Events


UNITED KINGDOM
UNITED KINGDOM


CAMBRIDGE

Designers and Jewellery 1850–1940: Jewellery & Metalwork from The Fitzwilliam Museum Showcasing a various 19th-century and 20th-century styles from the Fitzwilliam's extensive collections of jewellery and metalwork, this exhibition celebrates the work of leading craftspeople, such as Castellani, Giuliano, Robert Phillips, John Brogden and William Burgess. One splendidly designed Egyptian revival brooch (above) made of gold and white gold, with blue, green and red cloisonné, set with a moonstone carved into a Pharaonic head, was made by renowned London jewellers Watherston & Son, circa 1906.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0) 1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 11 November 2018.


DEDHAM, Essex
Munnings and the River

In the 250th anniversary year of the Royal Academy, this exhibition takes a look at a less familiar aspect of the career of one of its presidents – Sir Alfred Munnings. He is best known for his equestrian and sporting scenes but, here, his landscapes are in the spotlight. Rivers provided a backdrop for most of the artist's life, from his childhood home in a watermill to his later residence near the Stour in Dedham, and it is these natural features that flow through his landscape paintings, such as Tagg's Island 1919 (above) on the Thames.
Munnings Museum
+44 (0)1206 322127
(www.munningsmuseum.org.uk)
Until 31 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
Rembrandt: Britain's Discovery of the Master

The status of Rembrandt (1606–69) as one of the leading figures of the Dutch Golden Age is well secured, and the story of the appreciation and admiration for the artist in Britain, from the 1630s to the present, is a fascinating one. His portraits and landscapes were particularly popular in Britain and he was at the height of his popularity in the 18th century. Exploring both the history of collecting andRembrandt's influence on the imagination, this exhibition brings together major works by the Dutch artist and by later artists in Britain that he inspired, from Hogarth and Reynolds to Epstein, Paolozzi and Auerbach.
Scottish National Gallery
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 14 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
Canaletto and the Art of Venice

Over 100 paintings, drawings, and prints by Canaletto (1697–1768) and his contemporaries show how they captured the allure of Venice. Not only did they meticulously record the vibrancy of the city around them, they also developed the capriccio, architectural fantasies conjuring up Classical ruins, which can be seen in Canaletto's A Capriccio View with Ruins, circa 1742–44 (above), Marco Riccis's Caprice View with Roman Ruins, circa 1729, and Landscape with Classical Ruins, Cattle and Figures, circa 1741–42, by Francesco Zuccarelli. All these paintings come from the Royal Collection. They were acquired by George III from Joseph Smith (circa 1674−1770), an English merchant and later British Consul in Venice. The king, a great patron of the arts, bought almost all Smith's collection in 1762, an acquisition that has made the Royal Collection one of the pre-eminent collections of 18th-century Venetian art in the world containing the largest number of works by Canaletto.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 11 May to 21 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
Emil Nolde: Colour is Life

The German Expressionist Emil Nolde (1867–1956) was the single figure most heavily featured in the Degenerate Art exhibition of 1937 in Munich, where 33 of his works were displayed. Although he had joined the Nazi party, they still confiscated more than 1000 of his paintings. So, unable to work as a professional artist, he created his 'unpainted pictures', in the form of vibrant watercolours. This show surveys Nolde's career through these turbulent times with these watercolours displayed alongside his paintings, drawings and prints.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
From 14 July to 21 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
Raqib Shaw: Reinventing the Old Masters
The Old Masters offer inspiration for many, and Raqib Shaw, whose vast but intricate works are created in enamels with a porcupine quill, is no exception. Shaw's work is on show alongside earlier paintings from the National Galleries of Scotland collection that have influenced him. Examples include: Lucas Cranach's An Allegory of Melancholy, 1528, and Joseph Noel Paton's The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania, 1849.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until Sunday 28 October 2018.

LIVERPOOL
Beautiful world, where are you?

In the 10th Liverpool Biennial, over 40 artists from 22 countries grapple with social, environmental and political uncertainty in the world today – as evoked by the words of the 18th-century German poet Friedrich Schiller: 'Beautiful world, where are you?' Artist Mohamed Bourouissa showcases an Algerian-inspired 'healing' garden, while Dale Harding, a descendant of the Bidjara, Ghungalu and Garingbal peoples of Australia, uses wall paintings to engage with the untold histories of his communities, as in Ngaya boonda yinda nayi yoolgoogoo/ I carry you in my heart, 2016 (above).
Venues across Liverpool
+44 (0)151 709 7444
(www.biennial.com)
From 14 July to 28 October 2018.

LIVERPOOL
Egon Schiele/Francesca Woodman

Drawings by the early 20th-century Austrian Expressionist artsist Egon Schiele, who died 100 years ago, and photographs by the later American artist Francesca Woodman (1958–81) together demonstrate innovative approaches to capturing movement through dynamic compositions. Both artists created intimate nude portraits and self-portraits with the focus on emotional intensity – Schiele used quick, sharp lines and Woodman used long exposures.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 24 May to 23 September 2018.

LONDON
The Past is Present: Becoming Egyptian in the 20th Century

As Egypt underwent great changes in the 20th century, the nation looked to its past. This latest display, sponsored by Japanese publisher Asahi Shimbun, focuses on how motifs from the ancient world were repurposed in modern times. Objects collected through the museum's Modern Egypt project – including a 1960s milk-bottle with a Cleopatra logo (above), pasta and cigarette packaging with pyramid designs, posters, and signs – that all show how Ancient Egypt was present in both public and private life during the 20th century as a visual culture distinct from European Egyptomania.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 30 September 2018.

LONDON
Empire of the Sikhs
The Sikh Empire (1799–1849) under the one-eyed 'Napoleon of the East' Maharaja Ranjit Singh stretched across much of Pakistan and northwest India and was both an ally and opponent of the British. Splendid jewellery, weaponry and personal items belonging to Ranjit Singh and his family tell the story of the Empire and its annexation as well as the British acquisition of the Koh-i-Noor diamond.
Brunei Gallery, SOAS
+44 (0)20 7898 4915
(www.soas.ac.uk/gallery)
Until 23 September 2018.

LONDON
London in its Original Splendour
The latest contemporary art show above Roman London's temple of Mithras sees Argentinian artist Pablo Bronstein cover the gallery space in 3D-rendered wallpaper that draws inspiration from the history of the site. Whether drawing, choreography or performance, Bronstein's work focuses on imagined architecture, and this installation (above) presents a fantasy view of the architecture of London based on archaeological artefacts from the Mithraeum and the nearby designs by Christopher Wren, John Soane, Edwin Lutyens, and James Stirling.
London Mithraeum Bloomberg SPACE
+44 (0)20 7330 7500
(www.londonmithraeum.com/bloomberg-space)
Until 12 January 2019.

LONDON
Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cezanne

A mile down the road from the National Gallery, the Courtauld Gallery is closing this September for a major redevelopment. But works from their collection will be on show in an exhibition at the National Gallery uniting purchases made by the Gallery through the Samuel Courtauld Fund with the Impressionist acquisitions of
Samuel Courtauld (1876–1947). The exhibition examines how the industrialist built up his collection, from the first Impressionist exhibition to the death of his wife Elizabeth in 1931, when he stopped buying paintings; and how he influenced the formation of the national collections and the acceptance in Britain of modern art. Highlights include: Manet's A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, Toulouse-Lautrec's Jane Avril in the Entrance to the Moulin Rouge, and Cézanne's Still Life with Plaster Cupid, circa 1894 (above).
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 17 September 2018 to
20 January 2019.


LONDON
Oceania
The Royal Academy of Arts was founded 250 years ago, in 1768, the year of Captain James Cook's first Pacific expedition on the Endeavour. Marking these two anniversaries, the RA is staging the UK's first major survey of Oceanic art, with some 200 works spanning over 500 years and nearly a third of the world's surface, from New Guinea to Easter Island, Hawaii to New Zealand. With an eye on the history of the region and present-day issues, the exhibition celebrates the rich and diverse cultures of Oceania and explores three key themes: voyaging and water, place-making and settlement, and encounter, trade and exchange. Highlights include extraordinary works such as cloaks made of feathers, carved canoe paddles, ceremonial bowls and wooden carvings, including the Ta Moko panel, 1896-99 (above) by Tene Waitere, one of the most important Maori sculptors.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8027
(royalacademy.org.uk)
From 29 September to
10 December 2018.

LONDON
Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire

An influential figure in American landscape painting and founder of the Hudson River School, the British-born artist Thomas Cole (1801–48) travelled England and Italy and engaged actively with European art of the time. Cole's grand cycle of paintings entitled The Course of Empire will be on show, reflecting his interest in enhanced scenic ruins – a good example of this is Aqueduct near Rome, 1832 (above) – and his dialogue with other artists such as JMW Turner and John Constable. National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 11 June to 7 October 2018.

LONDON
Ed Ruscha: Course of Empire

Presenting a very different view of progress and the cyclical nature of civilisation to that of Cole's The Course of Empire Series (displayed concurrently) is Ed Ruscha's 2005 series of American landscapes that feature the industrial buildings of Los Angeles. Ruscha's Course of Empire is shown in its entirety for the first time since its debut at the 51st Venice Biennale.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 11 June to 7 October 2018.

LONDON
Splendours of the Subcontinent: Four Centuries of South Asian Paintings and Manuscripts

During the 17th century, when the newly formed East India Company was bringing South Asian exports
to Britain, the Mughal empire was flourishing. Exquisite paintings and manuscripts portray the Mughal court at the time, and a number of these, presented to George III, are now held in the Royal Library at Windsor Castle. The collection grew as the East India Company rose in prominence and continually gifted manuscripts to the monarch. Queen Victoria received many illuminated letters, paintings, manuscripts and books from India, including a volume of her journals translated into Hindi. Her Hindustani diaries and phrase book will be on show too, giving a glimpse of her studies with her secretary Abdul Karim. Pictured above is Queen Tissarakshita, 1911, by Abanindranath Tagore (1871–1951), founder of the Indian Society of Oriental Art.
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 8 June to 14 October 2018.

LONDON
Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up

With her brightly coloured clothing and disticntive eyebrows the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907–54) cultivated a highly individual look that can be seen in her self-portraits. This is the first exhibition, outside Mexico, to show her most intimate possessions, including her medical corsets and prosthetics, displayed with photographs of her including Frida with Olmec figurine, 1939 (above), jewellery and letters, which reveal how she proudly drew on Mexican traditions in her Covoacán home, the Blue House.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 16 June to 4 November 2018.


LONDON
Fashioned from Nature

Exploring the relationship between fashion and nature since 1600, including camouflage, such as the 1998 design for a suit by Richard James (above), this exhibition shows work by Stella McCartney, Christopher Raeburn and Vivienne Westwood. It also highlights the challenges of sustainability in the fashion industry and showcases some of the research and cutting-edge processes involved.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 27 January 2019.



LONDON

Michael Jackson: On the Wall
With more than a billion records sold and still rising, nearly a decade after his death, the American super star Michael Jackson has gained icon status. His videos, choreography and individual style have all helped secure his legacy, shown in this exhibition. Many artists were drawn to Jackson including: Andy Warhol, who made a portrait of Jackson in 1984 (above), Grayson Perry, David LaChapelle, Rita Ackermann, Louise Lawler and Catherine Opie, whose works are featured in this show.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0) 20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
Until 21 October 2018.



LONDON
Prince and Patron
As the Prince of Wales will soon turn 70, the summer opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace will feature a celebratory display of more than 100 works chosen by him. This varied selection includes his favourites from among the Royal Collection – such as Johan Joseph Zoffany's painting The Tribuna of the Uffizi, 1772–77, and Napoleon's felt and silk cloak (above). There are also pieces from his personal collection, such as a portrait of the Queen by Michael Noakes, as well as works by young artists from The Royal Drawing School and The Prince's School of Traditional Arts, and also Turquoise Mountain, an organisation that promotes sustainable urban regeneration and the revival of traditional crafts in Afghanistan, Myanmar and the Middle East.
State Rooms, Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)20 7766 7300
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 21 July to 30 September 2018.

LONDON
Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art
In 1960, MoMA hosted a milestone photography exhibition titled The Sense of Abstraction. Now, nearly 60 years on, Tate Modern picks up the thread and examines the role of photography in abstract art from the 1910s through to the present, featuring a series by Man Ray (1890–1976) on display for the first time since the MoMA show. The varied works exhibited reflect how techniques in both painting and photography have developed over the decades. Among them are works by the American Imogen Cunningham (1883–1976), who sought abstraction from the human body in Triangle, 1928 (above), and Marta Hoepffner (1912–2000), from Germany, who responded directly to the abstract painter in Homage to Kandinsky, 1937 (above).
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 14 October 2018.

LONDON
The Future Starts Here
This exhibition delves into the emerging technologies and pioneering designs that will transform our homes, cities and the environment of the future. The projects include: a global seed-bank to preserve plant species in case of an ecological or other disaster; a shirt that can charge a smartphone and Protei (above) which is an autonomous sailing ship that helps in the cleaning up of oil spills.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 4 November 2018.

LONDON
Sir Richard Wallace: The Collector
On the bicentenary of his birth, the Wallace Collection takes a close look at its philanthropic founder and prolific collector, Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess of Hertford, who was brought up by his grandmother in Paris. His intriguing personal life and his impressive legacy are all explored in works collected by Sir Richard and displayed in the museum's new exhibition space.
Wallace Collection
+44 (0)207 563 9500
(wallacecollection.org)
Until 6 January 2019.



OXFORD
Spellbound: Magic, Ritual & Witchcraft

Visitors entering this exhibition can choose whether or not they will walk under a ladder. They will then face questions about the role of 'magic' in their daily lives. The use of talismans reveals a fascinating range of artefacts reflecting magical practices from the 12th century to the present day. Among them is an intricate brass prognosticator, circa AD 1500 (above), which was used to calculate propitious times for blood-letting, according to the position of the moon. Crystal balls, and books of spells are displayed alongside poignant accounts of witch trials and prosecutions, including that of Helen Duncan in 1944, who was imprisoned for nine months under the Witchcraft Act of 1735 (which was not repealed until 1951). There are also gruesome objects on show, such as a pierced bull's heart, just one of thousands kept in houses for protection.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

OXFORD
From Sappho to Suffrage: Women Who Dared
An important anniversary being celebrated this year is the centenary of the Representation of the People Act of 1918, which gave the vote to British women over the age of 30, with a property qualification. Marking 100 years
of women's suffrage, the Bodleian is highlighting the remarkable achievements of women who defied expectations, from pirates and explorers to suffragettes, and going as far back as the poet Sappho.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
From 6 March 2018 to
3 February 2019.

ST IVES, Cornwall
Patrick Heron

Recently named the Art Fund's Museum of the Year 2018, Tate St Ives is exploring more than 50 years of work by the British artist Patrick Heron (1920–99) in its new top-lit gallery. Colour remained a key concern throughout Heron's career, but his abstractions, best seen in his ambitious, expansive paintings, demonstrate how he responded to everyday light and shapes. Although he never depicted the garden and landscape around his Cornwall home and studio, these spaces have left their mark
on his work.
Tate St Ives
+44 (0)1736 796 226
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 30 September 2018.

WADDESDON
Michael Eden: Form & Transform

Historical objects from Waddesdon's remarkable collection are given a new lease of life by Michael Eden
as he reinterprets them using digital technology. His 25 new works address the relationship between different styles over time, and the practice of imitating materials that he demonstrates in a quasi-Classical manner in After Le Lorrain, 2018 (detail, above)
Coach House Gallery
Waddesdon Manor
+44 (0)1296 820414
(www.waddesdon.org.uk/michael-eden)
Until 21 October 2018.

WOODSTOCK
Yves Klein

Known for inventing the wonderful ultramarine pigment International Klein Blue, work by Yves Klein (1928–1962)
is always eye-catching, as this exhibition of more than 50 pieces shows. The French artist embraced experimentation, and his influence is felt on minimalism, conceptual and performance art.
Blenheim Palace
+44 (0)1993 810530
(www.blenheimpalace.com)
From 18 July to
7 October 2018.

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
10,000 Miles along the Yangzi River The Yangzi is the longest river in Asia, and the majesty of this natural wonder
is under the spotlight in an immersive installation of a Chinese painted handscroll, more than 15 metres in length. 10,000 Miles along the Yangzi River, also known as Ten Thousand Li up the Yangtze River (above), was painted by court artist Wang Hui over a seven-month period during his retirement in 1699. Water, birds, boats, fishermen and mountains, all rendered by fine brushwork, fill the scroll, which draws deeply upon China's rich artistic and poetic traditions.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 30 September 2018.


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Collecting Stories: Native American Art

Although Native American art formed part of the MFA's founding collections, the Navajo weavings, and items such as Plains Indians' beadwork and Zuni Pueblo pottery, like this Olla, or water-jar, 1820–40 (above), that entered the museum in its early days, are rarely seen. Now they have been put under the spotlight in this examination of the history of Native American art in the museum's holdings and displays.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 10 March 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
Artists and Their Books/Books and Their Artists
The book is a somewhat overlooked part of a creative artist's output, but now they take centre stage in this exhibition of striking examples from the Getty Research Institute's Special Collections. Working on the boundary between traditional books and contemporary works of art, artists' books offer an opportunity to experiment and challenge tradition. They can use a variety of materials and either be displayed on a wall or shown as sculpture. The can also take on a wide range of shapes that can be opened, unpacked or unfolded, and so read in different ways. One example is Barbara Fahrner and Daniel E Kelm's The Philosopher's Stone, 1992 (above) a geometric paper egg, that reveals alchemical adages when the corners are turned down. Other works on display are by artists who specialise in books, such as Tauba Auerbach, Dieter Roth and Felicia Rice, and those known for their work in sculpture, painting or performance art, including Ellsworth Kelly,
Anselm Kiefer, Barbara T Smith
and Wei Tan.
Getty Research Institute
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 28 October 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
In Focus: Expressions

In the early days of photography, lengthy exposure times meant that smiling was not the norm when posing for the camera. This all changed in the 1880s when faster film and hand-held cameras came into use, and a beaming smile was soon championed by advertisers as a clear sign of customer satisfaction. As well as tracing how photography can capture human expressions, be they staged, candidly caught in the moment or sometimes open to (mis)interpretation, this exhibition considers the role of the mask in images and physiognomy.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 7 October 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh

When Howard Carter found 'wonderful things' inside the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, the world was captivated. Now, a large number of these 'wonderful things' are on a world tour, starting in Los Angeles. Sculptures, a gilded wooden bed, jewellery, and more are used to trace Tutankhamun's story –from his death and journey through the underworld to immortality in this world and the next.
California Science Center
+1 323-724-3623 (www.californiasciencecenter.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota
Horse Nation of the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ

Horses have played an important role in societies across the world, and they continue to be revered by the Dakhóta, Nakhóta, and Lakhóta people – known as the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Seven Council Fires) – who regard them as relatives and an essential part of the community, as well as their allies in battle or in hunting. Paintings, textiles, film and beadwork by leading contemporary Native American artists, such as Preston Neal's Horse with Yankton Sioux Mask, 2016 (above), show how this noble animal can influence history, spirituality and culture.
Minneapolis Institute of Art
+1 888 642 2787
(new.artsmia.org)
Until 3 February 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s

In the years during and following the Second World War, the United States underwent great cultural and social change, as can be seen in high-quality, yet inexpensive and quick, studio portrait photography. Displaying part of an important recent acquisition by the Met, this exhibition sets out to explore mid- 20th-century African-American self-expression through photography, although like the photographers, many of the sitters remain unidentified. They include soldiers and sailors in uniforms, graduates in caps and gowns, and new parents with their babies and children.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 8 October 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Nedjemankh and His Gilded Coffin
Nedjemankh was a high-ranking Egyptian priest of the ram-headed god Heryshef of Herakleopolis in upper Egypt. When he died in the 1st century BC he was buried in a spectacular, richly decorated, gilded coffin. Recently acquired by the Met, it is now the centrepiece of an exhibition that brings together other artefacts from the museum's extensive Egyptian collections, adding detail, setting his role as a priest, putting his burial and the ornamentation of his coffin in context. The show examines how the coffin's scenes and texts, in thick gesso relief, protect and guide Nedjemankh as he journeyed into the afterlife. The use of gold, which assists with rebirth in the next life, contrasts with the thin sheets of silver foil on the interior of the lid. This pairing is associated with the flesh and bones of the gods, the sun and the moon, and the eyes
of Heryshef.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 21 April 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix
Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) is best known for his large-scale French Romantic paintings that recreate historic
scenes, but his skill and output as a draughtsman is also a significant part of his work. More than 100 works on paper – selected from the Karen B Cohen collection that was gifted to the Met – include finished watercolours, sketchbooks, copies after Old Master prints and preparatory drawings for his celebrated paintings; such as Crouching Tiger, 1839 (above). All these are evidence of his commitment to reaching the full expressive potential of his craft.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 17 July to 12 November 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination

Staged at The Met Fifth Avenue and at The Met Cloisters, this exhibition brings together Vatican vestments, medieval art and modern women's wear to investigate the influence of the high church on high fashion. Among the many world-famous designers featured are: Cristobal Balenciaga, Coco Chanel, Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana, Jean Paul Gaultier, Jeanne Lanvin, Yves Saint Laurent, Elsa Schiaparelli and Donatella Versace.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
(The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters)
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 10 May to 8 October 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
The Second Buddha: Master of Time

The legends of Padmasambhava, who is believed to have played a vital role in converting Tibet to Buddhism, see him overcome obstacles, liberate himself from life and death, and blur notions of time. Works from the 13th to the 20th century (and new interactive technology) tell the story of this key figure, hailed by Tibetans as 'The Second Buddha', with a focus on the links between past and future for establishing identity and projecting teachings forward for a more enlightened time.
Rubin Museum of Art
+1 212 620 5000
(www.rubinmuseum.org)
Until 7 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art
Although frightening, the deadly gorgon Medusa is often portrayed as beautiful and feminine rather than grotesque. This fascinating shift in visual representation first started in the 5th century BC, when other female mythical creatures, including sphinxes, sirens and Scylla, underwent a similar transformation. Art from the Classical world and beyond is used to explore the relationship between beauty and fear, and how the ancient femme fatale combined erotic desire, violence and death, and became a model for the late 19th-century reactions to women's empowerment.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.


SAN FRANCISCO, California
Truth and Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelites and the Old Masters

Edward Burne-Jones, who designed the tapestry Pomona (above), joined Dante Gabriel Rosetti, William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais to form the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 . This was a rebellion against the aesthetic values of the Royal Academy and its first president Sir Joshua Reynolds. As the name suggests the Pre-Raphaelites looked for inspiration before the time of Raphael, in the masterpieces of medieval and Renaissance art for inspiration. Work by Italian Old Masters such as Fra Angelico, Botticelli (who was 'rediscovered' in England in the 19th century), as well as Raphael, and Veronese will be displayed alongside the sumptuous 19th-century works they influenced. The angular postures, symbolic detail and rich colour palettes of the Pre-Raphaelites also evoke early Netherlandish art, including panels by Van Eyck and Hans Memling, which Rossetti and Holman Hunt admired in Bruges in 1849.
Legion of Honor
+1 415 750 3600
(legionofhonor.famsf.org)
Until 30 September 2018.



WASHINGTON DC
Water, Wind, and Waves: Marine Paintings from the Dutch Golden Age

With its many canals and great maritime trading tradition, the Netherlands has always been a master of both the high seas and the low country. This is reflected in the art of the Dutch Golden Age, with paintings, drawings, prints, rare books and an extraordinary set of intricate ship models, which all chart the multifaceted relationship between people and water in daily life; as is shown in works such as Hendrick Avercamp's A Scene on the Ice, circa 1625 (above). Water offered a place for recreation, whether for swimming in ponds, canals or rivers or, when frozen, skating, sleighing or playing games like kolf – golf on ice – in the harsh wintRANCEers of what was called the 'Little Ice Age', circa 1645–1715. Images of Dutch naval might, transport, and the economic assets of the Dutch East India and West India Companies are also on show. National Gallery of Art
+1 202 737 4215
(www.nga.gov)
Until 25 November 2018.

BELGIUM


BRUGES
Mummies in Bruges: Secrets of Ancient Egypt

Human and animal mummies, including the Mummy of Pawiamen, 700–650 BC (above), from the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden's collection are shown alongside statues, stelae, burial gifts, papyrus sheets from the Book of the Dead, magical amulets and scarabs, to bring to light ancient Egyptian ways of life, rituals, burial customs and beliefs about the afterlife. Scans of the mummies also virtually unwrap them to reveal the secrets of the mummification process.
Oud Sint-Jan Exhibition Centre
+32 50 47 61 00
(www.xpo-center-bruges.be)
Until 11 November 2018.
Until October 2020.

DENMARK


COPENHAGEN
Odilon Redon: Into the Dream

Over 150 works, including, Pegasus and the Hydra, circa 1907 (above) by French symbolist, graphic artist, and painter Odilon Redon (1840–1916) have been brought together for an immersive journey through his dreamlike and narrative-filled world. His art conveys his interest in both science and progress, and the inexplicable world of darkness, dreams and myths. Organised in collaboration with the Kröller-Müller Museum in Holland, the exhibition includes loans of works by Redon from a range of public and private collections in Europe and the USA. These are set alongside pieces that highlight his influences, such as painting by Pierre Bonnard and Van Gogh, and artefacts from ancient Egypt and ancient Greece. The music and literature that inspired Redon can be heard from 'soundposts' throughout the gallery.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.dk)
From 12 October 2018 to
20 January 2019.

FRANCE
LENS
Love

Love has been a plentiful source of inspiration for countless artists and writers since the first pens and paint brushes were ever employed. Through artworks from a number of cultures over time, this nuanced exhibition traces the history of what we see as love and romance, from ancient statuary to paintings by Fragonard and Delacroix, to free love and libertine behaviour. There has always been an intriguing concern with the powerful dangers of feminine seduction, whether by Pandora in ancient Greece or by Eve in the Garden of Eden. In contrast, divine female icons, such as the Virgin Mary, are worshipped. Romanticism and the rituals of courtship and marriage, the pleasures of the flesh and the equality of partners are all addressed through an array of art.
Louvre Lens
+33 3 21 18 62 62
(www.louvrelens.fr)
From 26 September 2018 to
21 January 2019.

NICE
Matisse and Picasso: The Comedy of the Model

As part of Picasso-Méditerranée (an international programme of events, running from 2017 to 2019, to show Picasso's Mediterranean works) the Musée Matisse in Nice is staging an exhibition that explores the dialogue between these two rival artists, who were both drawn to the city's sunny coastal setting and the landscape around it in the 1940s. With a focus on the relationship between the artists and their models, through paintings, sculptures and their graphic works, together with letters, photographs of their studios and other archival material, this show draws attention to both the similarities and differences between Picasso and Matisse and their creative competitiveness.
Musée Matisse de Nice
+33 4 93 81 08 08
(www.musee-matisse-nice.org)
Until 29 September 2018.

PARIS
Archaeology goes Graphic

The latest offering in the Petite Galerie, the Louvre's space devoted to art and cultural education for all, examines the relationship between archaeology and the art of the comic book, known in France as 'the 9th art'. With archaeological discoveries, such as a terracotta nude from 2340–1500 BC (above), and comics and drawings, visitors can learn about the work of the archaeologist from the 19th century onwards. Sketchbooks have their place in archaeology as in graphic art, but as well as this tool, the two subjects have more in common. While archaeologists are not the most frequent characters in comics, they do occasionally appear along with excavations and their spectacular discoveries, in imaginative illustrated stories that combine fact and fiction, mythical figures, places and objects.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 26 September 2018
to 1 July 2019.

PARIS
Jakuchu: The Colourful Kingdom of Living Beings
As part of Paris' Japonismes 2018 cultural programme, celebrating 160 years of diplomatic relations between France and Japan, the Petit Palais is mounting a special display of the entire series of 30 hanging scrolls called Dōshokusai-e (The Colourful Kingdom of Living Beings). It is the first time all 30 of the scrolls have been on show in Europe, and owing to their extreme fragility they will only be on view for one month. The scrolls are considered the masterpiece of Edo artist Itō Jakuchū who painted them, between 1757 and 1766, using subtle brushwork and vivid colours to capture cockerels, peacocks, fish, ducks, phoenixes and blossoming trees, with a great sense of realism and precision. A pious figure, Jakuchū donated the scrolls to the Shōkoku-ji Buddhist temple in Kyoto where they no longer hang. This presentation resembles the artist's original intention of how the work should be seen together.
Petit Palais
+33 1 53 43 40 00
(www.petitpalais.paris.fr/en)
From 15 September to
14 October 2018.

PARIS
Neanderthal
Neanderthals have received some bad press since the first discovery of a skull in Germany's Neander valley in 1856, but recent research is continuing to transform our ideasabout this species. With Neanderthal remains on show, such as this 60,000-year-old skull (above) from La Chapelle-aux-Saints, this exhibition explores changing public perception, depictions in the arts and latest scientific investigations.
Musée de l'Homme
+33 1 44 05 72 72
(www.museedelhomme.fr)
Until 7 January 2019.

PARIS
Diego Giacometti at the Musée Picasso
When the Musée National Picasso -Paris opened its doors at the Hôtel Salé in October 1985, as well as masterpieces by Picasso, it also presented a special commission by Giacometti. The last before his death in July 1985, it encompasses some 50 exclusively created pieces of furniture: benches, chairs, tables and lamps. The exhibition tells the story of the bronze and resin objects, and how they reflect the Swiss artist's interest in botany and ancient Greek and Etruscan sources, with which, he said, he aimed to create a 'geometry in the air'.
Musée National Picasso-Paris
+33 1 85 56 00 36
(www.museepicassoparis.fr)
Until 4 November 2018.


QATAR


UNITED STATES DOHA
Mohammed Melehi: 1959–1971

As one of Mathaf's 'Focus' exhibitions that explore the work of pioneering regional artists in the museum's permanent collection, this show will centre on Moroccan artist Mohammed Melehi (b 1936). Through a chronological survey of 13 of Melehi's works created during a period of life that saw him study in Rome, live in New York, and return to Morocco nine years after independence was restored, visitors will be able to trace his interest in the various ideological, scientific and political systems in a changing modern society. With colourful forms such as the wave, the circle and the square (above), Melehi explores the contrast between the artificial and organic, tradition and progress, East and West, and the Left and the Right in politics.
Mathaf: Arab Museum of
Modern Art
+974 4402 8855
(www.mathaf.org.qa/en/whats-on)
Until 25 September 2018.

UNITED STATES DOHA
Shakir Hassan Al Said: The Wall

Focusing on the output of Iraqi artist Shakir Hassan Al Said (1925–2004) from the early 1950s to the late 1990s, this exhibition looks at the progression of his work, in particular how he replaced landscape with geometry and body with form between the 1950s and 70s. Later figurative representations were replaced with texture and physicality. The artist used materials in highly experimental ways and even burned works to highlight the violence behind cultural destruction. This was his response to the Iraq–Iran war, the Gulf wars, the American invasion of Iraq and subsequent war. It was during this most recent conflict that the political and spiritual dimension of his work was at its strongest.
Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art
+974 4402 8855
(www.mathaf.org.qa/en/whats-on)
Until 25 September 2018.

RUSSIA


MOSCOW
Pearls: Treasures from the Seas and the Rivers

Naturally forming pearls, found in a range of colours, have been highly prized for many centuries and as a result incorporated into exquisite pieces of jewellery, whether earrings, tiaras, ropes of pearls or pendants. The rivers and lakes of Russia have yielded large quantities of freshwater pearls that are not widely known, but they adorned icons in churches and clothing for the nobility. Pearls are therefore an ideal subject for an exhibition as part of the Qatar-Russia 2018 Year of Culture, for which Qatar Museums has loaned an extraordinary collection of 100 pieces of pearl jewellery. Highlights include designs by Cartier and the dazzling tiara of Archduchess Marie-Valerie of Austria (above), made by Köchert circa 1913, and five other tiaras from European royal houses.
State Historical Museum
+7 495 692 40 19
(en.shm.ru)
Until 1 October 2018.

SPAIN


BILBAO
Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World

In 1989, the Tiananmen Square protest and the resulting military crackdown on the student protest movement marked the end of a decade of comparative political, intellectual and creative freedom in China – how did artists respond? With works by some 60 artists and groups from across the country and the rest of the world, this exhibition investigates artistic experimentation between 1989 and the 2008 Beijing Olympics, a period defined by great reforms, globalisation and the rise of China as a world power. The art on show includes performance, painting, photography, installation and video art, which deal with issues concerning the legacy of Chinese history, identity, equality, ideology and control. It shows the prominent role of dissident Chinese artists, such as Ai Weiwei, in the development of global contemporary art. His three gelatin silver prints Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn, 1995 (above) are included in the show.
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 23 September 2018.

MADRID
Monet/Boudin

While not as famous as Monet, (1840–1926), Eugène Boudin (1824–98) had a great influence on him. Paintings by both artists, who first met in 1856, shown side by side, reveal Boudin's impact on Monet in his formative years. Both were interested in the effects of light on water and were attracted by the wild coasts of Brittany and Normandy. Although their friendship began to cool in the 1870s, Boudin continued to admire Monet's work, such as A Seascape, Shipping by Moonlight, circa 1864 (above).
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 30 September 2018.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM


HARROGATE
The Northern Antiques Fair

More than 40 UK art and antique dealers are coming together for the Northern Antiques Fair hosted in Harrogate. The stands present paintings, sculpture, antique furniture, antiquities and more. Among the highlights are a rare 18th-century oak lambing chair (offered by Elaine Phillips Antiques) and a 5th/6th-century BC Greek pottery child's rattle in the shape of a pig (above), whose sound would soothe an infant and ward off evil spirits (offered by Odyssey, who are at the fair for the first time).
4–7 October
Harrogate Convention Centre
northernfair.com


LONDON
Asian Art in London

Leading international art dealers, auction houses, museums and institutions celebrate the riches of Asian art at this successful annual event that has been running for the past 21 years. This year the 10-day Asian Art in London (AAL) programme features exhibitions, auctions, lectures, symposia and workshops, sharing some of the finest Asian art from antiquity to the present day. The event also includes the 2018 AAL Gala Party (on Thursday 1 November, tickets must be booked in advance), where the results of the Emerging Artist Award will be announced, and late-night openings on Saturday 3 November in Kensington Church Street, Sunday 4 November in St James's, and Monday 5 November in Mayfair. After its successful launch at last year's AAL, The AAL Contemporary Satellite Event will be returning on 5–9 November. Works from China, Japan and South-East Asia will be on show at the Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, along with a non-selling exhibition from a private collection of South-East Asian art.
1–10 November
Multiple venues
www.asianartinlondon.com

Frieze Masters
Now in its seventh year, Frieze Masters (running alongside Frieze London and Frieze Sculpture) returns to Regent's Park with more than 130 galleries covering 6000 years of art history. This edition will see Old Master galleries and Asian specialists represented strongly. Antiquities (including spectacular ancient Chinese bronzes), tribal art and 20th-century art will also be on view. The talks programme curated by Tim Marlow presents all-female international artists, while the Spotlight section showcases the work of avant-garde revolutionary artists, such as the flamboyant Turkish artist and opera-singer Semiha Berksoy (1910–2004), whose striking work, Salome, 1962 (right) will be displayed by Vigo, London.
5–7 October
Regent's Park
frieze.com/fairs/frieze-masters


SOAS Specialist
Art Courses

These short art courses at the School of Oriental and African Studies consist of lectures by leading experts and curators as well as visits to museums. The autumn course, running from 5 to 8 November, Maritime Silk Route: Across the Seas of Asia, examines this trade network in surviving texts, early maps, paintings (right) and objects recovered from shipwrecks. Next year's courses include: The Art of the Book, 11 to 14 February; Collectors and Collecting of East Asia, 28 to 31 May; Arts of Eastern Christianity: Part II, 8 to 11 July.
For further details contact Denise Acford on 020 7898 4451 or email asianart@soas.ac.uk.
Various dates in 2018 and 2019
School of Oriental and African Studies
soas.ac.uk/art-short-courses

Martin Randall Travel Lecture Afternoon 2018 
Six of Martin Randall Travel's lecturers will be giving talks at this educational afternoon event, which includes refreshments and a canapé reception. The lectures are on a diverse range of subjects including: the place of Andean civilisation in human history; visiting country houses; late medieval pilgrimage; Parisian art and design in the interbellum period; Sarajevo; and Mozart and the piano in 1777.
27 October
Royal Society
www.martinrandall.com/london-lecture-afternoon

PAD London
Galleries focusing on art, design, decorative arts, tribal art and collectible jewellery, both vintage and contemporary, are gathering together for the 12th edition of this acclaimed fair for art and design. Antiquities will also be available, including an Attic amphora depicting an episode from the myth of Medea and a Roman, 2nd-century AD marble head of Ariadne (above), both exhibited by Phoenix Ancient Art. Among the 10 new international galleries taking part this year is VST, founded by archaeologist Veta Stefanidou Tsoukala in Athens
30 years ago, who will present art evocative of Classical Greek forms.
1–7 October
Berkeley Square
www.pad-fairs.com

Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire
This study day hosted by Ciceroni Travel examines the life and art of Thomas Cole one of the leading figures in American landscape painting (see pages 14 to 20). Born in Lancashire in 1801, Cole emigrated to America as a teenager and also travelled to Rome as a young man. His work extols the wild landscapes of the Hudson Valley and the Catskill Mountains, but warns of industrialisation and its consequences. The study day consists of two morning lectures and an afternoon visit to the National Gallery's exhibition Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire, where Cole's celebrated painting The Oxbow is on display in the UK for the first time.
12 September
The Linnean Society
www.ciceroni.co.uk

Tribal Art London
As the only tribal art fair of its kind in the UK, each year Tribal Art London brings together specialist dealers from across the globe. It features a rich and diverse mix of works, including books, textiles, sculptures, ceramics and jewellery from the regions of Oceania, Africa and Asia.
5–8 September
Mall Galleries
tribalartlondon.com

WEST DEAN
Byzantine Icon Painting

You can learn the techniques of Byzantine icon painting with Peter Murphy, an expert in traditional medieval painting practices, who has undertaken a number of commissions for UK churches. The course covers the basic principles of the design, water gilding, mixing and applying egg tempera, and dry brush modelling. There will also be an illustrated talk on the spiritual reasons for the styles used in icon painting (right).
7–12 October
West Dean College of Arts and Conservation
www.westdean.org.uk/study/short-courses/


TOURING
Jasmin Vardimon: Medusa

Jasmin Vardimon Company is celebrating its 20th anniversary with a tour of a new production Medusa, commissioned for the 20th anniversary of the opening of the (6th) Sadler's Wells Theatre (on the same site). A Sadler's Wells Associate Artist, Jasmin Vardimon (left) considers the powerful feminine symbol of Medusa, her snaky myth, the notion of reflection, and the sea, the home of jellyfish, which are known in Spanish as medusas.
Tour venues include:
Gulbenkian, Canterbury: 13–15 September
Northcott Theatre, Exeter: 3–5 October
Cambridge Junction, Cambridge: 10 October
Dance East, Ipswich: 18–20 October
Sadler's Wells, London: 22–24 October
For further information visit: jasminvardimon.com

HONG KONG
Fine Art Asia& Ink Asia
Fine Art Asia brings together a wide array of exhibitors from the region and beyond. Covering more than 5000 years of art works from ancient Chinese bronzes to contemporary photography, the fair includes 100 dealers offering high-quality silver, jewellery, antiquities, Impressionist and modern paintings, and more. For the third year, there will also be a special section focusing on photography; and this year Fine Art Asia is exhibiting alongside Ink Asia 2018, the world's first art fair devoted to art in ink, launched in 2015. Ink Asia celebrates contemporary works in and inspired by ink, which blend tradition and innovation.
29 September to 2 October
Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre
www.fineartasia.com/www.inkasia.com.hk

UNITED STATES


NEW YORK, New York
TEFAF New York Fall 2018

Collectors, museum curators, interior designers and connoisseurs from across the world all come together each year for TEFAF New York. With more than 90 exhibitors (including 10 new participants), the fair showcases a carefully considered selection of fine and decorative arts from the ancient world to the early 20th century. It sets out to provide an enhanced, immersive experience through varied programmes and institutional collaborations, as well as artfully curated booth presentations. Among the exhibitors presenting antiquities are: Galerie Cybele (taking part for the first time), Didier Aaron, Cahn International, Galerie Chenel, Rupert Wace Ancient Art and Charles Ede Ltd, who is offering a beautiful ancient Egyptian sarcophagus mask of a woman from Thebes, circa 943–716 BC (below) that was once in the collection of Augustus Pitt Rivers.
27–31 October
Park Avenue Armory
www.tefaf.com

 

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