Events


UNITED KINGDOM

BATH
Michael Petry: In the Realm of the Gods

Ley lines, as described in 1921 by the self-taught antiquarian Alfred Watkins, refer to the relatively straight lines on which Neolithic monuments and other ancient sites are aligned. A ley line is said to run between two of Bath's most famous locations, the Royal Crescent and the Circus, which, according to some, represent the moon and the sun. In exploring these mysterious lines in the city, Michael Petry has created for the exhibition a glass ley line that takes inspiration from Neolithic forms.
Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388 569
(www.holburne.org)
Until 8 April 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Flux: Parian Unpacked

In 2016, the Fitzwilliam acquired the David Glynn Collection, more than 300 pieces of 19th-century Parian ware (above), a porcelain invented by the Minton pottery in 1845 to look like marble and named after the Greek island of Paros where white marble is found. These pieces depict literary figures, kings and queens, notable people from British history, and characters from mythology. More than 100 busts are displayed, curated by ceramic artist Matt Smith, who delves into questions of our notion of history and its constant state of flux, celebrity and colonialism. New Parian works by Smith throughout the galleries bring these themes to mind when contemplating the permanent collections.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0) 1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 6 March to 1 July 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery

Charting nearly a century of British potters' innovative work using traditional ceramic forms, this show looks at the evolution of specific types of vessel in British studio pottery. Organised with the Yale Center of British Art, where it was first displayed, the show features more than 100 historic and contemporary ceramics by celebrated artists such as Lucie Rie, Edmund de Waal, Grayson Perry and Clare Twomey, whose work Made in China – a sprawling set of 80 vast porcelain vases, highlighting the difference in labour conditions in different regions – will be installed around the museum.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0) 1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 20 March to 17 June 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Sampled Lives: Samplers from the Fitzwilliam Museum

More than 100 embroidered and stitched samplers offer a rare glimpse into the lives of ordinary young women in the past. The pieces, whose makers range in date from mid-17th-century English Quakers to early 20th-century school pupils, give an insight into education, employment, family, status and needlework skills.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 8 April 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Another India: Explorations and Expressions of Indigenous South Asia

Marking the 70th anniversary of India's independence from Britain and the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, this exhibition presents more than 100 artefacts, paintings and photographs from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology collections (some on show for the first time) along with work by contemporary artists in an exploration of the diverse minority populations of India. Together, the pieces on display tell the story of colonialism, British involvement in the subcontinent, and collecting.
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
+44 (0)1223 333516
(maa.cam.ac.uk)
Until 22 April 2018.

EDINBURGH
A New Era: Scottish Modern Art 1900–1950

The traditional view of modern Scottish art is that it was dominated by the Scottish Colourists and heavily influenced by French artists. By putting progressive works by leading Scottish artists and their lesser-known counterparts inthe spotlight, this exhibition challenges previous thinking on the subject. More than 80 works by some 50 artists reveal the contributions that Scottish artists made to Expressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, Surrealism and Abstraction.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 10 June 2018.LONDON

EDINBURGH
A New Era: Scottish Modern Art 1900–1950

The traditional view of modern Scottish art is that it was dominated by the Scottish Colourists of the 1920s and 1930s, heavily influenced by French artists. By putting progressive works by leading artists and their lesser-known counterparts in the spotlight, this show challenges previous thinking. More than 80 works by 50 artists reveal Scotland's contributions to Expressionism, Surrealism, Fauvism, Cubism and Abstraction.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 10 June 2018.


EDINBURGH
Splendours of the Subcontinent: A Prince's Tour of India 1875–6

As part of the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, gifts presented to Edward, Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII, on his 1875–76 tour of India, Sri Lanka and Nepal are on show. It is the first time the gifts – exquisite examples of Indian craftsmanship, including gold and silverware, ceremonial arms and jewellery such as the sirpech (turban ornament) presented by Sajjan Singh, Maharaja of Udaipur (above) – have been displayed together since the late 19th century. Watercolours and photographs help to tell the story of the royal visit.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 15 December to
15 April 2018.


EDINBURGH
Constable and McTaggart

John Constable's impact on Scottish landscape painter William McTaggart (1835–1910) is examined in this display, which includes Constable's monumental Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows, 1831 (above) and McTaggart's The Storm, 1890. McTaggart saw Constable's paintings a number of times during the 19th century, but his style changed in the 1880s when 118 works by Constable were on display in Edinburgh. Constable's influence can be seen in The Storm – in the scale of the painting, the depiction of the approaching storm, and in the use of a variety of brush strokes.
Scottish National Gallery
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 25 March 2018.

LIVERPOOL
John Piper

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral was consecrated 50 years ago and this exhibition marks the occasion by honouring British artist John Piper (1903–92), who designed many of its stained-glass windows, including the centrepiece of the cathedral. More than 40 of his works, particularly painting and collages, chart Piper's career, his relationship with major international artists, such as Jean Arp and Georges Braque, and his influence on British art from the 1930s. His work shows a fondness for his native landscapes and an understanding of earlier art forms, such as Anglo-Saxon carving and medieval stained-glass windows.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 17 November to 18 March 2018.

LIVERPOOL
Surrealism in Egypt: Art et Liberté 1938–1948
Surrealist art in Egypt, produced by a collective of artists and writers in Cairo, has often been overlooked, but it is a distinct episode in the story of the movement. The majority of this material – comprising more than 100 paintings, photographs, film and archival documents – has not been seen before in the UK, and it reveals the socio-political motivations that drove the Art et Liberté group. They published their manifesto Long Live Degenerate Art in 1938, in response to the local rise of fascism and, in the following decade, young intellectuals eager for reform created a variety of work. Themes explored include womens issues and police brutality.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 17 November to 18 March 2018.

LONDON
Royal Watercolour Society Spring Exhibition

A selection of the latest works by members of the Royal Watercolour Society will be on show for a month at the RWS resident venue. The society was founded in 1804, making it the world's oldest watercolour society, as well as perhaps the most prestigious. RWS artists work in a wide range of styles on paper in any water-based media, and this includes gouache, acrylic and ink.
Bankside Gallery
+44 (020 7928 7521)
(www.banksidegallery.com)
From 23 March to 21 April 2018.

LONDON
James Cook: The Voyages
To mark 250 years since Captain James Cook set sail from Plymouth on Endeavour at the start of his first expedition, the British Library brings together original documents by the on-board artists, scientists and seamen to illuminate the story of Cook's three major voyages of exploration to the Pacific, and the encounters that improved British knowledge of the world's geography. Journals, maps, handwritten log books, natural history drawings (including the first European depiction of a kangaroo) and drawings by Polynesian high priest and navigator Tupaia, who joined the ship in Tahiti, show the variety of talents exhbitied by these pioneering voyagers.
British Library
(www.bl.uk)
+44 (0)1937 546546
From 27 April to 28 August 2018.

LONDON
Pots with Attitude: British Satire on Ceramics, 1760–1830
Satirical prints on ceramics, as well as on paper, put the spotlight on 18th-century Georgian society.
The upper classes enjoyed political parodies and satirical takes on the Napoleonic War in hand-coloured prints, like the one on this Spode bone china jug (above) of John Bull guarding a toy shop, from 1803. Bawdy mugs and jugs for drinking alcohol brought similar images to a wider audience. Ceramics, fans and handkerchiefs carried similar mocking scenes. This display is part of a project researching the relationship between 18th-century prints and ceramics, funded by the Monument Trust.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 13 March 2018.

LONDON
Turning Time
An exhibition of eight evocative new photographs by the German artist, Vera Lutter, includes impressive images of the mighty Greek temples at Paestum, southern Italy, such as the gelatin silver print Temple of Athena, Paestum, V: October 8, 2015 (above) and the Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany. These studies of both historic monuments and pivotal technological innovations reflect Lutter's deep relationship with the forces of time. At each site she transformed a standard shipping container into a camera obscura, one of the oldest image-capturing technologies, whereby light enters into a dark space through a pinhole, projecting an image onto a sheet of photographic paper. Lutter's images are large and exposure time can last for hours, weeks, even months. The resulting pictures are dramatic and unique, as they cannot be reprinted.
Gagosian, Britannia Street
+44 (0)207 841 9960
(www.gagosian.com)
Until 14 April 2018.

LONDON
Murillo: The Self Portraits
To celebrate the 400th birthday of one of Spain's great Golden Age painters, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, this exhibition takes a close look at his only two known self-portraits – reunited for the first time in more than three centuries. Murillo's paintings of religious scenes and street children have long been celebrated, but his portraiture has been somewhat overlooked. New York's Frick Collection has loaned the first self-portrait, painted circa 1650–55 and showing Murillo, in his 30s, elegantly dressed but there is nothing in it to suggest his vocation. In the National Gallery's self-portrait (above), we see the artist, some 20 years later, with his palette and brushes. Other works by Murillo are on show, along with subsequent reproductions of the two self-portraits, which show their popularity in Europe.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 21 May 2018.

LONDON
Monet & Architecture

Monet is widely praised for his sensitive depictions of the natural world – gardens, landscapes and the sea – but in this exhibition it is his response to the built environment that is under the microscope. In an interview in 1895, the artist said: 'Other painters paint a bridge, a house, a boat… I want to paint the air that surrounds the bridge, the house, the boat – the beauty of the light in which they exist.' The works on display reveal how he set out to do just this throughout his career. Village scenes and modern cityscapes reflect the changes in society in Monet's day. Among the highlights are his iconic pictures of Venice and London.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 9 April to 29 July 2018.

LONDON
Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography
Lewis Carroll (the Reverend Charles Dodgson) did much more than conjure up the children's classics: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass. He was a mathematics don in Oxford and also a pioneering photographer. This exhibition brings together portraits taken by Carroll, such as one of Alice Liddell (the child for whom he wrote the Alice books) in 1858 (above), and by other ground breaking Victorian photographers, such as Julia Margaret Cameron, Lady Clementina Hawarden and Oscar Rejlander, to chart the development of art photography. Rejlander, described by some as 'the father of photoshop' because of his complex photomontages. His striking Two Ways of Life (1856–57), combines over 30 separate negatives to create a single image so large that it was printed on two sheets of paper. Reijlander taught the other three photographers briefly, and many ideas were exchanged among them, as this exhibition reveals.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0) 20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
From 1 March to
20 May 2018.

LONDON
Charles I: King and Collector
Charles I was one of the great collectors and patrons of his day but, after his execution in 1649, his collection of masterpieces, by the likes of Titian, Dürer, Mantegna and Holbein, and contemporary commissions by Rubens, Van Dyck and others, was sold off. Charles II recovered many pieces during the Restoration, but others stayed scattered across Europe. More than 100 works, including Classical sculpture, such as the Royal Collection's famous 2nd-century Crouching Venus (above), paintings, tapestries and miniatures, will be reunited for this show that explores their impact on England's visual culture. (For the art of Charles II see Art and Power on pages 8 to13).
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 15 April 2018.

LONDON
Joan Jonas
With a range of works spanning five decades, from the late 1960s to the present, Tate Modern is mounting the largest UK exhibition of the boundary-pushing art of American artist Joan Jonas. She is a pioneer of video and performance and her cutting-edge installations address topical themes, such as climate change and extinction.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 14 March to 5 August 2018.

LONDON
Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy
Focusing on one particularly prolific year in the life of Picasso, Tate Modern's first solo exhibition devoted to one of the 20th-century's most popular and influential artists brings together more than 100 paintings, sculptures and drawings as well as photographs, that offer an insight into his personal life. One of the highlights of the show is a set of three images of his lover, Marie-Thérèse Walter, which Picasso painted in five days in March 1932, now shown together for the first time since their creation.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 8 March to 9 September 2018.

LONDON
Living with gods

Beliefs from across the globe are brought together in this exhibition, which was the subject of the recent BBC Radio 4 series by the museum's former director, Neil Macgregor. A wide range of objects chart practices across faiths in a number of themes, such as pilgrimage, co-existence and conflict, and public celebrations. Among the many highlights are the Lion Man (above) from Baden-Württemberg, Germany, a hybrid creature from 40,000 BC, the end of the last Ice Age. Other artefacts include: a miniature prayer-book that may have belonged to Queen Elizabeth I; a Tibetan New Year dance mask; and Soviet scientific atheist posters.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8181
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 8 April 2018.


LONDON
Charles I: King and Collector

Charles I was one of the great art collectors and patrons of his day. After his execution in 1649, his acquisitions of works by Titian, Dürer, Mantegna and Holbein, and contemporary commissions by Rubens, Van Dyck (whose 1635 Triple Portrait of the king is shown below) and others, were sold. His son, Charles II, recovered many pieces during the Restoration, but others remained scattered across Europe. More than 100 works, including Classical sculptures, tapestries and miniatures, as well as studio paintings, are at last reunited and their impact on England's visual culture is explored.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 27 January to 15 April 2018.


LONDON
All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life

Focusing on the visceral work of Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, this exhibition examines how artists in the 20th century have responded to the challenge of capturing their personal experiences of life in paint, imbuing their creations with both sensuality and intimacy – Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud, 1964 (above) by his friend Bacon, is one example. Figurative paintings by other artists, such as Stanley Spencer, Walter Sickert, Frank Auerbach and RB Kitaj, are also on show and connections are made with different generations of artists. Women artists and their role in an world of male-dominated figurative painting are put in the spotlight in works by Paula Rego, Cecily Brown, Celia Paul, Jenny Saville and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 28 February to 27 August 2018.


LONDON
Ocean Liners: Speed & Style

The glitz and glamour of the golden age of ocean travel are recreated in this exhibition, which explores all aspects of design of some of the most luxurious vessels of the 19th and 20th centuries, and considers the wider cultural impact and lasting appeal of ocean liners. More than 100 years of high-end engineering, architecture, interior design, onboard lifestyle and fashion are set out, from Brunel's 1859 Atlantic steamship The Great Eastern to the 1969 launch of the QE2. With more than 250 artefacts, including paintings, ship models, furniture, and posters on show the highlights include: Art Deco interiors, such as a stylish panel from The Rape of Europa, 1934, by Jean Dupas (above) that once adorned the Normandie, which was launched in 1935. Also displayed are Lady Marguerite Allen's pearl and diamond Cartier tiara, saved from the sinking Lusitania when it was torpedoed in 1915 (Lady Allen survived); and a panel fragment from the first-class lounge of that most iconic of ill-fated ships, the Titanic.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 3 February until
10 June 2018.


LONDON
Ayurvedic Man: Encounters with Indian Medicine

Inspired by an 18th-century Nepalese painting of male anatomy made according to classical Ayurveda, this exhibition looks at this long-practised system of medicine. Newly discovered letters from Henry Wellcome's archive are on show alongside manuscripts, paintings and artefacts, such as animal-shaped surgical tools. The exhibits reveal the relationship between colonial and indigenous medicine, the use of plants in healing, and the role of gender in Indian medicine, visualised in a 19th-century watercolour entitled Woman swinging below an aubergine plant (above).
The Wellcome Collection
+44 (0)20 7611 2222
(wellcomecollection.org)
Until 8 April 2018.


LONDON
Reflections: Van Eyck and the Pre-Raphaelites

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood admired Jan van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait of 1434, acquired by the National Gallery in 1842, and the painting shaped their views on draughtsmanship, colour, technique and the symbolic meanings of objects. Now, for the first time, this 15th-century masterpiece will be shown alongside works that it inspired by Rossetti, Holman Hunt, Millais and others. Their representation of domestic scenes and the use of convex mirrors to depict real and illusory spaces, as in The Bath of Venus, 1898–1904, by Charles Haslewood Shannon (above), were all influenced by Van Eyck.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 2 April 2018.



LONDON
Charles II: Art & Power

After years of puritanical rule under Cromwell, the Restoration in 1660, brought renewed interest in the arts in England. King Charles II was a great patron of the arts, but the works he acquired not only served to adorn the royal apartments, but also reinforced his position and glorified the monarchy. Fine portraits, Old Master paintings, such as Orazio Gentileschi's A Sibyl, circa 1635–38 (above), tapestries, furniture and silver-gilt objects reveal how all the arts served to enhance the king's image.
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 8 December to 13 May 2018.



LONDON
The EY Exhibition: Impressionists in London, French Artists in Exile (1870–1904)

During the Franco-Prussian War, some of the great French artists of the 19th century sought refuge in Britain. Here, they were interested in differences in social life: in parks, for example (walking on the grass was prohibited in formal French gardens), at regattas and in social codes. Monet's and Sisley's Thames riverscapes, Pissarro's suburbian scenes and Tissot's fashionable events, such as The Ball on Shipboard, circa 1874 (above), all show an outsider's view of British society.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 2 November to 7 May 2018.

LONDON
Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic

As well as providing an insight into the creation of the beloved bear and the interplay between AA Milne's storytelling and EH Shepard's illustrations, this show looks at the lasting popularity of Winnie-the-Pooh. Original drawings and manuscripts are shown alongside a range of items, such as ceramics and clothes, all featuring Winnie-the-Pooh and his companions Christopher Robin, Eeyore, Piglet and Tigger.
Victoria and Albert Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 9 December until
8 April 2018.

LONDON
Drawn in Colour: Degas from the Burrell

Another exhibition commemorating the centenary of Degas' death, this show presents a group of works by the artist from the Burrell Collection in Glasgow alongside others from the National Galley and other collections. Sir William Burrell (1861–1958), a shipping magnate, collected a large number of Degas pastels from throughout his career that illustrate some of the artist's favourite subjects. The Green Ballet Skirt, circa 1896 (above), shows his love of ballet, while pictures of horse-racing and private scenes of women at their toilette also appealed to him. Degas turned to pastel when his eyesight began to fail, and bold colours became important in contemporary art. Most of these pictures have not been seen outside Glasgow since they were brought here in the early 20th century.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 20 September 2017 to
7 May 2018.

LONDON
Egypt Uncovered: Belzoni and the Tomb of Pharaoh Seti I

To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Giovanni Battista Belzoni's discovery of the tomb of Seti I on 17 October 1817, this exhibition tells the story of the extraordinary former circus strongman and Seti I's white alabaster sarcophagus. It charts the sarcophagus' long journey to London, including the party Soane threw to mark the arrival of his prized acquisition.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+ 44 (0) 20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
From 11 October 2017
to 14 April 2018.

OXFORD
America's Cool Modernism: O'Keeffe to Hopper

Paintings, photographs and prints by American artists of the 1920s and 1930s offer an overview of Modernism in the USA. With loans from the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Met, this is the first time many of them have been seen outside the USA. Early works by Georgia O'Keeffe, such as Black Abstraction, 1927 (above), are on show alongside Edward Hopper's cityscapes, the Precisionist work of Charles Demuth, Paul Strand's photographs, a painting by the American poet ee cummings and one by Edward Steichen, who destroyed most of his paintings before turning to photography.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
From 23 March to 22 July 2018.

OXFORD
From Sappho to Suffrage: Women Who Dared
An important anniversary being celebrated this year is the centenary of the Representation of the People Act of 1918, which gave the vote to British women over the age of 30, with a property qualification. Marking 100 years
of women's suffrage, the Bodleian is highlighting the remarkable achievements of women who defied expectations, from pirates and explorers to suffragettes, and going as far back as the poet Sappho.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
From 6 March 2018 to
3 February 2019.

OXFORD
Designing English

The Bodleian Library holds a spectacular array of medieval manuscripts in English, and a selection of them are on show, along with inscriptions, to provide an in-depth study of graphic design in the first millennium of the English language. Picture books, magnificent illuminations framed with gold, and new page designed for specific tasks, such as handling swans, are featured. Other treasures include the exquisite 9th-century Alfred Jewel (above), made as the handle of an aestel, a pointing device used as a reading aid, and explore how it was designed, created and employed.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until 22 April 2018.

ST IVES, Cornwall
Virginia Woolf: An Exhibition Inspired by her Writings

As a leading member of the Bloomsbury Group, Modernist writer Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)had a profound influence on the arts. Her sister, the artist Vanessa Bell, designed the covers for her books. But many other female artists have responded to Woolf's work and the themes she addressed since then. This exhibition brings together their paintings, sculptures, films, photographs and texts, which go back over the past 160 years. Work by Laura Knight, Frances Hodgkins, Dora Carrington, Louise Bourgeois, Claude Cahun and Agnes Martin explore landscape and nature, the public performance of identity and gender, domesticity, the subconscious and intimacy.
Tate St Ives
+44 (0)1736 796 226
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 29 April 2018.

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Klimt and Schiele: Drawn

Two prominent Austrian artists, Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, died 100 years ago, in 1918. To mark this double centenary, the MFA is exhibiting the artists' work from the Albertina museum in Vienna. Klimt's delicate drawings served as preparatory sketches for paintings, while Schiele, nearly 30 years his junior, treated his bold drawings, such as Portrait of the Artist's Sister-in-law Adele Harms, 1917 (above), as finished works. The pieces on show highlight these and other differences in their work and also the parallels, particularly in the way they captured the
human body.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 28 May 2018.

BOSTON, Massachusetts
Mark Rothko: Reflection

Mark Rothko (1903–70) is well-known for his vast canvases and considered use of colour. He expressed his persisting belief that art should be experienced rather than merely viewed, and this exhibition sets out to give visitors the opportunity to do just that, to experience the immenseness of his iconic large-scale work. The entire span of Rothko's career is represented, starting with his early Surrealist works. The show also explores his admiration for the Old Masters and the long-held tradition that artists continually refer to the past. This is exemplified by the juxtaposition of two portraits of artists, Rothko's Thru the Window, 1938–39, and Rembrandt's Artist
in his Studio, circa 1628.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 1 July 2018.


CHICAGO, Illinois
Ancient Mediterranean Cultures in Contact

A rich display of nearly 100 ancient Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan and Roman objects from the Field Museum's own collections sheds light on the interactions and exchanges between Mediterranean cultures. Although occupied by Greeks and Romans, Egypt held on to many of its long-standing customs, such as its burial rituals, and even exported its religious ideas and practices. Among the highlights are: Etruscan gold jewellery; a tetradrachm of Alexander the Great's general Ptolemy I demonstrating the use of Greek currency in Egypt; a falcon amulet associated with Horus (above) and a bronze bathtub from Boscoreale, a villa near Pompeii, which hints at the ownership of slaves from distant, conquered lands by a wealthy elite.
Field Museum
+1 312 922 9410
(www.fieldmuseum.org)
Until 29 April 2017.

LOS ANGELES, California
Beyond the Nile

The inaugural exhibition in the Getty Museum's new series, The Classical World in Context, charts the cultural and artistic links between Egypt, Greece and Rome from 3000 BC to AD 300. Egyptian stone vessels were sent to Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece, Egyptian statuary influenced Archaic Greek sculpture, and Egyptian religious cults spread through the Roman Empire. It was a two-way interaction: for example, portraits made in the Ptolemaic period, a time of cultural hybridisation, were often in a dual style. The ring (above), shows Ptolemy VI Philometor (186–145 BC) wearing the double crown of Egypt.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
From 27 March to
9 September 2018.


LOS ANGELES, California
Palmyra: Loss and Remembrance
Getty Villa is also taking part in The Classical World in Context series, and the first exhibition in a new gallery dedicated to the theme focusses on Palmyra. Marking the completion of the reinstallation of the Villa's antiquities collection, the show includes loans of detailed limestone Palmyrene funerary portrait sculptures, such as The Beauty of Palmyra, AD 190–210 (above), from Copenhagen's Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, and also the earliest photographs of the site from the Getty Research Institute. The funerary portraits reflect the cultural exchanges that took place at Palmyra with its enviable oasis location on trade routes between the Roman and Parthian Persian empires.
Getty Villa
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
From 18 April 2018
to 27 May 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
Plato in LA: Contemporary Artists' Visions
A third exhibition marking the reopening of the Getty Villa looks at modern artistic responses to one of the most influential thinkers in the Western world, the ancient Athenian philosopher Plato. Sculptures, paintings, drawings and installations by artists, such as Jeff Koons, Huang Yong Ping, Rachel Harrison, Whitney McVeigh, Raymond Pettibon and others, tackle Platonic concepts ranging from the meaning of the written word and the nature of reality and encouarge encourage quiet contemplation.
Getty Villa
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
From 18 April to 3 September 2018.


NEW YORK, New York
Rodin at the Brooklyn Museum: The Body in Bronze

Brooklyn Museum's 58 bronzes by Rodin were acquired in 1983 through a gift from the Iris and B Gerald Cantor Foundation. This exhibition examines how the sculptor captured these human figures and the abstract forms in his work, both large and small, such as Seated Bather with Feet Apart, 1895–1900 (above), cast after 1972. Fragments of ancient Classical sculpture will also be displayed to show the influence such pieces had on this great sculptor.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 22 April 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Leon Golub: Raw Nerve
Leon Golub (1922–2004) blended Classical and modern sources in his work, which is distinguished by his bold depictions of power and brutality and his advocacy of social justice. This survey of Golub's career includes paintings and works on paper portraying a Vietnam War victim, Brazilian dictator Ernesto Geiseil, mercenaries, interrogators, nudes and animals. The exhibition has been organised to celebrate and showcase his enormous painting Gigantomachy II. Painted in 1966 against the backdrop of the Vietnam War, this work presents a contemporary retelling of the battle between the Olympians and giants in Greek mythology, but with no heroes, only anonymous, wounded combatants.
The Met Breuer
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 27 May 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Portable Storage: Tribal Weavings from the Collection of William and Inger Ginsberg
For nomadic groups in Iran, Turkey and the Caucasus, woven bags have provided a practical storage solution for life on the move for hundreds of years. They can contain everything, from bedding to salt and, as the examples in this exhibition show, are often distinctly patterned. As well as bags and a woven saddle cover, the display includes two Islamic paintings that illustrate the role of bags and trappings. The weavings were gifted to The Met in 2015 from the Ginsbergs' collection of small textiles, which focuses on artefacts from tribes in Iran and surrounding areas.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 7 May 2018.


NEW YORK, New York
Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings

Born in the recently industrialised north of England in 1801, Thomas Cole who emigrated to the USA at the age of 17 and rose to become one of the country's foremost landscape painters. He influenced a new generation of American artists and was a founder of the Hudson River School and American Sublime. Staged to celebrate the bicentenary of Cole's arrival in America, this exhibition charts his career on both sides of the Atlantic including his engagement with his English counterparts, JMW Turner and John Constable among them. Oil studies and works on paper join large-scale landscape paintings, with View from Mount Holyoke, Northamton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm –The Oxbow, 1836 (above) taking centre stage.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 13 May 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art
Although frightening, the deadly gorgon Medusa is often portrayed as beautiful and feminine rather than grotesque. This fascinating shift in visual representation first started in the 5th century BC, when other female mythical creatures, including sphinxes, sirens and Scylla, underwent a similar transformation. Art from the Classical world and beyond is used to explore the relationship between beauty and fear, and how the ancient femme fatale combined erotic desire, violence and death, and became a model for the late 19th-century reactions to women's empowerment.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Provocations: Anselm Kiefer at The Met Breuer

While still a student at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Karlsruhe in 1969, the highly successful German artist Anselm Kiefer (born 1945) took photographs of himself in his father's Wehrmacht uniform doing the illegal Nazi salute at historic monuments. This was because the artist found the silence about Germany's past unbearable. These images, some of which he selected for a photo essay six years later, outraged the public. With one painting and 34 works on paper that span Kiefer's career and are all from the Met's own collection, this exhibition shows the artist has not ceased to provoke and continues to examine and confront our conflicted past, time and existence, working with old photographs and using new materials such as lead, hay and earth.
The Met Breuer
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 8 April 2018.


NEW YORK, New York
Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer

Real and mythical animals adorn a large number of luxury objects from late Imperial China. This exhibition takes a close look at Chinese decorative art, focusing on creatures that appear in silk and lacquer between the 13th and the 18th centuries. Dragons, unicorns, phoenixes, butterflies, lions and oxen all appear on robes, rank badges, tapestry panels used for decorating interiors, and an array of lacquer vessels produced by imperial workshops, including a fine Ming dynasty red lacquer box (above).
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 22 July 2018.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.

ST LOUIS, Missouri
Sunken Cities: Egypt's Lost Worlds

The touring exhibition showcasing finds from the lost Egyptian cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus makes its North American debut in St Louis. More than 250 remarkably well-preserved objects, recovered from beneath the waves between 1996 and 2012 by the French archaeologist Franck Goddio and his team, offer an insight into these two once thriving port cities on the Nile delta, which were lost to the sea by the 9th century AD. The exhibition uses exquisite metalwork, gold jewellery, stelae and statues to explore the richly interactive relationship between Greece and Egypt (conquered by Alexander the Great in 332 BC) and to shed light on the cult of Osiris, which was particularly popular in these cities.
Saint Louis Art Museum
+1 314 721 0072
(www.slam.org)
From 25 March to 9 September 2018.


TOLEDO, Ohio
The Mummies: From Egypt to Toledo

The founders of the Toledo Museum of Art, Edward Drummond Libbey and Florence Scott Libbey, purchased two Egyptian mummies in 1906. A young priest buried circa 800 BC and an old man buried circa AD 100 during the Roman period are only occasionally on show for conservation reasons and because of controversy about displaying human remains, but they are now the focal point of an exhibition. One striking object is a painted plaster Ptolemaic mummy mask of a young man with glass eyes, perhaps from Luxor, from circa 100 BC (above right). Other artefacts have been brought together to investigate religion and burial customs, and to show Egyptomania from Napoleon's invasion to the present, and our changing perceptions of this ancient civilisation.
Toledo Museum of Art
+1 419 255 8000
(www.toledomuseum.org)
Until 6 May 2018.

VERO BEACH, Florida
Grayson Perry Making Meaning

A new curatorial partnership between the Royal Academy of Art and the Gallery at Windsor will see the Florida venue stage shows by three different Royal Academicians over the next three years. The cross-dressing Grayson Perry is the first, and his work provides a bold take on identity, Britishness and craftsmanship – not to mention the whole art establishment. His ceramics, sculpture, etchings and tapestries, including his 8-metre-long Comfort Blanket of 2014, cannot be ignored
The Gallery at Windsor
+1 772 388 4071
(www.windsorflorida.com)
Until 27 April 2018.

VERO BEACH, Florida
Grayson Perry: Making Meaning

A new curatorial partnership between the Royal Academy of Arts and The Gallery at Windsor will see the Florida venue stage shows by three Royal Academicians over the next three years. First off is Grayson Perry, with his bold take on subjects such as identity, Britishness, craftsmanship and the art establishment through ceramics, sculpture, etchings and tapestries, including the 8m-long Comfort Blanket, 2014.
The Gallery at Windsor
+1 772 388 4071
(www.windsorflorida.com)
From 15 January to 27 April 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
Heavenly Earth: Images of Saint Francis at La Verna

In September 1224, Francis of Assisi spent 40 days fasting and praying in the wilderness of La Verna, Tuscany, in order to share in Christ's suffering. As the story goes, a seraph in the form of a crucified man appeared and left Francis imprinted with Christ's wounds until the end of his life two years later. The stigmatisation of St Francis is the first recorded incident of this kind in the Christian tradition. It was an important moment for monasticism (La Verna is an active monastery to this day) and this exhibition looks at images of St Francis, in print and paint, from the late 15th to mid-18th centuries. These include a German woodcut (above) from circa 1500–10, showing St Francis receiving the stigmata,
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
From 25 February to 8 July 2018.



WASHINGTON DC
Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice across Asia

Buddhist art from a diverse range of Asian countries has been brought together for this exhibition, which considers how sacred objects and artworks are an integral part of Buddhism. More than 250 remarkable artefacts, including a 14th-century, gilt-copper Buddha from central Tibet (above), are on display. They reveal the power they embody and the relationships between objects, people and ritual. This exhibition also contains two experiential spaces. One is the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room from the Alice S Kandell Collection, in which many objects are displayed as they would be in the shrine of a noble family.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
Until October 2020.

FRANCE


LENS
Italian Paintings from Northern France: Dialogues and Connections

This exhibition features some 20 Italian paintings that are held in collections in Picardy and the Nord-Pas-de-Calais exploring connecting links between 16th- to 18th-century artists. Among the highlights is a charming, 16th-century oil on panel showing Charity (above) from the workshop of Francesco Salviati (1510–63). The exhibition in the Lens Glass Pavilion comes at the end of the Heures italiennes series that has been held throughout 2017 in the Hauts-de-France region.
Musée du Louvre-Lens
+33 (0) 32 11 86 321
(www.louvrelens.fr)
From 18 October 2017 to
28 May 2018.

PARIS
Pago Pago: Latiff Mohidin (1960–1969)

A collaboration between the Centre Pompidou and National Gallery Singapore has brought the work of one of southeast Asia's foremost Modernists to Paris. After training in West Berlin, Malaysian artist Latiff Mohidin returned to southeast Asia in 1964; Pagoda II (below) dates from this year. This exhibition looks at the artist's time in Europe and his Pago Pago series, created in the 1960s as he tried to capture his sense of the region in paint and poetry.
Centre Pompidou
+33 (0)1 44 78 12 33
(www.centrepompidou.fr)
Until 28 May 2018.

PARIS
The Epic of The Suez Canal: From the Pharaohs to the 21st century
The Suez Canal was constructed between 1859 and 1869 to connect the Mediterranean and the Red Sea. An impressive feat of engineering it has had an historic impact on travel and trade in the region. This exhibition explores the long history of the canal and related themes in Egypt, from the pharaohs up to the 2015 inauguration of the Suez Canal extension, through archaeological finds, photographs, scale models and archival film footage.
Institut du monde arabe
+33 1 40 51 38 38
(www.imarabe.org)
From 28 March to 5 August 2018.


PARIS
Delacroix (1798–1863)
For this comprehensive tour of the career of one of France's finest painters, more than 180 works by Eugène Delacroix are on show. They include his early works, exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1820, historic and mythological scenes, such as his Medée furieuse, 1838 (above), and his later religious and landscape compositions. The paintings reflect Delacroix's consciousness of his place in art history, pursuing individuality while at the same time following 16th- and 17th-century Flemish and Venetian artists.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 29 March to 23 July 2018.

PARIS
Guernica
On 26 April 1937, the Basque town of Guernica was destroyed by aerial bombing during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso created his painting Guernica for the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne that same year. The vast and haunting monochrome canvas, which captures the chaos and violence of war, evoking pity and terror, has been reproduced across the world. The iconic painting is
on loan from the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía with a number of related sketches, and the exhibition tells the story of the creation of the work and the impact of the Spanish Civil War on Picasso.
Musée national Picasso-Paris
+33 1 85 56 00 36
(www.museepicassoparis.fr)
From 27 March to 29 July 2018.

PARIS
Ghosts and Hells: The Underworld in Asian Art
Focusing on ghost stories from China, Thailand and Japan, this exhibition takes a look at how the spirit world has manifested itself down the centuries in religious art, Hokusai prints, theatre, cinema, contemporary design, Magma creations and, even, Pac Man. Visitors will meet a wide range of spirits, including cat-women, the hungry spirits of the dead, jumping vampires, and yokai (supernatural creatures from Japanese folklore).
Musée du quai branly – Jacques Chirac
+33 1 56 61 70 0
(www.quaibranly.fr)
From 10 April to 15 July 2018.

PARIS
Before the Incas: Gods and Kings in Ancient Peru

The Inca is perhaps the best-known pre-Columbian civilisation, but this exhibition casts a light on its less well-known predecessors – the Cupisnique, Moche, Chimú and Lambayeque of northern Peru. Featuring ceramics, jewellery in gold and silver, leatherwork, grave goods, and more, some 300 works reveal the richness of these pre-Inca cultures and their influence on the societies that followed.
Musée du quai Branly–Jacques Chirac
+33 1 56 61 70 0
(www.quaibranly.fr)
Until 1 April 2018.

MEXICO
MEXICO CITY
Sean Scully – San Cristóbal

Luis Barragán's 1966 modernist equestrian and residential complex Cuadra San Cristóbal is hosting its first exhibition. Recent sculptures by Sean Scully in Cor-Ten and painted steel have been installed in a display that highlights the abstract artist's relationship with architecture and celebrates his links with Mexico, a country that he first saw in 1981 and has returned to repeatedly since, visits that inspired his Wall of Light series of paintings.
Cuadra San Cristóbal
(www.blainsouthern.com)
Until 24 March 2018.

NETHERLANDS


AMSTERDAM
High Society

Portraiture is one way in which the rich and powerful project their status. Commissioning the finest artists comes at a price as do the high-end garments the sitters wear. This exhibition brings together full length, life-size standing portraits of princes, aristocrats and other prominent and wealthy individuals – from the 16th to the 20th centuries. This standardise, but potent, format was adopted by the likes of Veronese, Velázquez, Reynolds, Gainsborough, Sargent, Munch and Manet. Highlights include Rembrandt's recently restored wedding portraits of Marten Soolmans and Oopjen Coppit and Cranach the Elder's depiction of the sumptuously dressed Henry the Pious, Duke of Saxony, 1514 (above). A concurrent exhibition of prints and drawings, called Guilty Pleasures, takes a peek at the privates lives of high society and their sometimes illicit entertainments of reckless gambling, excessive drinking, wild partying and visiting brothels.
Rijksmuseum
+31 20 674 7000
(www.rijksmuseum.nl)
From 8 March to 3 June 2018.

SPAIN


BILBAO
Art and Space

In the 1960s Basque artist Eduardo Chillida and German philosopher Martin Heidegger collaborated together and, in 1969, published an artist's book entitled Art and Space, featuring an essay by Heidegger with images by Chillida. Using this partnership as a starting point, the exhibition looks at concepts of place, presence and science in abstraction over the past 50 or so years, through such artists as the Brazilian Ernesto Neto and American Bruce Nauman, with his Green Light Corridor of 1970 (above).
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 15 April 2018.

BILBAO
Henri Michaux: The Other Side
Active throughout most of the 20th century, Henri Michaux (1899–1984) was celebrated by the likes of André Gide and Francis Bacon, both as a poet and as a painter. As the art, documents and objects on show here reveal, he had a great interest in the human figure, the alphabet, and the altered psyche, experimenting with hallucinogenic substances to create pieces which established him as a leading figure in the emergent psychedelic culture.
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 13 May 2018.

MADRID
Sorolla and Fashion

Spanish artist Joaquín Sorolla (1863–1923) was a keen portraitist, with an eye for and interest in fashion; so he became a chronicler of the changing trends and fashions of his time. In his female portraits, from 1890 to 1920 in particular, he depicts stylish dresses, jewellery and accessories. The paintings in this show are complemented by a display of outfits from the period.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 27 May 2018.

SWITZERLAND



ZURICH
Nasca, Peru: Searching for Traces in the Desert

The Nazca Desert in southern Peru is home to many enormous geoglyphs, up to 370 metres in length and known as the Nazca Lines. Archaeologists believe they were created by the Nazca culture between circa 200 BC and circa AD 650. But who were these ancient people? An extraordinary array of around 200 artefacts, some from recent excavations and all from Peruvian collections, offers a comprehensive look at Nazca culture. Ceramic vessels in the form of hybrid creatures, such as a painted bottle in the shape of an orca (above), colourful textiles, found in graves, and gold masks all shed light on the daily life of the Nazca, their gods and the rituals associated with the Nazca Lines.
Museum Rietberg
+41 (0)44 415 31 31
(www.rietberg.ch)
Until 15 April 2018.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
LONDON
Accordia Lectures:
The Nuragic statuary of Monte Prama in Iron Age Sardinia

Carlo Tronchetti
Joint Lecture with the Institute of Classical Studies
20 March, 5.30pm
Room G22/26, Senate House

Late Antique diptychs and their use in Carolingian Italy
Cristina La Rocca
Joint Lecture with the UCL Institute of Archaeology
8 May, 5.30pm
Room 612, UCL Institute of Archaeology
(www.ucl.ac.uk/accordia/)

Ancient Philosophy Seminars 2017–18
Why Socrates' legs don't run off to Megara: Moral Deliberation
in Plato's Crito
Ellisif Wasmuth
12 March

Plato on ruling and being ruled
Amanda Greene
26 March

Seminars organised by the Institute of Classical Studies are held Mondays 4.30–6.30pm
Room 243, Senate House.
(ics.sas.ac.uk/events)

Chosen Ancestors: Seamus Heaney and Virgil
Held in honour of the late poet and UCL professor AE Housman, the 2018 Housman Lecture will be given by Bernard O'Donoghue, Emeritus Fellow of Wadham College Oxford. In his talk he will focus on Seamus Heaney's posthumously published 'poetic remaking' of Book 6 of Virgil's Aeneid and its influence on his last collection of poems, Human Chain, in the context of the work of poets of the past, from Dante to Osip Mandelstam, WB Yeats and Ted Hughes.

UCL
14 March, 6pm
(www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/events/2017/2018-HousmanLecture)

Classical Archaeology in the Modern Middle East: Experiences and Responses

The Ghost of Palmyra Yet-to-Come? Exploring Memory, People and Place in Post-Conflict Reconstruction
Zena Kamash
7 March

'Hello! is it (not) me you are looking for?' The Many Local Communities of Middle Eastern Living Heritage Sites
Heba Abd el Gawad
14 March

The Institute of Classical Studies Classical Archaeology and Art Seminars in 2018 are held on
Mondays at 4.30pm

Room 329, Senate House.
(ics.sas.ac.uk/events)

Medieval Seminar Series 2017–2018
UCL Institute of Archaeology and British Museum

Discovering the Northern Picts: Kingship and Society in Northeast Scotland circa AD 300–1000
Gordon Noble
20 March, 6pm

Room 612, UCL Institute of Archaeology
(www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/calendar/events)

Mistaken Identities: Roman Emperors in Modern Art
Professor Mary Beard will deliver King's College London's 2018 Rumble Lecture in Classical Art, discussing how some modern artists have re-imagined and, at times, misidentified Roman emperors in their work.

Bush House Auditorium,
King's College London
14 March, 6.30pm
(www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/eventrecords/2017-2018/CHS/Rumble-Fund-Lecture-2018.aspx)

Ten Days Six Nights
The second annual BMW Tate Live Exhibition will take place in the Tanks and will include performances and installations by Joan Jonas, and performances by Sylvia Palacios and Turner Prize-winner Mark Leckey.
16–25 March

Tate Modern, The Tanks
(www.tate.org.uk)

LINDISFARNE, Northumberland
DigNation

Lindisfarne is the chosen venue for the first DigNation festival this year. Organised by a crowd-funding initiative called DigVentures in memory of Time Team archaeologist Mick Aston, this event includes two days of excavations, a keynote talk by Tony Robinson, lectures and other activities. Those unable to attend in person will be able to access a 'virtual festival' online.
22–23 September
(digventures.com/projects/dignation/)

OXFORD
Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama (APGRD)

Public Lecture
Tragedy's Endurance
Erika Fischer-Lichte
5 March, 3pm

Ioannou Centre Lecture Theatre
(www.apgrd.ox.ac.uk/events)

The Classsical Art Research Centre (CARC)
Saving Mes Aynak

Brent E Huffman's award-winning documentary highlights the threat copper-mining brings to this Silk Road site (near Kabul, Afghanistan) and its ancient Buddhist art. Part of the Gandhara Connections project, the screening of the film is followed by an interview with the director.
8 March, 5–7pm

Ioannou Centre
(www.carc.ox.ac.uk/events)

NETHERLANDS


MAASTRICHT
TEFAF Maastricht
Presenting 7000 years of art history, dealers and experts in ancient art, design, paintings, works on paper, tribal art and more, will all be taking part in the 31st edition of this leading art and antiques fair. Among those offering antiquities are: Cahn International AG, Charles Ede (whose stand features an over life-size Hellenistic head of a youth), Galerie Harmakhis and Rupert Wace Ancient Art (whose exhibits include a Hellenistic marble seated figure of the goddess of healing, Hygeia).

There will be works inspired by the ancient world, too. Tomasso Brothers Fine Art's stand, for instance, is on a Roman theme, with works ranging in date from antiquity to the Neoclassical period, including Giovanni Battista Cipriani's large oil painting of Castor and Pollux (right), commissioned in 1783 by George Walpole for Houghton Hall.

This year, TEFAF Maastricht's loan exhibition will showcase the Amsterdam Museum's newly restored The Headmen of the Longbow Civic Guard House, 1653, by Bartholomeus van der Helst, with examples of 16th-century silverware (depicted in the painting) displayed alongside. Five further recently restored 'Golden Age' group portraits will also be on show, including two by Ferdinand Bol.
MECC (Maastricht Exhibition & Congress Centre)
10–18 March 2018
(www.tefaf.com)

 

 

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