Events


UNITED KINGDOM
COMPTON VERNEY, Warwickshire
Whistler and Nature
Oscar Wilde once commented that James McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) was the first artist to conjure up London fog on canvas. Whistler's atmospheric scenes capture the swirling mist in the city as well as out in the country. This exhibition showcases his paintings and other works, including his sketchbook, in order to explore the artist's relationship with the natural world – in London, the Netherlands and France, on the coast and in the field – and of nature constrained by warehouses, bridges, harbours and other industrial structures.
Compton Verney
+44 (0)1926 645 500
(www.comptonverney.org.uk)
Until 16 December 2018.

DUNDEE
Ocean Liners: Speed and Style

Japanese architect Kengo Kuma's first building in the UK, the brand new V&A Dundee on the Scottish city's waterfront, opened with an exhibition on the enduring appeal of the ocean liner. The museum has permanent galleries devoted to Scottish design, and its temporary exhibition gallery is the largest of its type in Scotland. For this inaugural show (previously exhibited at the V&A in London), more than 250 objects have been brought together to chart the impact of the ocean liner. Paintings, photographs and posters are displayed, alongside furnishings from these luxury vessels and clothing worn by their privileged passengers. Among the less glamorous models are those seen in Stanley Spencer's painting The Riveters (detail, above), from the 1941 series Shipbuilding on the Clyde, which was commissioned by the British Government in order to record wartime industries and to highlight the range of skills that created these leviathans.
V&A Dundee
+44 (0)1382 411611
(vam.ac.uk/dundee)
Until 24 February 2019.



LONDON
I object: Ian Hislop's search for dissent

In this exploration of how people have protested throughout history, this exhibition draws together material evidence from ancient Mesopotamia to the present day. Ian Hislop's selection of more than 100 objects voices various objections –political, social and religious. Reactions to the 2016 presidential election in the USA, the quest for women's suffrage, defiance against religious legislation, and even provocative anti-Cleopatra propaganda – in the form of a lewd Roman oil-lamp (above) – are some of the objects that illustrate the lively story of dissent.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 20 January 2019.



LONDON
Ribera: Art of Violence

The Spanish Baroque painter Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652) excelled in his depictions of martyrdom, and it is this violence that is the focus of the first UK exhibition dedicated to the artist. Ribera paid much attention to the depiction of the skin. Throughout his career, he painted many versions of the Apostle St Bartholomew, who was flayed alive, and in Apollo and Marsyas, 1627 (above), he shows the flaying of the satyr by the Greek god. These striking scenes are on show along with drawings and prints that further highlight his obsession with capturing the physicality of human suffering.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
Until 27 January 2019.

LONDON
Freud, Dalí and the Metamorphosis of Narcissus
Dalí tried several times to meet Sigmund Freud, whom he admired greatly, and when he finally did, in July 1938, he made the most of the occasion. Dalí brought along his recently completed painting, The Metamorphosis of Narcissus, with the intention of provoking a discussion on the psychoanalytical theory of narcissism while at the same time sketching Freud. To mark the 80th anniversary of this encounter, the famous painting and the sketches are both on show in an exhibition that investigates Freud's influence on Surrealism, as well as the analyst's views on painting.
Freud Museum
+44 (0)20 7435 2002
(www.freud.org.uk)
Until 24 February 2019.



LONDON

Mantegna & Bellini
The lives and works of two great masters of the Italian Renaissance – Andrea Mantegna (1401–1536) in Mantua and Giovanni Bellini (circa 1430–1516) in Venice – are intertwined, as this exhibition shows. Mantegna married Bellini's half-sister Nicolosia, but the connections between the two artists extended beyond wedding vows. Both were greatly influenced by sculpture, and both dealt with similar themes, yet showed quite distinct approaches when portraying them. With major loans, the works on show include depictions of Pietà, landscapes, and devotional paintings and portraits. Of particular note are versions of scenes from antiquity by both artists, including Bellini's An Episode from the Life of Publius Cornelius Scipio, circa 1506 (above), a highlight of
his sculptural monochrome work.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 27 January 2019.



LONDON

Landseer's The Monarch of the Glen
An iconic image forever associated with Scotland, The Monarch of the Glen, 1851 (above), by Edwin Landseer (1802–73) was originally commissioned for the Houses of Parliament. Now, it goes on display at the National Gallery for the first time since 1851, in a show that examines Landseer's links with the institution, including his designs for the famous lions in Trafalgar Square sitting just outside the gallery, and also with Queen Victoria, to whom he taught etching.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 28 November 2018 to 3 February 2019.



LONDON

Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs
The royal families of Russia and Britain are inextricably linked, and a rich array of objects in the Royal Collection explores the long history of relations between the two countries, stretching from Peter the Great's visit to London in 1698 to the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II – a cousin of George V, to whom he bore a close physical resemblance.
A century on from the Russian Revolution and the execution of the Romanovs, this poignant exhibition brings together both diplomatic gifts and personal family mementoes, highlighting the close bond between the two dynasties. Exquisite treasures by Fabergé, photographs, archival documents, paintings and portraits – such as Sir Godfrey Kneller's 1698 portrayal of Peter I, Tsar of Russia, and Laurits Regner Tuxen's The Family of Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia, 1896 (above) – all unite to tell the story of these momentous historic events and family meetings.
Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 9 November 2018 to
28 April 2019.



LONDON

The Sun: Living With Our Star
Adding rays of light and heat to the winter days, the Science Museum is exploring our vital relationship with the sun, which is essential to the existence of life on this planet. Archaeological artefacts provide an insight into ancient beliefs about this bright celestial body and show how people used mirrors to harness its powers to light fires. Scientific tools made over centuries will be on display, including an astronomical spectroscope used to identify helium 150 years ago, and the original orrery (a device made for and named after Charles Earl, 4th Earl of Orrery in 1712) which demonstrates how the earth and moon move around the sun. Observational images, like James Nasmyth's sunspot paintings and Elizabeth Beckley's astronomical photographs, capture the beauty of the sun, while the findings of research into powerful magnetic solar storms reveals its dark side. The exhibition also looks at upcoming solar missions.
Science Museum
+44 (0)333 241 4000
(www.sciencemuseum.org.uk)
Until 6 May 2019.

LONDON
Edward Burne-Jones: Pre-Raphaelite Visionary
Casting aside the industrial mindset of Victorian Britain, the Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones (1833–98) conjured up enchanted worlds in his work. This exhibition charts his output in both fine art and decorative art, covering his early career as a church decorator, his relationship with William Morris, and his large-scale narrative cycles. Works on show include paintings, stained glass, illustrated books and tapestries, which all reflect how, in his constant quest for beauty, Burne-Jones turned to the Bible, Arthurian legend and Classical mythology for inspiration.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 24 October 2018 to
24 February 2019.

LONDON
London in its Original Splendour
The latest contemporary art show above Roman London's temple of Mithras sees Argentinian artist Pablo Bronstein cover the gallery space in 3D-rendered wallpaper that draws inspiration from the history of the site. Whether drawing, choreography or performance, Bronstein's work focuses on imagined architecture, and this installation (above) presents a fantasy view of the architecture of London based on archaeological artefacts from the Mithraeum and the nearby designs by Christopher Wren, John Soane, Edwin Lutyens, and James Stirling.
London Mithraeum Bloomberg SPACE
+44 (0)20 7330 7500
(www.londonmithraeum.com/bloomberg-space)
Until 12 January 2019.

LONDON
Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cezanne

A mile down the road from the National Gallery, the Courtauld Gallery is closing this September for a major redevelopment. But works from their collection will be on show in an exhibition at the National Gallery uniting purchases made by the Gallery through the Samuel Courtauld Fund with the Impressionist acquisitions of
Samuel Courtauld (1876–1947). The exhibition examines how the industrialist built up his collection, from the first Impressionist exhibition to the death of his wife Elizabeth in 1931, when he stopped buying paintings; and how he influenced the formation of the national collections and the acceptance in Britain of modern art. Highlights include: Manet's A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, Toulouse-Lautrec's Jane Avril in the Entrance to the Moulin Rouge, and Cézanne's Still Life with Plaster Cupid, circa 1894 (above).
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 17 September 2018 to
20 January 2019.


LONDON
Oceania
The Royal Academy of Arts was founded 250 years ago, in 1768, the year of Captain James Cook's first Pacific expedition on the Endeavour. Marking these two anniversaries, the RA is staging the UK's first major survey of Oceanic art, with some 200 works spanning over 500 years and nearly a third of the world's surface, from New Guinea to Easter Island, Hawaii to New Zealand. With an eye on the history of the region and present-day issues, the exhibition celebrates the rich and diverse cultures of Oceania and explores three key themes: voyaging and water, place-making and settlement, and encounter, trade and exchange. Highlights include extraordinary works such as cloaks made of feathers, carved canoe paddles, ceremonial bowls and wooden carvings, including the Ta Moko panel, 1896-99 (above) by Tene Waitere, one of the most important Maori sculptors.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8027
(royalacademy.org.uk)
From 29 September to
10 December 2018.



LONDON
Fashioned from Nature

Exploring the relationship between fashion and nature since 1600, including camouflage, such as the 1998 design for a suit by Richard James (above), this exhibition shows work by Stella McCartney, Christopher Raeburn and Vivienne Westwood. It also highlights the challenges of sustainability in the fashion industry and showcases some of the research and cutting-edge processes involved.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 27 January 2019.

LONDON
Sir Richard Wallace: The Collector
On the bicentenary of his birth, the Wallace Collection takes a close look at its philanthropic founder and prolific collector, Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess of Hertford, who was brought up by his grandmother in Paris. His intriguing personal life and his impressive legacy are all explored in works collected by Sir Richard and displayed in the museum's new exhibition space.
Wallace Collection
+44 (0)207 563 9500
(wallacecollection.org)
Until 6 January 2019.



NEWCASTLE
Exposed: The Naked Portrait

Visitors to this exhibition are invited to consider naked portraits of some famous faces from the worlds of music, philosophy, literature, film and sport. Included in the show are photographs, prints, paintings, drawings and films (from the National Portrait Gallery's Collection) which explore the notions of nudity, vulnerability and self-assurance. Among the artists depicted are the animal and battle painter Abraham Cooper, seen drawing in a life class (above), by Charles West Cope (1811–90); Cecil Beaton (1904-80), Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-89), Lucien Freud, David Hockney, David Bailey, Gilbert & George and Tracey Emin.
Laing Art Gallery
+44 (0)191 278 1611
(laingartgallery.org.uk)
Until 3 March 2019.

NOTTINGHAM
Beyond Camden Town: The Late Works of Harold Gilman

Between 1918 and 1920, Spanish flu spread through the world killing millions of people. Among its many victims was the gifted Camden Town Group painter Harold Gilman (1876–1919). Staged to mark the centenary of his death at the height of his career, this exhibition focuses on Gilman's late paintings, where his distinctive use of colour and broken brushwork set him apart from his contemporaries in the Camden Town circle. His mature works show how his increasing engagement with French Post-Impressionism, in particular, with Edouard Vuillard and Vincent van Gogh. At this time, he was drawn repeatedly to specific subjects, such as female figures in interiors, through which he attempted to capture the essence of the characters of those who lived in London during the First World War, such as the two young women in Tea in the Bed-sitter, 1916 (above)
Djanogly Gallery, Lakeside Arts
+44 (0)115 846 7777
(lakesidearts.org.uk)
From 17 November 2018 to
10 February 2019.


OXFORD
Spellbound: Magic, Ritual & Witchcraft

Visitors entering this exhibition can choose whether or not they will walk under a ladder. They will then face questions about the role of 'magic' in their daily lives. The use of talismans reveals a fascinating range of artefacts reflecting magical practices from the 12th century to the present day. Among them is an intricate brass prognosticator, circa AD 1500 (above), which was used to calculate propitious times for blood-letting, according to the position of the moon. Crystal balls, and books of spells are displayed alongside poignant accounts of witch trials and prosecutions, including that of Helen Duncan in 1944, who was imprisoned for nine months under the Witchcraft Act of 1735 (which was not repealed until 1951). There are also gruesome objects on show, such as a pierced bull's heart, just one of thousands kept in houses for protection.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

OXFORD
From Sappho to Suffrage: Women Who Dared
An important anniversary being celebrated this year is the centenary of the Representation of the People Act of 1918, which gave the vote to British women over the age of 30, with a property qualification. Marking 100 years
of women's suffrage, the Bodleian is highlighting the remarkable achievements of women who defied expectations, from pirates and explorers to suffragettes, and going as far back as the poet Sappho.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
From 6 March 2018 to
3 February 2019.



SALFORD
Lowry & The Pre-Raphaelites

LS Lowry (1887–1976) was a fan of the Pre-Raphaelite artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–82), whose work, he said, he wanted to 'look at last thing at night and first thing each morning'. To chart this admiration of one artist by another, more than 40 works by Rossetti and other Pre-Raphaelites, including Ford Madox Brown and Edward Burne-Jones, have been brought together. Among them are Rossetti's The Bower Meadow, 1872 (above) and his 1866 chalk on paper Portrait of Alexa Wilding, which Lowry bought in 1962. It hung on his bedroom wall for the last 14 years of his life.
The Lowry
+44 (0)843 208 6005
(thelowry.com)
From 10 November 2018 to
24 February 2019.

SALISBURY
Hoards: A Hidden History of Ancient Britain

Across Britain, many caches of extraordinary ancient treasure have been unearthed. The discoveries, which often makes the headlines, are frequently made not by archaeologists but by members of the public. For instance, one boy digging in his back garden in Muswell Hill, London in 1928 uncovered a Roman ceramic money-box containing silver coins and a spoon. Hoards such as these can consist of valued personal possessions such as coins, hidden away for safekeeping during turbulent times, or other high-status goods, like weapons or amulets, deliberately deposited in spots of special significance, such as rivers, perhaps for ritual purposes. Organised with the British Museum, the exhibition features Bronze Age, Iron Age, and Roman hoards, and will go on tour to the Ulster Museum, Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, Brading Roman Villa on the Isle of Wight and the Ferens Art Gallery, Hull.
The Salisbury Museum
+44 (0)1722 332151
(www.salisburymuseum.org.uk)
Until 5 January 2019.

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Collecting Stories: Native American Art

Although Native American art formed part of the MFA's founding collections, the Navajo weavings, and items such as Plains Indians' beadwork and Zuni Pueblo pottery, like this Olla, or water-jar, 1820–40 (above), that entered the museum in its early days, are rarely seen. Now they have been put under the spotlight in this examination of the history of Native American art in the museum's holdings and displays.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 10 March 2019.


LOS ANGELES, California
Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings

Sally Mann's intimate and experimental photographs of people, places and things reflect the deep connection between the familiar and the landscape, and consider themes such as memory, desire, death and the indifference
of nature. Spanning more than 40 years, 67-year-old Mann's 110 photographic subjects include Civil War battlefields, 19th-century African-American churches and the vulnerable human body, as in Hephaestus, 2008 (above). They highlight the importance of the American South in her work and raise questions about identity, race, history and religion.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu/museum/)
From 16 November 2018 to
10 February 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh

When Howard Carter found 'wonderful things' inside the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, the world was captivated. Now, a large number of these 'wonderful things' are on a world tour, starting in Los Angeles. Sculptures, a gilded wooden bed, jewellery, and more are used to trace Tutankhamun's story –from his death and journey through the underworld to immortality in this world and the next.
California Science Center
+1 323-724-3623 (www.californiasciencecenter.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota
Horse Nation of the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ

Horses have played an important role in societies across the world, and they continue to be revered by the Dakhóta, Nakhóta, and Lakhóta people – known as the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Seven Council Fires) – who regard them as relatives and an essential part of the community, as well as their allies in battle or in hunting. Paintings, textiles, film and beadwork by leading contemporary Native American artists, such as Preston Neal's Horse with Yankton Sioux Mask, 2016 (above), show how this noble animal can influence history, spirituality and culture.
Minneapolis Institute of Art
+1 888 642 2787
(new.artsmia.org)
Until 3 February 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture, 1963–2017

The American artist Jack Whitten, who died earlier this year, is best known for his innovations in abstract painting. This exhibition, however, focuses on his work in sculpture, created in New York and Crete from carved wood and local found materials ranging from bone to fishing line. Responding to themes of place, memory, family and migration, Whitten's sculptures roughly fall into five categories – jugs, totems, guardians, reliquaries and swords – and draw inspiration from the arts of Africa, the ancient Mediterranean and the southern United States, examples of which are interspersed throughout the exhibition.
The Met Breuer
+1 212 731 1675
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 2 December 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Delacroix
For this comprehensive tour of the career of one of France's finest painters, more than 150 works by Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) are on show. Animal hunts, historical and mythological scenes, and later religious subjects and landscapes demonstrate a taste for striking subjects and a bright palette that led to admiration among his successors, such as Van Gogh who wrote that Delacroix 'is utterly beyond the paint'. Delacroix closely studied animals in a Parisian menagerie, and his interest in their physiognomy can be seen in much of his work. His trip to Algeria and Morocco with a diplomatic mission also had a great impact on him, and from this productive period, paintings such as the famous Women of Algiers in Their Apartment, 1834, and rarely seen portraits of local people are on display. Other highlights include Greece on the Ruins of Missolonghi, 1826, Medea About to Kill Her Children, 1838, and The Lion
Hunt, 1855.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Armenia!
In the 4th century, Armenia officially adopted Christianity, catalysing centuries of exquisite works for churches and private worship. Armenians developed a distinctive style, which can be seen in their gilded reliquaries, illuminated manuscripts, church models, khachkars (cross stones) and textiles, while comparative works reflect some aspects of Armenia's interactions with other cultural traditions. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 13 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice
Celebrations of the 500th anniversary of the birth of Jacopo Tintoretto (1518–94) are in full swing in his native Venice and in a number of institutions in the USA. While Tintoretto's paintings are rightly praised, the Morgan Library will place an overlooked aspect of his work under the spotlight. In the first exhibition of his drawings in more than 50 years, Tintoretto's individuality and his influence on other northern Italian artists, will be examined, as well as the different uses of drawing in the studio and teaching practices in the workshop.
The Morgan Library & Museum
+1 212 685 0008
(www.themorgan.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

This show will also be displayed at the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC (10 March to 26 May 2019), alongside Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice (10 March to 7 July 2019) and Venetian Prints in the Time of Tintoretto, (10 March to 26 May 2019). Other exhibitions celebrating the anniversary of the birth of this important Renaissance artist include: Tintoretto in Venice: Art, Faith and Medicine at the Scuola Grande di San Marco, Venice (until 6 January 2019); Venice during the Age of Tintoretto at Palazzo Mocenigo, Venice (until 6 January 2019); and Celebrating Tintoretto: Portrait Paintings and Studio Drawings, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (until 27 January 2019).

NEW YORK, New York
Nedjemankh and His Gilded Coffin
Nedjemankh was a high-ranking Egyptian priest of the ram-headed god Heryshef of Herakleopolis in upper Egypt. When he died in the 1st century BC he was buried in a spectacular, richly decorated, gilded coffin. Recently acquired by the Met, it is now the centrepiece of an exhibition that brings together other artefacts from the museum's extensive Egyptian collections, adding detail, setting his role as a priest, putting his burial and the ornamentation of his coffin in context. The show examines how the coffin's scenes and texts, in thick gesso relief, protect and guide Nedjemankh as he journeyed into the afterlife. The use of gold, which assists with rebirth in the next life, contrasts with the thin sheets of silver foil on the interior of the lid. This pairing is associated with the flesh and bones of the gods, the sun and the moon, and the eyes
of Heryshef.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 21 April 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
The Second Buddha: Master of Time

The legends of Padmasambhava, who is believed to have played a vital role in converting Tibet to Buddhism, see him overcome obstacles, liberate himself from life and death, and blur notions of time. Works from the 13th to the 20th century (and new interactive technology) tell the story of this key figure, hailed by Tibetans as 'The Second Buddha', with a focus on the links between past and future for establishing identity and projecting teachings forward for a more enlightened time.
Rubin Museum of Art
+1 212 620 5000
(www.rubinmuseum.org)
Until 7 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art
Although frightening, the deadly gorgon Medusa is often portrayed as beautiful and feminine rather than grotesque. This fascinating shift in visual representation first started in the 5th century BC, when other female mythical creatures, including sphinxes, sirens and Scylla, underwent a similar transformation. Art from the Classical world and beyond is used to explore the relationship between beauty and fear, and how the ancient femme fatale combined erotic desire, violence and death, and became a model for the late 19th-century reactions to women's empowerment.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
East Meets West: Jewels of the Maharajas from The Al Thani Collection

The wealth of precious stones and splendid jewelled objects in India has attracted envy for centuries. Glittering pieces from the collection of His Highness Sheikh Hamad bin Abdullah Al Thani, such as this pendant (above) from around 1575–1625, include works created for Mughal rulers, and more modern objects that reflect the continued influence of India on jewellers. As well as showing styles that responded to Persian, Islamic and European traditions, the exhibits demonstrate the properties of the prestigious materials, such as jade, which was considered to have curative powers and was carved into cups and drinking bowls.
Legion of Honor
+1 415 750 3600
(legionofhonor.org)
From 3 November 2018 to
24 February.

WASHINGTON DC
Japan Modern: Prints in the Age
of Photography
Beautiful woodblock prints have a long history, but how did this distinctive Japanese tradition fare after the arrival of photography in the country in the mid-19th century? Running alongside Japan Modern: Photography from the Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck Collection at the same venue, this exhibition charts how printmakers adapted their craft in response to this artistic upheaval and others – including a new system of government, and to earthquake and war, and how, after an initial decline in the medium, they used new approaches to capture scenes from their changing country.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(www.freersackler.si.edu)
Until 21 January 2019.

WASHINGTON DC
Corot: Women
Between the 1840s and early 1870s, the French artist Camille Corot (1796–1875) painted a number of figural works with his distinctive, delicate touch and careful choice of colour. The largest components of these paintings are his depictions of a single figure dressed in all kinds of costumes – rustic Italian, rich and exotic, or ancient clothing. Despite their numbers, Corot's images of women, imbued with a mysterious sense of their private inner lives, were rarely exhibited in his lifetime, but are now in the limelight in this exhibition. As well as these costumed models, Corot also painted nudes and later on in his career came a series of allegories using the female model in the studio to fulfil various well established poetic roles and activities, such as reading or playing the mandolin, or weaving crowns of flowers. Highlights include Corot's Classically-inspired painting Bacchante with a Panther (above), which he began in 1860 and reworked several years later.
National Gallery of Art
+1 202 737 4215
(www.nga.gov)
Until 31 December 2018.

AUSTRALIA


CANBERRA
Love & Desire: Pre-Raphaelite Masterpieces from the Tate

Full of vibrant colour with rich layers of detail and symbolism, the works of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood shirked the norms of the art establishment of the time by evoking the early Renaissance. For their subject matter, these rebellious young British artists looked not to contemporary society, but to written works and other sources, and had a penchant for the great love stories of history and literature. Major loans from the Tate's leading Pre-Raphaelite collection form the bulk this survey of the 19th-century art movement, which offers a rare chance to see these famous works in Australia. Highlights of the exhibition include John Everett Millais' Ophelia, 1852, and John William Waterhouse's The Lady of Shallot, 1888 (above).
National Gallery of Australia
+61 2 6240 6411
(nga.gov.au)
From 14 December 2018 to
28 April 2019.

CANADA


MONTREAL
Resplendent Illuminations: Books of Hours from the 13th to the 16th century in Quebec collections

Often given as wedding-gifts and used as primers for learning to read, Books of Hours were the most popular prayer-books among the laity. Their long-lived, widespread appeal across Europe between the 13th and 16th centuries gave rise to a range of textual, iconographical variations according to different regional traditions. Exploring the diversity among these private devotional works, this show, from seven Quebec collections, presents largely illuminated manuscripts, such as the leaf from a Book of Hours showing Saint Sebald of Nuremberg, circa 1515–25 (above) by Simon Bening (1483–1561), with a few early printed works as well. The role of women as patrons, commissioners of vernacular translations and illuminators is also explored.
Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
+1 514 285 2000
(mbam.qc.ca)
Until 6 January 2019.

DENMARK


COPENHAGEN
Odilon Redon: Into the Dream

Over 150 works, including, Pegasus and the Hydra, circa 1907 (above) by French symbolist, graphic artist, and painter Odilon Redon (1840–1916) have been brought together for an immersive journey through his dreamlike and narrative-filled world. His art conveys his interest in both science and progress, and the inexplicable world of darkness, dreams and myths. Organised in collaboration with the Kröller-Müller Museum in Holland, the exhibition includes loans of works by Redon from a range of public and private collections in Europe and the USA. These are set alongside pieces that highlight his influences, such as painting by Pierre Bonnard and Van Gogh, and artefacts from ancient Egypt and ancient Greece. The music and literature that inspired Redon can be heard from 'soundposts' throughout the gallery.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.dk)
From 12 October 2018 to
20 January 2019.

FRANCE
LENS
Love

Love has been a plentiful source of inspiration for countless artists and writers since the first pens and paint brushes were ever employed. Through artworks from a number of cultures over time, this nuanced exhibition traces the history of what we see as love and romance, from ancient statuary to paintings by Fragonard and Delacroix, to free love and libertine behaviour. There has always been an intriguing concern with the powerful dangers of feminine seduction, whether by Pandora in ancient Greece or by Eve in the Garden of Eden. In contrast, divine female icons, such as the Virgin Mary, are worshipped. Romanticism and the rituals of courtship and marriage, the pleasures of the flesh and the equality of partners are all addressed through an array of art.
Louvre Lens
+33 3 21 18 62 62
(www.louvrelens.fr)
From 26 September 2018 to
21 January 2019.


PARIS
Chiaroscuro Engraving: Cranach, Raphael, Rubens

Between the early 1500s and 1650, some of Europe's leading artists produced coloured wood engravings, known as chiaroscuro. Rubens, Parmigianino, Beccafumi, Hans Baldung Grien and a number of anonymous artists used chiaroscuro engravings to imitate other media, mainly drawings – such as the anonymous Head of Dryad (above). It became a medium in its own right that opened up new opportunities to experiment with light and shade in monochrome.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 14 January 2019.

PARIS
Archaeology goes Graphic

The latest offering in the Petite Galerie, the Louvre's space devoted to art and cultural education for all, examines the relationship between archaeology and the art of the comic book, known in France as 'the 9th art'. With archaeological discoveries, such as a terracotta nude from 2340–1500 BC (above), and comics and drawings, visitors can learn about the work of the archaeologist from the 19th century onwards. Sketchbooks have their place in archaeology as in graphic art, but as well as this tool, the two subjects have more in common. While archaeologists are not the most frequent characters in comics, they do occasionally appear along with excavations and their spectacular discoveries, in imaginative illustrated stories that combine fact and fiction, mythical figures, places and objects.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 26 September 2018
to 1 July 2019.

PARIS
Neanderthal
Neanderthals have received some bad press since the first discovery of a skull in Germany's Neander valley in 1856, but recent research is continuing to transform our ideasabout this species. With Neanderthal remains on show, such as this 60,000-year-old skull (above) from La Chapelle-aux-Saints, this exhibition explores changing public perception, depictions in the arts and latest scientific investigations.
Musée de l'Homme
+33 1 44 05 72 72
(www.museedelhomme.fr)
Until 7 January 2019.

 

QATAR


DOHA
Syria Matters

To celebrate its 10th anniversary, Doha's Museum of Islamic Art is drawing on its rich collection of material from Syria to present a comprehensive survey of the country's remarkable cultural heritage. Supplemented by loans from international institutions, the exhibition looks at extraordinary but devastated ancient cities, such as Palmyra and Aleppo, and features installations that immerse visitors in key sites such as the Umayyad mosque of Damascus and the citadel of Aleppo. Highlights include: a wooden interior of a private house in Damascus; a 9th-century BC basalt bird of prey from Tell Halaf; a 3rd-century AD relief from Palmyra showing a camel; and the 'Cavour Vase' (below right)– a sumptuous eample of an enamelled and gilded glass vessel made in Syria, or Egyp,t in the late 13th century AD.
Museum of Islamic Art
+974 4422 4444
(www.mia.org.qa)
From 23 November to
13 February 2019.

SPAIN


BILBAO
Van Gogh to Picasso: The Thannhauser Legacy

Following in his father Heinrich's footsteps, Justin Thannhauser was also a prominent art dealer who promoted the spread of modern art in 20th-century Europe. Since 1965, the Guggenheim in New York has housed the Thannhauser Collection, but now a significant portion of it is travelling from one Guggenheim museum to another. Works by Cézanne, Degas, Manet, Picasso and Van Gogh – including his Mountains at Saint-Rémy, 1889 (below) – are on display at the Guggenheim in Bilbao, showing how these and other artists developed innovative practices to capture the social and environmental changes at the start of the 20th century. As well as works on paper, paintings and sculpture, archival material, such as stock books, and photographs demonstrate the Thannhauser family's pivotal role in the dissemination of this art.
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 24 March 2019.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
EXETER
Classical Association Southwest Lectures

The Art of Faking it: The Letters of Marcus Brutus and Mithridates
Lecture by Kathryn Tempest (in association with the Roman Society).
12 December

Barefaced Greek
Film screening and Q&A with actor and producer Máirín O'Hagan.
17 January

Events take place at 5pm in the Lecture Theatre in Tower Building, Exeter College.
https://casouthwest.wordpress.com/events-2018-19/

LONDON
Ancient and Popular Reception of the Ancient Near East Seminar Series

Aby Warburg and the liver models: the impact of cuneiform studies on art history
Babette Schnitzlein
12 November

Identifying the races of the ancient Near East: how European scholars in the 19th and early 20th centuries used ancient Egyptian representations of humans for racial classification
Felix Wiedemann
26 November 2018

Displaying, hiding and replacing artefacts: on connecting the ancient and the modern Middle East in museums and public space
Mirjam Brusius
10 December

The seminars, organised by the London Centre for the Ancient Near East, are held at SOAS at 6.15pm and are followed by a wine reception.
http://banealcane.org/lcane

British Institute at Ankara London Lecture
Archaeologists and Treasure Hunters on the Tigris

Turkish archaeologist Gül Pulhan will outline how the regional archaeology museums in Batman, Mardin and Diyarbakır in south-east Turkey are working to protect the heritage of these historic areas through scientific excavations, exhibitions and educational programmes.
6 November, 6.30pm
British Academy, Carlton Terrace
biaa.ac.uk


Asian Art in London
Leading international dealers, auction houses and prominent museums and institutions celebrate the riches of Asian art at an annual event that has been running for the past 21 years. The 10-day Asian Art in London (AAL) programme features exhibitions, auctions, lectures, symposia and workshops. Some of the finest Asian art from antiquity to the present day will be on show, including An Imaginary Gathering: Shah 'Abbas I with the Mughal ambassador Khan 'Alam from Mughal India, an exquisite, early 18th-century opaque watercolour on paper, heightened with gold (above), exhibited by St James's dealers Forge & Lynch (www.forgelynch.com).
At the AAL Gala Party, which will be held on Thursday 1 November, the results of the Emerging Artist Award will be announced. There will be late openings of the galleries on Kensington Church Street on Saturday 3 November; in St James's, on Sunday 4 November; in Mayfair on Monday 5 November. After its successful launch last year, the AAL Contemporary Satellite Event will return between 5 and 9 November when works from China, Japan and souh-east Asia will be on show at the Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, alongside a non-selling exhibition of south-east Asian art.
1–10 November
Multiple venues
www.asianartinlondon.com

Return to Assyria: A Photographic Journey
Photographer, filmmaker and writer Richard Wilding will transport you to Iraqi Kurdistan and Northern Iraq in an illustrated talk, drawing on his contemporary images of the ethnic and religious communities and archaeology of the region, such as Assyrian relief at Maltai near Dohuk, 2017 (above). Early and mid-20th century photographs by Gertrude Bell and Anthony Kersting, plus accounts and drawings by the 19th-century archaeologist, Austen Henry Layard, and Jacobsen & Lloyd from the 1930s, also help to conjure up a sense of the region. The talk is a satellite event of Asian Art in London and part of the Asia House Arts and Learning Programme, held in partnership with GULAN (an organsiation that promotes Kurdish culture).
6 November, 6.45–8.30pm
Asia House
www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/return-to-assyria-a-photographic-journey-by-richard-wilding tickets-49038150428


OXFORD
Andante Study Days

Beyond Greece
Denise Allen
14 November and 24 January

Glories of Istanbul
Terry Richardson
13 December

Ashmolean Museum
www.andantetravels.co.uk

FRANCE
PARIS
Also Known As Africa

For this year's edition of AKAA, the art fair broadens its horizons beyond the continent of Africa and looks to other regions, particularly those of the Global South. The 2018 fair's cultural programme will explore Africa's spiritual, ideological and economic relationship with the Middle East, the Americas and Asia.
9–11 November
Carreau du Temple
akaafair.com

ITALY
FLORENCE
Rethinking Osiris

This international conference is dveoted to the study of the god Osiris throughout history, with a number of talks encompassing a range of disciplines. Drawing on archaeology, iconography, literature and more, there is much to learn about this ancient deity and his place both in and outside Egypt and in more modern times. Mark Smith of the University of Oxford will deliver the keynote lecture, Following Osiris: New Perspectives for the Twenty-First Century.
26–27 March 2019
Ex-Church of S Jacopo
camnes.org/rethinking-osiris

 

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