Events


UNITED KINGDOM

BARNARD CASTLE, Co Durham
The Allure of Napoleon

Napoleon Bonaparte both fascinated and was admired by many, among his own subjects and also abroad. Among them were John and Joséphine Bowes, the founders of the Bowes Museum. To begin the celebrations marking the museum's 125th anniversary, this exhibition features works from the permanent collections, which reflect the Bowes' keen interest in Napoleon and his impact on the fine and decorative arts. The artefacts on show include paintings, prints, sculpture and books – all of which chart the rise and fall of Napoleon and the emergence of his cult.
The Bowes Museum
+44 (0)1833 690606
(www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk)
Until 19 March 2017.

BATH
Bruegel: Defining a Dynasty

In the UK's first exhibition devoted to the Bruegel family, 35 works have been brought together to showcase the originality and diversity of four generations of these talented artists. As well as loans from the National Gallery, Royal Collection Trust, the National Trust, the Fitzwilliam Museum, the Ashmolean Museum and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, paintings from the Holburne's own collection will be on show, including one of the highlights, Wedding Dance in the Open Air. Previously thought to be the work of a copyist, recent conservation work and analysis has now firmly attributed this oil painting to Pieter Bruegel the Younger.
The Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388569
(www.holburne.org)
Until 4 June 2017.


BRISTOL
Warrior Treasures: Saxon Gold from the Staffordshire Hoard

Discovered in a field near Lichfield in 2009, the Staffordshire Hoard consists of around 4000 pieces that exhibit the finest quality Anglo-Saxon craftsmanship. Some 100 spectacular artefacts, predominantly fittings from swords and seaxes (fighting knives) made of gold and silver and adorned with gems – like this gold and garnet bird of prey (above) – are on show, some for the first time, in this touring exhibition, which tells the story of their discovery and of the elite warrior class during turbulent times in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia.
Bristol Museum & Art Gallery
+44 (0)117 922 3571
(www.bristolmuseums.org.uk)
Until 23 April 2017.

CAMBRIDGE
Houghton's Emperors: Portraits and Power

Marble busts of Roman emperors Commodus (above) and Septimius Severus, normally on display at Houghton Hall, are now on show in the Fitzwilliam. The display looks at the enduring power of portraits and places these busts both in their ancient and their 18th-century contexts.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 23 April 2017.


Madonnas and Miracles: The Holy Home in Renaissance Italy
Exploring the practice of religious devotion in the privacy of the Italian Renaissance home, this exhibition brings together books, jewellery, ceramics, sculpture and paintings from across the country, and juxtaposes fine works of art, such as Virgin and Child (above) by Botticelli (1444–1510), alongside more homely artefacts. The exhbitis bear witness to the relationship between spirituality, domesticity and materiality during a period that is often seen in a more secular light.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 7 March to 4 June 2017.

DULWICH
Vanessa Bell (1879-1961)

The first major exhibition of the work of Vanessa Bell, a key figure of the Bloomsbury Group, takes a close look at her pioneering work in portraiture, still life and landscape, and in decorative arts. With some 100 oil paintings on show, along with fabrics and works on paper, Bell's experiments with abstraction, colour and form will be explored. Among the key works on display are her portraits, including one of her sister Virginia Woolf (above), and her decorative designs for furniture.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0) 20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk/)
From 8 February to 4 June 2017.


EDINBURGH
The Tomb: Ancient Egyptian Burial

This fascinating exhibition tells the story of 1000 years of use and reuse of one ancient Egyptian tomb in Thebes. Built circa 1290 BC for the chief of police and his wife, it was looted and reused a number of times over the centuries until the early 1st century AD when, shortly after the Roman conquest of Egypt, it was sealed when an entire family was interred in it. The tomb then remained intact until it was excavated in the 19th century, preserving an array of stunning finds from various eras in ancient Egypt, all reflecting the wish to remember the deceased, to protect their bodies and to provide for their spirits in the Underworld. Among the highlights on show are a cedarwood, ebony and ivory box made for Amenhotep II (see the news item on page 4), amulets, a gilded mummy mask and the painted sacrophagus of the priest Nehemsumut (above) from Thebes, circa 840–815 BC.
National Museum of Scotland
+44 (0)300 123 6789
(www.nms.ac.uk)
From 31 March to 3 September 2017.

HULL
Pietro Lorenzetti: Siena to Hull, a Masterpiece Revealed

The re-opening of the Ferens Art Gallery after a £5.2m refurbishment marked the start of Hull's year as the UK's City of Culture and has this new exhibition, with Christ between Saints Peter and Paul, a rare early Renaissance painting by Pietro Lorenzetti, dating from circa 1320, at its heart. The panel painting has undergone extensive conservation at the National Gallery, which has loaned works by artists including Giotto and Cimabue for this show.
Ferens Art Gallery
+44 (0)1482 300 300
(www.hcandl.co.uk/ferens)
Until 23 April 2017.

LONDON
The American Dream: Pop to the Present

With more than 200 works by 70 artists, this major exhibition charts six decades of American printmaking from the birth of Pop Art in the early 1960s, through Minimalism, Conceptual art and photorealism, to the present. Bold, innovative prints from the latter half of the 20th century responded to contemporary events and burning issues, such as President Kennedy's assassination in 1963, the Vietnam War, the struggle for civil rights, the AIDS crisis, feminism and the power and influence of the USA. Loans from New York's Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC and other institutions, as well as work from the British Museum's own collections, by an array of America's most celebrated artists including Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Bourgeois, and Ed Ruscha whose screenprint, Standard Station, (above) will be on display.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(www.americandreamexhibition.org)
From 9 March to 18 June 2017.

Places of the Mind: British Watercolour Landscapes 1850–1950
The perception that the 'Great Age of British Watercolours' ended when Turner died in 1851 is being challenged in this display of 125 landscapes. Ranging from Pre-Raphaelite works by George Price Boyce and Alfred William Hunt to more abstract pieces by Henry Moore, the selection shows a variety of techniques, styles, and responses to the cultural and social shifts of the time. The landscapes bear witness to the effects of tourism, urbanisation, artists' colonies and the aftermath of war. Highlights include John Singer Sargent's View from a Window, Genoa, circa 1911 (above).
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
From 23 February to 27 August 2017.

Embroidered Tales and Woven Dreams
Traditional embroidered, hand-woven textiles found along the Silk Road are on show, offering insights into the colours of natural dyes, stitches, patterns, motifs, and the journeys made by woven cotton, wool and silk along the ancient trade routes around the lands of the Indus, Afghanistan, Sogdiana, the Near East and Central Asia.
Brunei Gallery, SOAS
+44 (0)20 7898 4046
(www.soas.ac.uk/gallery)
Until 25 March 2017.

Cagnacci's Repentant Magdalene: An Italian Baroque Masterpiece from the Norton Simon Museum
The erotically charged, monumental (229.2cm x 266.1cm) Repentant Magdalene (above), painted circa 1660–61, is often considered Guido Cagnacci's greatest work. Now on loan from the Norton Simon Museum in California, this painting offers a rare chance to see a work by one of the most unconventional and sensual artists of the Italian Baroque, whose paintings do not appear in any UK public collections.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 21 May 2017.



Michelangelo & Sebastiano
Charting the artistic relationship between Michelangelo and Sebastiano del Piombo, from the 1510s to the 1540s, this exhibition brings together a range of works by both artists, singly, their collaborations, and even their intimate correspondence. The themes covered include their work before meeting, their parting of ways, how each artist treated the death and resurrection of Christ, approaches towards figure and characterisation, and their influence on one another. Del Piombo's sympathetic Mary and Elizabeth (The Visitation) circa 1518–19 (above) is one of the works that are on display.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 15 March to
25 June 2017.

America after the Fall: Painting in the 1930s
A complement to the British Museum's American Dream exhibition, this focuses on the Great Depression, which left America facing major challenges in the years following the Wall Street Crash. Mass urbanisation, industrialisation and immigration are all reflected in American art of the 1930s. Among the 45 works are paintings by Jackson Pollock, Georgia O'Keefe, Edward Hopper and Grant Wood, whose iconic American Gothic is on display outside North America for the first time.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 4 June 2017.

Wolfgang Tillmans
Photographs, video, digital slide projections and recorded music all make up contemporary artist Wolfgang Tillmans' first exhibition at the Tate Modern. The works, which include astro custo, 2012, (above), look at the state of the world today, using 2003, the year of the invasion of Iraq and anti-war demonstrations, as a key turning-point. Portraiture, landscape and still life all feature and explore social and political issues.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
Until 11 June 2017.

Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London
Lockwood Kipling (1837–1911), who championed the preservation of Indian crafts and architecture, was a leading figure in the Arts and Crafts movement and he helped to shape the founding collection of the V&A. To this day his terracotta panels can be seen decorating the exterior of the museum. So the V&A is the natural home for the first exhibition devoted to his life and work. Organised in collaboration with the Bard Graduate Center, New York, its highlights include the bookplate (above) he designed for his son, the Poet Laureate Rudyard. Also on show are his sketches of craftspeople in India and the objects he selected there for the V&A, as well as furniture he designed for royal residences Bagshot Park and Osborne. He is, of course, surpassed in fame by his son, with whom he collaborated. Editions of works illustrated by Lockwood inspired by the time father and son spent in India, include The First and The Second Jungle Book and Kim, by Rudyard Kipling.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 2 April 2017.

Tales from Ovid's Metamorphoses
Ovid's poem of transformations, the Metamorphoses, tells the story of the Roman world from the creation of the universe up to the apotheosis of Julius Caesar, through myths. His versions of Graeco-Roman myths have proven popular with artists across the centuries, as this display shows. Painting, ceramics, including a fine porcelain vase from the Sèvres factory (above), all show the lasting influence of the great Roman poet. Wallace Collection
+44 (0)207 563 9500
(www.wallacecollection.org)
Until 2 April June 2017.


Portrait of the Artist

Exquisite portraits of, and by, some of the world's greatest artists in the Royal Collection have been amassed by monarchs since Charles I, one of the first European royal collectors. More than 150 works explore how the image of the artist has changed from the 15th century to the present day. Among the highlights are Artemisia Gentileschi's Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting (La Pittura) circa 1638–39 (above), one of Rembrandt's many self-portraits, and a self-portrait by Rubens, which he gave to Charles as an apology for sending him a work by studio assistants. Self-portraits by Lucian Freud and David Hockney, which have been presented to HM The Queen, bring the collection up to date. As well as self-portraits, depictions of artists by their contemporaries are featured, including Francesco Melzi's drawing of his teacher Leonardo, and Rubens' portrait of his friend and former assistant, Van Dyck.
The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)20 7766 7300
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
Until 17 April 2017.

Revolution: Russian Art 1917–1932
Marking the centenary of the Russian Revolution, this exhibition surveys Russian art from 1917, the year of the October Revolution, to 1932, when Stalin began to suppress the Avant-Garde. Among more than 200 works on show will be pieces by Avant-Garde artists, such as Chagall and Kandinsky, in a variety of media, including paintings, photography, posters, sculpture and film, as well as Suprematists and Socialist Realists. Many of the works are on display in the UK for the first time and are on loan from the State Russian Museum in St Petersburg and the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow; they include Boris Mikhailovich Kustodiev's Bolshevik, 1920 (above).
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 11 February to 17 April 2017.


America after the Fall: Painting in the 1930s

A critical period of the 20th century for America was the Great Depression, which followed the Wall Street Crash. Changes such as mass urbanisation, industrialisation and immigration are all reflected in American art of the 1930s. Among the 45 paintings in this exhibition are works by Jackson Pollock, Georgia O'Keefe, Edward Hopper and Grant Wood, whose iconic American Gothic, 1930 (above), travels outside North America for the first time.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 25 February to 4 June 2017.


The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection

One of the world's greatest private collections of photography forms the basis of the exhibition, which showcases over 150 examples of classic modernist work from the 1920s to the 1950s. Over 60 artists are represented, including André Kertész, Berenice Abbot, Alexander Rodchenko and Edward Steichen, plus Man Ray's portraits of Matisse, Picasso and Breton and his Les Larmes (Glass Tears) 1932 (above).
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
Until 7 May 2017.

Game Plan: Board Games Rediscovered
Taking a look the development of the board game – from the ancient Egyptian game Senet to modern digital board games – the examples in this display comes from the V&A's collection. It celebrates both the design of the games and the fun that players can have. As well as iconic 20th-century games, such as Monopoly, Cluedo and Trivial Pursuit, historical games, like the Game of the Goose, will also be on show. The ancient game of chess is represented and it includes an Alice in Wonderland set (above) made by Robin and Nell Dale in 1983.
Victoria and Albert Museum
of Childhood
+44 (0)20 8983 5200
(www.vam.ac.uk/moc)
Until 23 April 2017.

Electricity: The Spark of Life
How have people tried to understand and master the power of electricity throughout history? This exhibition centres on the generation, supply and consumption of this powerful but deadly force that we all depend on today, exploring these themes through photography, paintings and a variety of objects, including electrostatic generators and ancient amber used to make sparks.
Wellcome Collection
+44 (0)20 7611 2222
(www.wellcomecollection.org)
From 23 February to 25 June 2017.

Australia's Impressionists
Some 40 loans from Australian public and private collections, and from private collections in the UK, are brought together to present a wider view of Impressionism. Many of the works on show have never been seen in the UK before. They show how a distinctive Impressionist movement took root in Australia and helped to establish a new national identity. Paintings by Charles Conder, John Russell, Tom Roberts and Arthur Streeton, such as the latter's Ariadne, 1895 (above) all feature.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 7 December to 26 March 2017.

Seduction and Celebrity: The Spectacular Life of Emma Hamilton
Born the daughter of a Cheshire blacksmith in 1765, Emma, Lady Hamilton embodies an extraordinary example of social climbing. She was renowned for her beauty and her relationship with Horatio, Lord Nelson. While still in her teens, she became George Romney's muse and several of his paintings and drawings of her are on show, along with works by Sir Joshua Reynolds, Sir Thomas Lawrence and others, including Tomas Prioli (above, he portrays Emma in a Classical pose). Among the 200 objects on show are letters between Emma and her lovers, some of which reflect her political influence, her songbooks, clothing and jewellery, including the betrothal ring given to her by Nelson.
National Maritime Museum
+44 (0)20 8858 4422
(www.rmg.co.uk)
From 3 November to 17 April 2017.

Opening up the Soane
The seven-year Opening up the Soane programme has now been completed, and Sir John Soane's Museum has been returned to the architect's original design for his Georgian house-museum, allowing it to be seen as he intended. A number of lost spaces have been re-created and opened to visitors for the first time, and the museum now has full step-free access. Among the restored areas are the kitchens, the ante-room and the catacombs in the basement, the lobby to the breakfast room (above), and the Apollo recess. The museum's candlelit evenings will continue to take place on the first Tuesday of each month.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+44 (0)20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
Ongoing.

Defacing the past: Damnation and Desecration in Imperial Rome
A look at the fascinating Roman act of damnatio memoriae, where a mention of a particular person – be it their name or image – is struck from the record. For instance, an overthrown emperor's memory could be condemned or erased in this way by his successors. Though the focus is primarily on coinage (above), inscriptions, papyri and sculpture will also be on show.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
From 13 October 2016
to 7 May 2017.


Fire! Fire!
In 1666 much of London went up in smoke; now, 350 years later, Fire! Fire! recreates Pudding Lane (where the fire started) and tells the story of the Great Fire, seen in a view from Ludgate, painted circa 1670-1678 (above). It looks at life in London on the eve of the blaze and at how the city recovered. On display are letters with eyewitness accounts, paintings, and surviving damaged artefacts that reveal the full force of the flames.
Museum of London
+44 (0)20 7001 9844
(www.museumoflondon.org.uk)
Until 17 April 2017.


The View from Here: Landscape Photography from the National Galleries of Scotland

As part of the Institute for Photography in Scotland's Season of Photography 2016, views of landmarks from across the world from the 1840s to today are now on show. The works include inspiring images of historic sites, such as the 1858 albumin print of the Great Pyramid and the Sphinx (above) by Francis Frith, and of natural wonders like Niagara Falls. It also reveals the evolving photographic processes.
Scottish National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 30 April 2017.

Bridget Riley: Paintings, 1963-2015
This exhibition charts Bridget Riley's dramatic use of monochrome and colour throughout her career, from her exclusively black and white paintings in the early to mid-1960s, to her transition to grey in the late 1960s and, then, on to colour. More recently she has returned to monochrome but, although Riley has taken up a palette from the past, her latest monochromatic works show new ideas developed from her paintings in colour.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 16 September 2017.

OXFORD
The Legacy of Alexander the Great

This display looks at the impact that Alexander the Great had on coinage, which had previously been centred mainly around the Mediterranean world, and which he extended to the east for the first time with his conquest of the Persian Empire. Alexander is said to have created one of the first truly international currencies as he issued vast numbers of coins at many different mints across his extensive domain.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
Until 23 April 2017.

Degas to Picasso: Creating Modernism in France
The story of the rise of Modernism in France is told through the works of some of the greatest artists in the country, including Manet, Pisarro, Cézanne, Picasso and Degas, from around 1800 to the mid-20th century. Starting with the Romantic artists David, Gericault and Delacroix, this show looks at the departure from tradition and follows the winding route to abstraction and Paris where ideas were exchanged in bohemian spheres. An interesting watercolour by Degas, St John the Baptist and the Angel, 1857–8, (above) is one of the works on show.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
Until 7 May 2017.



LIVERPOOL
Tracey Emin and William Blake in Focus

In a curious pairing, Tracey Emin's infamous work My Bed is displayed in the north of England for the first time in an exhibition, which explores the links between her and poet and artist William Blake. Born some 200 years apart, both artists' work shows a preoccupation with spirituality, birth and death. Among pieces on show by Blake are his colour print, Pity, circa 1795 (above) The Blasphemer and The Crucifixion: 'Behold Thy Mother'.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)151 702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 3 September 2017.

SALISBURY
Constable in Context: Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows in Perspective

Of his painting Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows, 1831 (above), John Constable wrote, 'I am told I got it to look better than anything have yet done.' One of the artist's vast canvases, he called it 'The Great Salisbury'. Now, after touring the UK, the work has reached home as the centrepiece of an exhibition of images of the city's cathedral, from the 17th to the 21st centuries. These include works by JMW Turner, Frederick Nash, Henrick de Cort and Frederick MacKenzie. But, as The Great Salisbury shows, Constable was not just another artist who painted a view of the cathedral; his canvas had a notable impact on later artists, and marked a transition from purely architectural representation to personal expression, with a real feeling for the subject.
Salisbury Museum
+ 44 (0)1722 332151
(www.salisburymuseum.org.uk)
Until 25 March 2017.

UNITED STATES


NEW YORK, New York
Splendors of Korean Art

Loans from the National Museum of Korea, including Silla gold jewellery and pottery, Goryeo Buddhist sculpture, celadon ware and Joseon porcelain and paintings, join pieces from the Met's own collections to present a chronological tour of Korea's art history from the Late Bronze Age to the 21st century. In more than 70 works displayed, the highlights include the Goryeo Buddhist 14th-century gilded Amitabha Triad (above) from the National Museum of Korea, which is shown near the Met's 7th-century Pensive Bodhisattva and 17th-century Seated Bodhisattva, reflecting the long-continued tradition of Buddhist art. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 17 September 2017.

Infinite Blue
The colour blue has been used to represent spirituality, power, status and beauty in a range of cultures throughout history. Following one common strand, the blue artworks on display from across the globe reveal information about cultural values, technological advances, and international trade. As part of  A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum (a series of exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A Sackler Center for Feminist Art), Infinite Blue features paintings, prints, drawings, decorative arts, printed books and more. Among the highlights are illuminated manuscripts exemplifying the use of blue in Christian iconography, early Chinese blue-and-white porcelain, and a stunning blue faience, late 2nd-century statuette of Aphrodite (above) from Ptolemaic Egypt.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 5 November 2017.

A Woman's Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt
Also part of the Brooklyn Museum's series A Year of Yes, this exhibition delves into the ancient Egyptian belief that to make rebirth possible for a deceased woman, she must briefly turn into a man long enough to create a foetus. This is because, according to Egyptian medicine, the man creates the foetus and passes it on to the woman during sex. Evidence for this post-mortem gender transformation can be seen in coffins on which a woman is depicted with red skin (more commonly a male attribute) and on which spells that address the deceased with masculine pronouns are recorded. As well as painted sarcophagi, like the Coffin of the Lady of the House, circa 1292-1190 BC (above), small statuettes are on display, showing the woman returned to her female state after recreating herself for rebirth.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until end 2017.

Renaissance Maiolica: Painted Pottery for Shelf and Table
Maufactured in Italy from the 15th to the 17th centuries, this beautifully painted and tin-glazed earthenware took the form of many practical objects, such as tableware, serving vessels, storage containers and desk accessories, as well as devotional objects and sculpture. Maiolica works were created with harmony between form and function, and were immensely valued for artistic reasons by Italy's elite. Renaissance Italian potters drew on techniques that were used in the Islamic world, which they combined with innovations in contemporary goldsmithing, sculpture and painting to create exquisitely decorated pieces of maiolica. These in turn influenced tin-glazed pottery elsewhere in Europe.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 29 May 2017.


PRINCETON, New Jersey
The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early 5th Century BC

Since 1911 when Sir John Beazley first published his identification of the otherwise anonymous Berlin Painter, the total number of complete and fragmentary vases attributed to this talented Attic artist has expanded to some 330 pieces. Celebrated for his elegant style, the painter influenced other vase painters of the period whose works will also be shown in this exhibition. There are 54 vase-paintings by the Berlin Painter, and a further 30 by other artists including his teacher Phintias, his principal rival the Kleophrades Painter, his students Hermonax, the Providence Painter, and the Achilles Painter, and followers such as the Dutuit Painter and the Tithonos Painter. The range both of subjects depicted and sizes of vessels show the wider context of 5th-century Athens. Among the highlights by the Berlin Painter are his name-vase from Berlin, a red-figure amphora with a fawn between Hermes and a satyr, and a hydria depicting Apollo seated on top of a winged tripod from the Vatican (above).
Princeton University Art Museum
+1 609 258 3788
(artmuseum.princeton.edu)
From 4 March to 11 June 2017.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
Auguste Rodin: The Centenary Installation

Commemorating the centenary of Auguste Rodin's death in 1917, this show presents a selection of some
50 objects in bronze, marble and plaster by 'the father of modern sculpture' all from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's permanent collection. Following the course of his career from his early sculptures, remarkable for their high naturalism, to his later prestige and enduring appeal, the works on show include his graceful life-size bronze male nude, entitled The Age of Bronze (above), models in plaster, and pieces related to his most ambitious and iconic projects, including The Burghers of Calais, The Gates of Hell and The Thinker.
Legion of Honor, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
+1 415 750 3600
(famsf.org)
Until 9 April 2017.

WASHINGTON DC
Inventing Utamaro: A Japanese Masterpiece Rediscovered

For the first time since 1879, all three original parts of a triptych painting by the celebrated ukiyo-e artist Kitagawa Utamaro (1753–1806) will be displayed together. The large-scale painting group explores the classical Japanese themes, moon and flowers, with stylised figures of beautiful women, as was characteristic of Utamaro (who became known as a connoisseur of female beauty) and other ukiyo-e painters. The three original pieces, Moon at Shinagawa (above ) from the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art, Fukagawa in the Snow, from the Okada Museum of Art in Hakone, Japan, and Cherry Blossoms at Yoshiwara, from the collection of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, Connecticut, have been reunited only at the Sackler Gallery due to loan restrictions. Other items on view, such as prints and illustrated books, demonstrate how ukiyo-e artists working within studios would re-use compositions and themes, and place Utamaro's triptych in the context of Japonisme and collecting and connoisseurship at the turn of the 20th century.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
From 8 April to 9 July 2017.

Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence
The glazing technique invented by the 15th-century Florentine sculptor Luca della Robbia (1399/1400–82) characterises the terracotta sculptures produced by three generations of the Della Robbia family, still spectacular today with their vivid colours – brilliant blues, whites, greens, purples and yellows. Innovative and expressive Della Robbia works on display include reliefs of Prudence, 1475 (above) portraits, household statuettes and architectural decoration, along with sculptures by a rival firm, the workshop of Benedetto Buglioni (1459/1460–1521) and his apprentice Santi Buglioni (1494–1576).
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
Until 4 June 2017.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania Magic in the Ancient World
Closely connected with science and religion, magic was very much a part of life in many ancient cultures. More than 80 artefacts from the Penn Museum's collections conjure up mystical worlds of rituals in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome. Protection amulets, rings, curse tablets, anatomical votives, magical stones and incantation bowls all reflect how ancient people turned to the supernatural for a wide range of reasons, from health and well-being to protection from evil, to revenge and special help in the afterlife.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.museum)
Until 30 April 2017.

CHICAGO, Illinois
Tattoo

The art of tattooing has been in practice for more than 5000 years. Among the objects on show in this exhibition are a commemorative 17th-century tattoo stamp for Christian pilgrims to Jerusalem, a female figurine from Alaska with the chin tattoos once worn by Yupik women (above) and contemporary tattoos on silicon models.
Field Museum
+1 312 922 9410
(www.fieldmuseum.org)
From 21 October 2016 to
30 April 2017.


Chinamania
Sculptor Walter McConnell's new installation, A Theory of Everything: Dark Stupa consists of more than 50 pieces of blue-and-white Chinese porcelain from the Kangxi period (1661-1722), and a hanging piece he has made from 3D scans of them. Also on show are two vast sculptutures, which McConnell terms stupas (one is shown above). Each made of more than 800 of his own porcelain figures, they present a striking contrast between the historic originals and their mass-produced imitations.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
Until 4 June 2017.


FRANCE


PARIS
Masterpieces of the Leiden Collection: The Age of Rembrandt

In a season celebrating the Dutch Golden Age, the Louvre is exhibiting a selection of 17th-century works from the private collection of Thomas Kaplan and Daphne Recanati Kaplan – the largest private collection of works by Rembrandt. Some 30 paintings and drawings reveal the talents of Golden Age painters from the Leiden region as well as Rembrandt, whose 10 works on show include the large-format Minerva in her Study (above). The exhibition also features works by Frans van Mieris, Gerrit Dou and Jan Steen.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 53 17
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 22 May 2017.

Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting
Also part of the Louvre's exploration of the Dutch Golden Age is this exhibition on Johannes Vermeer, which for the first time since 1966 brings together 12 of his paintings (representing a third of his total known body of work), including loans from American, British, German and Dutch collections, with comparative pieces by other artists of the day. His work is seen in the context of the Golden Age and the development of a new wave of genre painting in the early 1650s that portrayed an idealised elegant domesticity, as can be seen in The Milkmaid, 1657–58 (above).
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 53 17
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 22 May 2017.

The Body in Movement: Dance and the Museum
Spanning antiquity to the 20th century, this new Petite Galerie exhibition presents some 70 pieces that highlight diverse responses to the challenge of capturing movement in artworks that are, by nature, static. Together, they offer a chance to examine conventions of the representation of movement and postures, including walking, running, stopping in one's tracks, and even the movement of the soul, for example through fear. The history of artists' attempts to anatomise movement, long before the advent of chronophotography, is told through the work of artists such as Degas and Rodin, and famed dancers, such as Isadora Duncan and Vaslav Nijinsky. Highlights of the exhibition include Ancient Egyptian figures, such as this ofine example that dates from circa 1800 BC (above), and images on Ancient Greek red and black figure vases. The show includes loans from Musée Rodin, the Musée d'Orsay and the Centre Pompidou.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 53 17
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 3 July 2017.

Mexico 1900-1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco and the Avant-garde

This exhibition tells the fascinating story of Mexican art in the first half of the 20th century, and indeed beyond, with a few contemporary works on show. Organised by the Réunion des musées nationaux-Grand Palais and Mexico's Secretaría de Cultura, Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes and Museo Nacional de Arte, it starts with Symbolism and Decadentism at the turn of the century, then explores how artists like Diego Rivera responded to the Parisian avant-garde. The Mexican Revolution (1910-20) is a critical event in the nation's history and led to a new national identity, with muralism becoming a popular mode of creative expression, as exemplified by the works of Rivera (again), David Alfaro Siqueiros and José Clemente Orozco. The Revolution meant that women could take a much more active role in contributing to the economy, in turn allowing them to become prominent artists and benefactresses. A number of female painters such as Frida Kahlo, Nahui Olin and Rosa Rolanda, and photographers Tina Modotti and Lola Álvarez Bravo are also featured.
Grand Palais
+33 1 44 13 17 17
(www.grandpalais.fr)
Until 23 January 2017.

GERMANY


BERLIN
Dangerous Perfection: Ancient Funerary Vases from Apulia

Some 13 impressive funerary vases from Ceglie del Campo in Apulia (recently conserved as part of a joint project with the J Paul Getty Museum in LA after enduring wartime and postwar damage) are on show. The vases, which shed light on ancient upper-class burial customs, are richly decorated with scenes from Greek mythology, such as the fight against the Chimera shown on the one (above). They were restored in the 19th century by Raffaele Garguilo (1785–1870); at the time his reconstructions were described as a 'dangerous perfection'.
Altes Museum
+49 30 266 42 42 42
(www.smb.museum)
Until 18 June 2017.



ISRAEL
JERUSALEM
Gods, Heroes and Mortals in Ancient Greece

Greek vases had a variety of functions and the finest examples were richly decorated with scenes from the mythological world or with figures from the realm of men, such as athletes and warriors as in the Attic red-figure lekythos made circa 470–450 BC (above). This exhibition explores depictions of gods and mortals on pots ranging from the second millennium BC to the end of the 5th century BC. It also offers an insight into the manufacture and usage of the pots.
Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem
+972 2 561 1066
(www.blmj.org)
Until June 2018.

QATAR
DOHA
Picasso-Giacometti

A collaboration between Qatar Museums, the Musée National Picasso and the Fondation Giacometti, this is the first exhibition showing the work of Pablo Picasso and Alberto Giacometti in the Middle East. More than 80 works, including paintings –such as Self-Portrait by Giacometti, circa 1923 (above) – sculpture and drawings, by the two artists have been brought together to explore the relationship between them and their work. The pieces displayed chart their development as young artists, the influence of Surrealism and their post-war return to Realism.
The Fire Station Artist in Residence
+974 4452 5555
(firestation.org.qa)
Until 21 May 2017.


SPAIN
BILBAO
The Collection of Hermann and Margrit Rupf

Hermann and Margrit Rupf were the first private Swiss collectors to prioritise abstract and contemporary art. This exhibition of 70 pieces from the Rupf Collection features works by their friends Vasily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, and other notable artists whose works were created from 1907 up to the present. Among them are Picasso's Head of a Man from 1908 (above) and artworks by Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Lucio Fontana, Christian Megert, and James Turrell. Guggenheim Museum Bilbao
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.es)
Until 23 April 2017.

MADRID
Masterworks from Budapest: From the Renaissance to the Avant-Garde

While the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest is closed for renovation, some star pieces from its collection are on show in Madrid along with additional loans from the National Gallery of Hungary. A selection of 90 artworks representative of the two Budapest collections as a whole has travelled to Spain,. These span the 15th to the 19th centuries and are by some of the finest of Italian, German, Flemish, Spanish and Hungarian artists. Highlights include works by Leonardo, Dürer, Velázquez and Rubens, such as his painting Mucius Scaevola before Lars Porsenna, 1618–20 (above).
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 28 May 2017.

EVENTS
DURHAM
Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference 2017

The 27th annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference (TRAC) brings together a range of speakers to discuss aspects of current theory and practice in Roman archaeology and scholarship, including the impact of heritage and of the public. Topics covered include: social boundaries; society and technology; material approaches to medicine and magic; dialectics of religion; the complexity of glass; wells and their contents; luxury items and the military; the production and distribution of food. Dr Hella Eckardt of the University of Reading will give the keynote lecture.
Durham University
28–31 March
(www.trac.org.uk)

LEEDS
Private Collecting and Public Display: Art Markets and Museums

This two-day conference will explore how private collections are displayed in public exhibitions and museums, and attempts to situate the relationship between private home and public museum within the history of the art market and collecting. Topics include: private collecting and public display from the early modern period up to the present day, focusing on temporary loan exhibitions, philanthropy versus self-promotion, legacies of the collector, minority groups and the role of gender. The keynote lecture will be given by Dr Susanna Avery-Quash, Senior Research Curator (History of Collecting) at the National Gallery, London.
Centre for the Study of the Art and Antiques Market, University of Leeds
30–31 March
(www.csaam.leeds.ac.uk)

LONDON
ICS Classical Archaeology Seminar 2016–17: Global Antiquities and Classical Archaeology

The Grapevine Motif from the Classical World to East Asia: Iconographic Transfers across Eurasia in the 1st millenium AD
Marta Zuchowska, University
of Warsaw
The Court Room, Senate House
1 March

Qusayr 'Amra and the continuity of Post-Classical art in early Islam: Towards an Iconology of Forms
Nadia Ali, University of Oxford/British Museum

8 March
Globalisation across the Iranian Plateau: The Visual Culture of the Sacred in the 2nd century BC
Rachel Wood
26 April
Seminars are held at 17.00 in
Room 349, Senate House, University of London
(unless otherwise stated)
(http://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/diary-events/seminar-lecture-series)

London Roman Art Seminar
Supported by the Institute of Classical Studies

Sensing the City: Art and Lived Experience in Ancient Rome and Ostia
Eleanor Betts
13 March

Roman art in the British Museum and Beyond: Context, Connoisseurship and Display
Elizabeth Marlowe
27 March

Ear and Stone: Acoustics, Architecture and Art at Ostia
Jeffrey Veitch
24 April
All seminars are held at 17.30 in Room 243, South Block, Senate House, University of London (www.icls.sas.ac.uk)

Royal Numismatic Society Lectures
Mapping the Nation's Collections: The Money and Medals Network
Henry Flynn
21 March, 18.00–19.30

The Notgeld Collection at the British Museum
Sabrina Ben Aouicha
18 April, 18.00–19.30
The Warburg Institute
(numismatics.org.uk/society-meetings)

Rumble Fund Lecture in Classical Art 2017 Beauty and Classical Form
Art historian Professor Liz Prettejohn (University of York) will give the fourth annual lecture in which she will examine how artists help us understand the beauty of Classical form by looking at the work of the 19th-century painter Frederic, Lord Leighton.
Great Hall, King's Building, Strand Campus, King's College London
15 March, 18.00–19.30
(fourthannualrumblefundlecture.eventbrite.co.uk)

OXFORD
Problems of Chronology in Gandharan Art

The first international workshop of the Gandhara Connections project will tackle chronology and dating. A better knowledge of these subjects will help explain how styles changed and how long the tradition continued. The aim of the workshop is to bring together researchers of art and architectural history, archaeology, numismatics, epigraphy and linguistics to exchange ideas and the most recent information. The proceedings will be available in an open access, online book.
Classical Art Research Centre, University of Oxford
23–24 March
(www.carc.ox.ac.uk)

UNITED STATES
PRINCETON, New Jersey

The Berlin Painter and his World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early 5th Century BC
In conjunction with their exhibition The Berlin Painter and his World, Princeton University Art Museum, together with the Department of Art and Archaeology, will host a one-day symposium of talks, covering hidden inscriptions by the Berlin Painter identified by Sir John Beazley, and the erotics of connoisseurship, contexts and functions of myth in Classical Athens, and more.
McCormick Hall,
Princeton University
1 April, 09.30–18.00
(www.princeton.edu/visualresources/berlin-painter/)

CANADA
CALGARY

Classical Association of the Canadian West Conference
This year, the annual conference of the Classical Association of the Canadian West will explore the theme of texts, lives and gods. Topics that will be covered include sacred texts, biographies and hagiographies, emotions, mythology and personal expressions of religion. The keynote speaker is Professor Mark Munn from Pennsylvania State University.
University of Calgary
17–18 March
(cacwcalgary.wordpress.com)



NETHERLANDS
MAASTRICHT
TEFAF MAASTRICHT
One of the world's leading fine art and antiquities fairs is returning for its 30th edition. This year, TEFAF Maastricht has selected 270 internationally renowned exhibitors, including 18 new ones, attracting both private and institutional collectors. The dealers exhibiting together present over 7000 years of art history, covering everything from Classical antiquities and antiques to fine jewellery and works on paper. Among the antiquities dealers participating are Charles Ede, Rupert Wace Ancient Art, Galerie Harmakhis, Royal-Athena Galleries and
Cahn International AG whose star exhibits include this fine, early Corinthian helmet (above).
MECC (Maastricht Exhibition and Congress Centre) Maastricht
10–19 March
www.tefaf.com

 

 


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