Events


UNITED KINGDOM

DUNDEE
Ocean Liners: Speed and Style

Japanese architect Kengo Kuma's first building in the UK, the brand new V&A Dundee on the Scottish city's waterfront, opened with an exhibition on the enduring appeal of the ocean liner. The museum has permanent galleries devoted to Scottish design, and its temporary exhibition gallery is the largest of its type in Scotland. For this inaugural show (previously exhibited at the V&A in London), more than 250 objects have been brought together to chart the impact of the ocean liner. Paintings, photographs and posters are displayed, alongside furnishings from these luxury vessels and clothing worn by their privileged passengers. Among the less glamorous models are those seen in Stanley Spencer's painting The Riveters (detail, above), from the 1941 series Shipbuilding on the Clyde, which was commissioned by the British Government in order to record wartime industries and to highlight the range of skills that created these leviathans.
V&A Dundee
+44 (0)1382 411611
(vam.ac.uk/dundee)
Until 24 February 2019.


EDINBURGH
Charles II: Art & Power

With the Restoration in 1660 came a renewed interest in the arts in Britain after years of oppressive puritanical Cromwellian rule. Charles II and his court became great patrons of the arts, which not only helped to adorn the royal apartments, but also reinforced the king's position and glorified the monarchy. Portraits, including Peter Lely's Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, circa 1665, depicted as Minerva (above), Old Master paintings, tapestries, furniture and other objects embellished in silver gilt, reveal how the arts helped to re-establish the Stuart monarchy.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
Until 2 June 2019.

LONDON
Freud, Dalí and The Metamorphosis of Narcissus

It took Dalí several attempts to meet Freud, whom he admired greatly, and when he finally did meet him, in July 1938, he made the most of the occasion. Dalí brought along his recently completed painting The Metamorphosis of Narcissus with the intention of initiating a discussion on the psychoanalytical theory of narcissism and, while they talked, he sketched Freud. To mark the 80th anniversary of this encounter, the sketches and the painting are all on show in an exhibition that looks at Freud's influence on Surrealism, as well as his views on painting.
Freud Museum
+44 (0)20 7435 2002
(www.freud.org.uk)
Until 24 February 2019.

LONDON
Alfred Munnings: War Artist, 1918
During the First World War, Sir Alfred Munnings (1878–1959) was commissioned by the Canadian War Memorials Fund as an official war artist and, in 1918, he worked with the Canadian Expeditionary Force on the Western Front. There he painted some 40 works – pastoral landscapes, portraits and, most importantly, equine compositions. These have all been brought together to show his record of the conflict and his burgeoning talent, which led to admittance to the Royal Academy of Arts a year later, in 1919.
National Army Museum
+44 (0)20 7730 0717
(www.nam.ac.uk)
Until 3 March 2019.

LONDON
Lorenzo Lotto Portraits
In 1895 art historian Bernard Berenson wrote of the Italian Renaissance artist Lorenzo Lotto: 'He seems always to have been able to define his feelings, emotions and ideals, instead of being a mere highway for them, this makes him pre-eminently a psychologist… The portraits all have the interest of personal confessions.' The personal, emotional and psychological aspect of Lotto's work is explored in this exhibition, the first devoted to his remarkable portraits. As well as the richly coloured paintings of a range of middle-class sitters that span the entirety of his career, the exhibition includes objects (such as carpet, a dress, books, and pieces of Classical sculpture) relating to items included in the portraits to bring out the sitters' identities and back stories. For example, Portrait of Andrea Odoni, 1527 (above) shows the 16th-century antiquities collector clutching a statuette of Diana of Ephesus which is displayed nearby.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 10 February 2019.

LONDON
Elizabethan Treasures: Miniatures by Hilliard and Oliver
Miracles of fine detail on a tiny scale, miniature paintings were much admired by monarchs, courtiers and the middle classes during the 16th and 17th centuries. England was particularly renowned for this art form, with the two artists Exeter-born Nicholas Hilliard (1547–1619) and French-born Isaac Oliver (1565–1617) surpassing all others. Not just exquisite portraits, the size of miniatures makes them into intriguing objects that could be worn openly around the neck, or secretly concealed. This exhibition examines the portrait miniatures of Hilliard and Oliver that earned them international fame and offers us an insight into relationships, identity and visual culture in Elizabethan and Jacobean society. Portraits of leading figures of the day, such as Hilliard's exquisite Queen Elizabeth I, 1572 (above), James I, Sir Francis Drake and Sir Walter Raleigh are some of the famous names on show.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0)20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
From 21 February to 19 May 2019.

LONDON
Don McCullin
Ever since he started taking photographs in the 1950s, Sir Don McCullin has dramatically captured landscapes, still life, and scenes of conflict around the world on film. This major retrospective presents more than 250 photographs, all printed by McCullin in his own darkroom, ranging from his first images taken around Finsbury Park and his forays into photojournalism, to his more recent powerful work documenting the deliberate destruction of ancient Syrian sites, such as The theatre of the Roman city of Palmyra, partly destroyed by Islamic State fighters, 2017 (above). Some tools of the trade are also on display, including a helmet and a Nikon camera which was hit by a bullet in Cambodia; these highlight the great risk often involved in this important work.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 5 February to 6 May 2019.

LONDON
Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory
Working in the early 20th century, the French painter Pierre Bonnard (1867–1947) often created his colourful compositions from memory, imbuing them with a sense of fleeting melancholy, or of a moment lost in time. This show considers not only Bonnard's intimate domestic scenes, featuring his wife, and his unconventional landscapes dense with foliage, but also more overlooked aspects of his oeuvre, involving his regular trips around France, his way of working on different subjects side by side, and his reaction to the two world wars. Highlights include Studio with Mimosa, 1939–46 (above), which reflects his move towards abstraction later in his life.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 23 January to 6 May 2019.

LONDON
Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams
The House of Dior has created magnificent gowns for members of the Royal Family and for celebrities since 1947. This exhibition looks at the work of French designer Christian Dior and the House's six subsequent artistic directors (Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons, and Maria Grazia Chiuri) through rare Haute Couture garments, photography, film and vintage perfume (including Miss Dior, launched in 1947 alongside the very first show). The exhibits reflect the importance of flowers in Dior's designs, as well as other sources of inspiration, including global travel and 18th-century decorative arts. Of particular interest is the section charting Dior's relationship with British manufacturers, such as Dents the glovemakers, established in 1777, and Lyle & Scott, the Scottish knitwear firm set up in 1874; and for notable clients, such as Nancy Mitford, Margot Fonteyn and Princess Margaret, who wore a dress designed by Dior for her official 21st birthday portrait (above) taken by Cecil Beaton (1904–80).
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 2 February to 14 July 2019.

LONDON
Freud, Dalí and the Metamorphosis of Narcissus
Dalí tried several times to meet Sigmund Freud, whom he admired greatly, and when he finally did, in July 1938, he made the most of the occasion. Dalí brought along his recently completed painting, The Metamorphosis of Narcissus, with the intention of provoking a discussion on the psychoanalytical theory of narcissism while at the same time sketching Freud. To mark the 80th anniversary of this encounter, the famous painting and the sketches are both on show in an exhibition that investigates Freud's influence on Surrealism, as well as the analyst's views on painting.
Freud Museum
+44 (0)20 7435 2002
(www.freud.org.uk)
Until 24 February 2019.



LONDON

Landseer's The Monarch of the Glen
An iconic image forever associated with Scotland, The Monarch of the Glen, 1851 (above), by Edwin Landseer (1802–73) was originally commissioned for the Houses of Parliament. Now, it goes on display at the National Gallery for the first time since 1851, in a show that examines Landseer's links with the institution, including his designs for the famous lions in Trafalgar Square sitting just outside the gallery, and also with Queen Victoria, to whom he taught etching.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 28 November 2018 to 3 February 2019.



LONDON

Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs
The royal families of Russia and Britain are inextricably linked, and a rich array of objects in the Royal Collection explores the long history of relations between the two countries, stretching from Peter the Great's visit to London in 1698 to the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II – a cousin of George V, to whom he bore a close physical resemblance.
A century on from the Russian Revolution and the execution of the Romanovs, this poignant exhibition brings together both diplomatic gifts and personal family mementoes, highlighting the close bond between the two dynasties. Exquisite treasures by Fabergé, photographs, archival documents, paintings and portraits – such as Sir Godfrey Kneller's 1698 portrayal of Peter I, Tsar of Russia, and Laurits Regner Tuxen's The Family of Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia, 1896 (above) – all unite to tell the story of these momentous historic events and family meetings.
Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 9 November 2018 to
28 April 2019.



LONDON

The Sun: Living With Our Star
Adding rays of light and heat to the winter days, the Science Museum is exploring our vital relationship with the sun, which is essential to the existence of life on this planet. Archaeological artefacts provide an insight into ancient beliefs about this bright celestial body and show how people used mirrors to harness its powers to light fires. Scientific tools made over centuries will be on display, including an astronomical spectroscope used to identify helium 150 years ago, and the original orrery (a device made for and named after Charles Earl, 4th Earl of Orrery in 1712) which demonstrates how the earth and moon move around the sun. Observational images, like James Nasmyth's sunspot paintings and Elizabeth Beckley's astronomical photographs, capture the beauty of the sun, while the findings of research into powerful magnetic solar storms reveals its dark side. The exhibition also looks at upcoming solar missions.
Science Museum
+44 (0)333 241 4000
(www.sciencemuseum.org.uk)
Until 6 May 2019.

LONDON
Edward Burne-Jones: Pre-Raphaelite Visionary
Casting aside the industrial mindset of Victorian Britain, the Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones (1833–98) conjured up enchanted worlds in his work. This exhibition charts his output in both fine art and decorative art, covering his early career as a church decorator, his relationship with William Morris, and his large-scale narrative cycles. Works on show include paintings, stained glass, illustrated books and tapestries, which all reflect how, in his constant quest for beauty, Burne-Jones turned to the Bible, Arthurian legend and Classical mythology for inspiration.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 24 October 2018 to
24 February 2019.


NEWCASTLE
Exposed: The Naked Portrait

Visitors to this exhibition are invited to consider naked portraits of some famous faces from the worlds of music, philosophy, literature, film and sport. Included in the show are photographs, prints, paintings, drawings and films (from the National Portrait Gallery's Collection) which explore the notions of nudity, vulnerability and self-assurance. Among the artists depicted are the animal and battle painter Abraham Cooper, seen drawing in a life class (above), by Charles West Cope (1811–90); Cecil Beaton (1904-80), Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-89), Lucien Freud, David Hockney, David Bailey, Gilbert & George and Tracey Emin.
Laing Art Gallery
+44 (0)191 278 1611
(laingartgallery.org.uk)
Until 3 March 2019.

NORWICH
Ken Kiff: The Sequence

Ken Kiff started his vast series The Sequence in 1971 and worked on it intermittently until his death in 2001. The result is a set of almost 200 acrylic paintings on paper, 60 of which will be hung together in the largest-ever display of works from The Sequence. They track Kiff's development in interconnected themes and a blend of abstract and figurative imagery, and pinpoint the place of the series in his oeuvre. The artist's compositions draw on everyday life, his personal experience of analysis – as seen in Talking with a psychoanalyst: night sky, circa 1975–80 (below) – and myths, as well as folktales from a range of cultures.
Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
+44 (0)1603 593199
(www.scva.ac.uk)
Until 23 April 2019.

NOTTINGHAM
Beyond Camden Town: The Late Works of Harold Gilman

Between 1918 and 1920, Spanish flu spread through the world killing millions of people. Among its many victims was the gifted Camden Town Group painter Harold Gilman (1876–1919). Staged to mark the centenary of his death at the height of his career, this exhibition focuses on Gilman's late paintings, where his distinctive use of colour and broken brushwork set him apart from his contemporaries in the Camden Town circle. His mature works show how his increasing engagement with French Post-Impressionism, in particular, with Edouard Vuillard and Vincent van Gogh. At this time, he was drawn repeatedly to specific subjects, such as female figures in interiors, through which he attempted to capture the essence of the characters of those who lived in London during the First World War, such as the two young women in Tea in the Bed-sitter, 1916 (above)
Djanogly Gallery, Lakeside Arts
+44 (0)115 846 7777
(lakesidearts.org.uk)
From 17 November 2018 to
10 February 2019.

OXFORD
From Sappho to Suffrage: Women Who Dared
An important anniversary being celebrated this year is the centenary of the Representation of the People Act of 1918, which gave the vote to British women over the age of 30, with a property qualification. Marking 100 years
of women's suffrage, the Bodleian is highlighting the remarkable achievements of women who defied expectations, from pirates and explorers to suffragettes, and going as far back as the poet Sappho.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
From 6 March 2018 to
3 February 2019.



SALFORD
Lowry & The Pre-Raphaelites

LS Lowry (1887–1976) was a fan of the Pre-Raphaelite artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–82), whose work, he said, he wanted to 'look at last thing at night and first thing each morning'. To chart this admiration of one artist by another, more than 40 works by Rossetti and other Pre-Raphaelites, including Ford Madox Brown and Edward Burne-Jones, have been brought together. Among them are Rossetti's The Bower Meadow, 1872 (above) and his 1866 chalk on paper Portrait of Alexa Wilding, which Lowry bought in 1962. It hung on his bedroom wall for the last 14 years of his life.
The Lowry
+44 (0)843 208 6005
(thelowry.com)
From 10 November 2018 to
24 February 2019.

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
The Art of Influence: Propaganda Postcards from the Era of World Wars

The tumultuous years of the first half of the 20th-century engendered many striking propaganda images across
the world. Postcards, with a simple, memorable message, clear graphics and bold colours, were the perfect medium for spreading propaganda as this exhibition shows through some 150 examples from the Leonard A Lauder Postcard Archive, a promised gift to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Whether created in Europe, the Soviet Union, the USA or Japan, by government bureaux, aid organisations or resistance movements, the postcards all share the same themes and use similar visual language, regardless of politics. Heroic soldiers, the everyman (and less frequently everywoman), maps, the 'V' (as in 'V for Victory') and the new dawn for the oppressed masses – such as in Viva il Comunismo! 1919–20 (left), by Guiseppe Scalarini (1873–1948) – were all popular.
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 21 January 2019.


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Collecting Stories: Native American Art

Although Native American art formed part of the MFA's founding collections, the Navajo weavings, and items such as Plains Indians' beadwork and Zuni Pueblo pottery, like this Olla, or water-jar, 1820–40 (above), that entered the museum in its early days, are rarely seen. Now they have been put under the spotlight in this examination of the history of Native American art in the museum's holdings and displays.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 10 March 2019.

CHICAGO, Illinois
Painting the Floating World: Ukiyo-e Masterpieces from

the Weston Collection In 17th- and 18th-century Kyoto, Osaka and Edo (now Tokyo), people of all ranks headed to city districts, where there were kabuki theatres, brothels and seasonal festivities, in search of entertainment. This realm of pleasure-seeking became known as ukiyo or the floating world, and was captured in one-off paintings by leading artists, such as Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) and Kitagawa Utamaro (1753–1806), both renowned for their woodblock prints. The Weston Collection, amassed by Robert Weston over the past 25 years, focuses on bijinga, or 'pictures of beauties', that represent the ideals of style and sophistication that reigned in the floating world, as in Woman Writng a Poem on a Fan, 1789–1801 (below), by Chobunsai Eishi (1756–1829).
Art Institute of Chicago
+1 312 443 3600
(www.artic.edu)
Until 27 January 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
The Renaissance Nude

The use of live models and Classical sculpture were equally important in the training of Renaissance artists, which ultimately led to the prominence of the nude in the art of 15th- and 16th-century Europe. Both female and male nudes were painted, and in 15th-century Italy it was the male nude that was pre-eminent appearing, for example, in images of St Sebastian. Whether Christian figures, such as Jean Fouquet's Virgin and Child, circa 1452–55 (above right) or pagan Classical subjects, such as the goddess Venus, celebrations of ideal beauty and explorations of the human form as it advances from youth into old age, the naked body appears in a wide range of media – prints, paintings, sculpture, drawings, and illuminated manuscripts – produced in Rome, Florence, Venice and Nuremberg, and lesser-known centres in northern Europe. Among the many great artists featured in this colourful exhibition are Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, Dürer, Lucas Cranach the Elder and Jan Gossart.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu/museum/)
Until 27 January 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
Underworld: Imagining the Afterlife
Specialists at the J Paul Getty Museum have recently conserved a spectacular red-figure vase from an elite grave
in Altamura in Apulia, southern Italy, showing more than 20 figures from Greek mythology including Persephone, Hades, Orpheus, Hermes, Herakles and Sisyphus, who is shown eternally pushing his boulder up a hill. The newly conserved 4th-century BC krater, which is on loan from the National Archaeological Museum in Naples, is now at the centre of an exhibition investigating Ancient Greek attitudes towards death and the afterlife. Dionysos – who is shown on an Apulian funerary vessel, circa 350–325 BC (below) – and Orpheus could offer an improved afterlife to those initiated into their Mystery cults, but little is known about these secretive rites. Illustrating the arcane and archaic connection between these figures and death are the gold Orphic tablets and the proliferation of Apulian funerary vessels on which the god Dionysos is depicted, either in relation to symposium scenes or in the Underworld.
Getty Villa
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu/villa/)
Until 18 March 2019.


LOS ANGELES, California
Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings

Sally Mann's intimate and experimental photographs of people, places and things reflect the deep connection between the familiar and the landscape, and consider themes such as memory, desire, death and the indifference
of nature. Spanning more than 40 years, 67-year-old Mann's 110 photographic subjects include Civil War battlefields, 19th-century African-American churches and the vulnerable human body, as in Hephaestus, 2008 (above). They highlight the importance of the American South in her work and raise questions about identity, race, history and religion.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu/museum/)
From 16 November 2018 to
10 February 2019.

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota
Horse Nation of the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ

Horses have played an important role in societies across the world, and they continue to be revered by the Dakhóta, Nakhóta, and Lakhóta people – known as the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Seven Council Fires) – who regard them as relatives and an essential part of the community, as well as their allies in battle or in hunting. Paintings, textiles, film and beadwork by leading contemporary Native American artists, such as Preston Neal's Horse with Yankton Sioux Mask, 2016 (above), show how this noble animal can influence history, spirituality and culture.
Minneapolis Institute of Art
+1 888 642 2787
(new.artsmia.org)
Until 3 February 2019.



NEW YORK, New York
Jewelry: The Body Transformed

Exploring jewellery as a universal and personal art form, this show brings together a stunning selection of pieces, dating from 2600 BC to the present. Head-dresses, belts, brooches, ear-rings, necklaces, bracelets, rings and other items of personal adornment have a transformative impact on the body that wears them. This aspect of transformation is brought out further by the photographs, prints, sculptures and paintings that accompany the jewellery. Highlights of the exhibits include: the regalia of the rulers of Calima (Colombia); ivories and bronzes from Benin; gold sandals and toe stalls, circa 1479–1425 BC (above) from the ancient Egyptian tomb of the three foreign wives of Thutmose III in Thebes; and finely crafted gold ear-rings, showing Ganymede and Zeus in the form of an eagle, from Hellenistic Greece.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 24 February 2019.


NEW YORK, New York
I n Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met

Since the early days of the Met, Dutch Golden Age paintings have been an important feature of the museum's collection. Stunning 17th-century paintings by the likes of Rembrandt, Hals and Vermeer were part of the Met's founding purchase in 1871, and the museum has since acquired many more. Some 67 works from the permanent collections are on show, demonstrating both the refined skill of the Dutch artists and illustrating the key concerns of the day, such as religion. Landscapes, portraits, still lifes, and comic scenes all appear, as do paintings of women observed in everyday domestic settings, a major theme in 17th-century Dutch art best exemplified by Vermeer. Rembrandt is central to the exhibition, and his influence on his students, and other artists, is explored. Rembrandt's Portrait of Gerard de Lairesse, 1665–67, is juxtaposed alongside Lairesse's Apollo and Aurora, 1671 (below), which evoke some of the tensions between realism and idealism at the time.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 4 October 2020.

NEW YORK, New York
Nedjemankh and His Gilded Coffin
Nedjemankh was a high-ranking Egyptian priest of the ram-headed god Heryshef of Herakleopolis in upper Egypt. When he died in the 1st century BC he was buried in a spectacular, richly decorated, gilded coffin. Recently acquired by the Met, it is now the centrepiece of an exhibition that brings together other artefacts from the museum's extensive Egyptian collections, adding detail, setting his role as a priest, putting his burial and the ornamentation of his coffin in context. The show examines how the coffin's scenes and texts, in thick gesso relief, protect and guide Nedjemankh as he journeyed into the afterlife. The use of gold, which assists with rebirth in the next life, contrasts with the thin sheets of silver foil on the interior of the lid. This pairing is associated with the flesh and bones of the gods, the sun and the moon, and the eyes
of Heryshef.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 21 April 2019.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
East Meets West: Jewels of the Maharajas from The Al Thani Collection

The wealth of precious stones and splendid jewelled objects in India has attracted envy for centuries. Glittering pieces from the collection of His Highness Sheikh Hamad bin Abdullah Al Thani, such as this pendant (above) from around 1575–1625, include works created for Mughal rulers, and more modern objects that reflect the continued influence of India on jewellers. As well as showing styles that responded to Persian, Islamic and European traditions, the exhibits demonstrate the properties of the prestigious materials, such as jade, which was considered to have curative powers and was carved into cups and drinking bowls.
Legion of Honor
+1 415 750 3600
(legionofhonor.org)
From 3 November 2018 to
24 February.

VERO BEACH, Florida
Michael Craig-Martin: Present Sense

In the second annual exhibition at the Windsor, part of a three-year curatorial partnership with London's Royal Academy of Arts, the work of Royal Academician Michael Craig-Martin is on show. It includes prints and sculpture as well as his characteristic brightly coloured paintings, including Untitled (lightbulb blue), 2017 (above) and four new ones, completed in 2018, reflecting the artist's interest in the everyday, and, increasingly, technological objects of our time, such as laptops, iPhones, and wireless headphones.
The Gallery at Windsor
+1 772 388 4071
(www.windsorflorida.com)
From 29 January to 25 April 2019.

AUSTRALIA


CANBERRA
Love & Desire: Pre-Raphaelite Masterpieces from the Tate

Full of vibrant colour with rich layers of detail and symbolism, the works of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood shirked the norms of the art establishment of the time by evoking the early Renaissance. For their subject matter, these rebellious young British artists looked not to contemporary society, but to written works and other sources, and had a penchant for the great love stories of history and literature. Major loans from the Tate's leading Pre-Raphaelite collection form the bulk this survey of the 19th-century art movement, which offers a rare chance to see these famous works in Australia. Highlights of the exhibition include John Everett Millais' Ophelia, 1852, and John William Waterhouse's The Lady of Shallot, 1888 (above).
National Gallery of Australia
+61 2 6240 6411
(nga.gov.au)
From 14 December 2018 to
28 April 2019.

AUSTRIA


VIENNA
Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures

Since 2012, the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna has invited various prominent cultural figures to work with museum curators to present a personal selection of objects and artworks, which will offer a new perspective on their impressive collections of more than 4 million objects. For the third instalment of these exhibitions, Texan cult film director Wes Anderson and the writer and illustrator Juman Malouf (below) have brought together more than 400 objects, which include artefacts from Ancient Egypt – such as the 4th-century BC shrew (spitzmaus) mummy (that lends its name to the exhibition) – and from Greece and Rome, Old Master paintings, coins, musical instruments, armour, natural history specimens and much more.
Kunsthistorisches Museum
+43 1 525240
(www.khm.at)
Until 28 April 2019.

BELGIUM


BRUGES
Mummies in Bruges: Secrets of Ancient Egypt

In this exhibition, human and animal mummies (some of which have been scanned) from the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden's collection are on show alongside statues, stelae, burial gifts, papyri from the Book of the Dead, magical amulets, scarabs and compelling painted golden mummy masks (above), all of which shed light on Ancient Egyptian ways of life, their rituals, their burial customs, and their beliefs about the afterlife.
Oud Sint-Jan Exhibition Centre
+32 50 47 61 00
(www.xpo-center-bruges.be)
Until 1 September 2019.

FRANCE


PARIS
A Dream of Italy: The Marquis Campana's Collection 

Between the 1830s and the 1850s Giampietro Campana amassed the 19th century's largest private collection, with more than 12,000 archaeological artefacts, paintings, sculptures and objets d'art, both ancient and modern. The collection was dispersed in 1861, and many items ended up in the Louvre and the State Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg. Both institutions have joined to create an overview of the collection through a range of more than 500 works, including The Sarcophagus of the Spouses (above), an Etruscan terracotta masterpiece dating from circa 520–510 BC.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 18 February 2019.

PARIS
Archaeology goes Graphic

The latest offering in the Petite Galerie, the Louvre's space devoted to art and cultural education for all, examines the relationship between archaeology and the art of the comic book, known in France as 'the 9th art'. With archaeological discoveries, such as a terracotta nude from 2340–1500 BC (above), and comics and drawings, visitors can learn about the work of the archaeologist from the 19th century onwards. Sketchbooks have their place in archaeology as in graphic art, but as well as this tool, the two subjects have more in common. While archaeologists are not the most frequent characters in comics, they do occasionally appear along with excavations and their spectacular discoveries, in imaginative illustrated stories that combine fact and fiction, mythical figures, places and objects.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 26 September 2018
to 1 July 2019.

 

NETHERLANDS


AMSTERDAM
All the Rembrandts of the Rijksmuseum

To commemorate the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt's death, the Rijksmuseum has declared that 2019 is the 'Year of Rembrandt'. The celebrations begin with an exhibition entitled All the Rembrandts of the Rijksmuseum which, as the title suggests, displays all 22 paintings, 60 drawings, and more than 300 prints by the artist from its permanent collections. With such a large assortment of works (it houses the largest collection of Rembrandt paintings in the world), the Rijksmuseum is able to offer a comprehensive tour through the artist's career. As well as fragile and rarely exhibited drawings, there are self-portraits, depictions of his wife Saskia, and of figures from society around him. His compositions based on episodes from the Old Testament show his great gift as a storyteller. Highlights of the show include his much-loved paintings, The Night Watch, 1642, (above), The Jewish Bride, 1667, and the exquisite pair of wedding portraits of husband and wife, Marten Soolmans and Oopjen Coppit, 1634.
Rijksmuseum
+31 20 674 7000
(www.rijksmuseum.nl)
From 15 February to
10 June 2019.

QATAR


DOHA
Syria Matters

To celebrate its 10th anniversary, Doha's Museum of Islamic Art is drawing on its rich collection of material from Syria to present a comprehensive survey of the country's remarkable cultural heritage. Supplemented by loans from international institutions, the exhibition looks at extraordinary but devastated ancient cities, such as Palmyra and Aleppo, and features installations that immerse visitors in key sites such as the Umayyad mosque of Damascus and the citadel of Aleppo. Highlights include: a wooden interior of a private house in Damascus; a 9th-century BC basalt bird of prey from Tell Halaf; a 3rd-century AD relief from Palmyra showing a camel; and the 'Cavour Vase' (above)– a sumptuous eample of an enamelled and gilded glass vessel made in Syria, or Egyp,t in the late 13th century AD.
Museum of Islamic Art
+974 4422 4444
(www.mia.org.qa)
From 23 November to
13 February 2019.

SPAIN


BILBAO
Alberto Giacometti: A Retrospective

With their long, sinewy forms the sculptures of Giacometti (above) are easily recognisable. The artist often worked in bronze, but, as this exhibition shows, he also had a great interest in more malleable, fragile materials, such as plaster. His work in different materials, paintings and drawings have been brought together to chart his creative output over 40 years. There is a particular focus on the art and insightful archival material gathered together by
his widow Annette, now in the Fondation Giacometti in Paris.
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 24 February 2019.


BILBAO
Van Gogh to Picasso: The Thannhauser Legacy

Following in his father Heinrich's footsteps, Justin Thannhauser was also a prominent art dealer who promoted the spread of modern art in 20th-century Europe. Since 1965, the Guggenheim in New York has housed the Thannhauser Collection, but now a significant portion of it is travelling from one Guggenheim museum to another. Works by Cézanne, Degas, Manet, Picasso and Van Gogh – including his Mountains at Saint-Rémy, 1889 (below) – are on display at the Guggenheim in Bilbao, showing how these and other artists developed innovative practices to capture the social and environmental changes at the start of the 20th century. As well as works on paper, paintings and sculpture, archival material, such as stock books, and photographs demonstrate the Thannhauser family's pivotal role in the dissemination of this art.
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 24 March 2019.


MADRID
Dalí and Surrealism in the ABANCA Art Collection

Spanish artists, notably Salvador Dalí (1904–89) and Joan Miró (1893–1983), played an important part in Surrealism. This show of 13 Surrealist paintings from the ABANCA art collection tracks the development of the movement from the 1920s to the 1970s, with artists from both Spain and further afield. Works by Miró, executed at two different stages in his career, in the 1930s and 1976, demonstrate the evolution of his style; while paintings by Italian artist Giorgio de Chirico (1888–1978) clearly show that he was an influential forerunner of the Surrealist movement. Among the highlights are dream landscapes by Dalí, such as West Side of the island of the Dead/Cour ouest de L'Ile des morts – obsession reconstitutive d'apres Böcklin, 1934 (above). The ABANCA Art Collection is one of the most important corporate artistic initiatives in Spain and it currently holds 1,343 works by 239 artists.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 27 January 2019.

 


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