Until 19 November 2017.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
LONDON
Frieze Sculpture 2017

London's largest outdoor exhibition, Frieze's summer show in Regent's Park features 23 sculptures by 20th-century and contemporary artists from across the globe. Among those whose work is represented are: Eduardo Paolozzi, Rasheed Araeen, Gary Hume, Alicja Kwade, Hank Willis Thomas, Thomas J Price and Jaume Plensa.
Regent's Park
+44 (0)20 3372 6111
(frieze.com)
Until 8 October 2017.

LONDON
Tribal Art London

This annual fair is dedicated to tribal art of all kinds, and features a diverse mix of works, including textiles, sculptures, ceramics, jewellery, books and ethnographic photographs from remote regions of Oceania, Africa and Asia. Among the exhibits is a mukudj mask (right) which is used in dances to mark important occasions in Punu communities in southern Gabon. There will be daily lectures on tribal art both for novices and experienced collectors and also on the history of tribal tattoos and other forms of now fashionable body art.
Mall Galleries
(tribalartlondon.com)
6–9 September


LONDON
Londinium and Blood Rite

Devoted to London's Roman history, Londinium is a festival featuring a broad programme of events (many of them free) from wine-tastings (on 1 and 29 September) to comedy tours (from 5 to 13 September and 31 September to 1 October). One of the highlights of the festival is a series of talks: Mary Beard will deliver the keynote lecture on images of Roman emperors (26 October). Other speakers include: Simon Elliott (21 September; 2 and 12 October); Gustav Milne (27 September); John Clark (5 October and 8 November) and Roger Tomlin (10 October).


Their subjects are diverse: from the 1st-century Roman writing tablets, found at the Bloomberg site, to the rediscovery of Londinium in the 16th century. And on 20–21 October, there is Blood Rite, an outdoor show, using dance, music and digital animation to show the impact of Londinium and its amphitheatre on the contemporary city.
Various locations
(visitlondon.com/romans)

MANCETTER, Warwickshire
Plato's Phaedo: The Paths of Life and Death

The Prometheus Trust's three linked weekend seminars offer a chance to become well acquainted with Plato's Phaedo, an important philosophical text that examines the human condition, destiny, the nature of virtue and the immortality of the soul.
Purley Chase Centre
(www.prometheustrust.co.uk/html/education.html)
15–17 September; 20–22 October; 1–3 December 2017

OXFORD
Transmission: The Migration of Iconography in Classical Art

This Classical Art Research Centre (CARC) workshop examines the use of certain Graeco-Roman schemes of imagery across different media, places and periods. A range of topics such as copy-books, mythological mosaics, transmission across Roman provinces, and Classical imagery in Late Antique manuscripts will be covered.
CARC, University of Oxford
(www.carc.ox.ac.uk)
28–29 September

CHINA
HONG KONG
Fine Art Asia

This is the 12th year of Fine Art Asia, which brings to Hong Kong a large number of renowned exhibitors from the region and beyond. It covers more than 5000 years of art – from ancient Buddhist and Himalayan bronzes to contemporary photography. The fair attracts around 100 of the top international dealers offering antique silver and timepieces, Impressionist, modern and contemporary art and design.
This is Asia's leading fine art fair.
Hong Kong Convention
& Exhibition Centre
(www.fineartasia.com)
30 September–3 October


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