Events


UNITED KINGDOM


BATH
Henri Matisse: Master of Line

Henri Matisse (1869–1954) is best known for his intensely coloured paintings and collages, but this exhibition, marking the 150th anniversary of the artist's birth, puts the spotlight on his etchings and his considerable skills as a draughtsman. With around 20 works, the show presents some of Matisse's first etchings made between 1914–19, including Figure Endormie sur Fond Moucharabieh, 1919 (above). Matisse's prints from the late 1920s, when he was deeply involved in printmaking, also feature prominently, depicting themes and subjects seen elsewhere in the artist's output at this time, such as female nudes in ornate interiors.
Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388569
(www.holburne.org)
From 18 September
to 5 January 2020.


BATH
Rembrandt in Print

Another exhibition devoted to prints at the Holburne Museum (organised by the Ashmolean Museum) marks the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt's death in 1669. Some 50 prints from the Ashmolean's collection are on view as part of a national tour. The works show Rembrandt's technical accomplishments, his varied, expressive techniques, and his powerful manner of telling a story. As well as landscapes, religious subjects and self-portraits (including an etching called Self-portrait open-mouthed, as if shouting, 1630, above), the prints include everyday scenes, such as family studies and streestcapes.
Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388569
(www.holburne.org)
From 4 October to
5 January 2020.

BIRMINGHAM
Truly Bright and Memorable: Jan de Beer's Altarpieces for Renaissance Antwerp

To celebrate the recent conservation of the Barber collection's panel painting of Joseph and the Suitors (front of panel) (above ) and The Nativity (reverse) by Jan de Beer (circa 1475–circa 1527), this exhibition puts the work (thought to be part of depicting the life of the Virgin Mary) centre stage. Complemented by loans from various European collections, the presentation of the Flemish artist's work sheds light on the Antwerp Mannerists
with their expressively posed figures and elaborate architecture.
Barber Institute of Fine Arts
+44 (0)121 414 7333
(barber.org.uk)
From 25 October to
19 January 2019.



BIRMINGHAM

A Tale of Two Empires: Rome and Persia
Late Roman and Sasanian coins from the Barber's collection tell the story of the tumultuous relationship between the Roman and the Persian empires from the 3rd to the 7th centuries AD. Images on the coins and on seals on loan from the Fitzwilliam Museum bear portraits of kings and emperors – such as the silver antoninianus (above) of Valerian I (AD 253–260), – and also tell stories of bloody conflicts, political alliances, artistic exchanges, betrayals and revenge.
Barber Institute of Fine Arts
+44 (0)121 414 7333
(barber.org.uk)
Until 15 March 2020.


CAMBRIDGE
The Celebrated Mr Belzoni

Giovanni Battista Belzoni (1778–1824), often known as 'The Great Belzoni', was an larger-than-life character and
a pioneering Egyptologist. A 6ft 7in tall circus strongman and an adventurer, Belzoni explored many ancient Egyptian sites and acquired, and sold, antiquities. Among them was the lid of the sarcophagus of Ramesses III, which, in 1823 Belzoni gifted to the Fitzwilliam Museum. Focusing on the posthumous portrait of Belzoni, 1824, by Jan Adam Kruseman, which was presented to the Fitzwilliam last year (through the Arts Council's Cultural Gift Scheme, in honour of ex‐Director, Tim Knox), this show explores Belzoni's life and the allure of ancient Egypt as seen in 19th-century British art.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 10 November 2019.


CAMBRIDGE

Artist Unknown: Art and Artefacts from the University of Cambridge Museums and Collections
Taking a look at an exceptionally diverse range of works from the University of Cambridge's collections that have all been catalogued as 'artist unknown', this exhibition invites the viewer to consider why we remember some creators and not others, and how colonialism and exploration have shaped collections. The exhibits come from around the world and span many centuries. Among them are a painted ancient Egyptian coffin fragment which bears the fingerprints of its maker, ornate bark cloth from the Pacific Islands, forged scientific instruments, and Scrimshaw, such as a whale's tooth engraved with the image of a ship, mid-1820s–1840s (above).
Kettle's Yard
+44 (0)1223 748100
(kettlesyard.co.uk)
Until 22 September 2019.

DITCHLING
Women's Work: Pioneering Women in Craft, 1918–1939

This show celebrates the work of a group of craftswomen active in Britain between the two World Wars, who are often overlooked in favour of their male counterparts. Textile artists, weavers, ceramicists and silversmiths, many of whom drew from their experiences of travelling in the First World War, looked to the past and pre-industrialised techniques to execute their lively designs. As a result, they played an important role in the development of the Arts and Crafts movement and influenced future generations of crafts people. Among the more than 100 works on show are textiles by Phyllis Barron and Dorothy Larcher, ceramics by Denise Wren, cutlery by Catherine 'Catsy' Cobb, and one of Elizabeth Peacock's vast banners for Dartington Hall.
Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft
+44 (0)1273 844744
(www.ditchlingmuseumartcraft.org.uk)
Until to 6 October 2019.


EDINBURGH
Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs

The royal families of Russia and Britain have been linked for many centuries. Now, a rich array of items from the Royal Collection explores the relationship between the two countries, from Peter the Great's visit to London in 1698 to the last emperor of Russia, Nicholas II – a cousin of George V, to whom he bore a close physical resemblance. This exhibition brings together diplomatic gifts and personal family mementoes, highlighting the close bond between the two dynasties. Treasures by Fabergé, photographs, archival documents, and portraits, such as Vigilius Eriksen's portrait of Catherine II, the Empress of Russia, circa 1765–9, (above) tell the story of historic international events and important family meetings.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.rct.uk)
Until 3 November 2019.

HOUGHTON HALL
Henry Moore at Houghton Hall: Nature and Inspiration

Perhaps the most distinctive works of the celebrated 20th-century artist Henry Moore are his vast sculptural groups, often in bronze, that use figurative and abstract elements and are best seen with ample space in the great outdoors. The grounds of Houghton House offer a suitable setting for these monumental works, but this exhibition also brings Henry Moore inside with a selection of smaller sculptures, models and etchings that show his important place in post-war Modernism. Outdoor highlights include the bronze Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae, 1968–69, the fibreglass Large Reclining Figure, 1984, and The Arch, 1963–69 (above).
Houghton Hall
+44 (0)1485 528569
(www.houghtonhall.com)
From 1 May to 29 September 2019.




LIVERPOOL
Keith Haring

Easily recognisable by his energetic style and recurring motifs of flying saucers, barking dogs and crawling babies, the American artist Keith Haring (1958–90) was a leading figure of 1980s counterculture. His busy career was cut short when he died at the age of 31 owing to AIDS-related complications. Haring was dedicated to creating public art in New York, collaborating with other artists, such as Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Tseng Kwong Chi and Grace Jones. He was openly gay and an AIDs activist, as can be seen in his work. He also designed anti-apartheid posters and the famous Crack is Wack mural in Harlem. For this, the first major UK exhibition of his work, large-scale drawings and paintings, archival documents, videos, photographs and wood-cuts, such as Untitled, 1983 (above ), are brought together, alongside an installation of fluorescent works from 1982 presented under UV light.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk/liverpool)
Until 10 November 2019.


LONDON
Nara: sacred images from early Japan

As part of the UK-Japan season of culture, Japan's Nara Prefecture, located at the eastern end of the silk routes, are loaning some stunning Buddhist and Shinto sacred images to the British Museum, where they will be display in two locations. Ranging in date from the AD 600s to the 1300s, the loans include works designated 'National Treasures' in Japan, shown alongside Japanese and Chinese paintings from the BM's own collection. Among the highlights are a pair of 8th-century wooden sculptures of Heavenly Kings from Tōshōdaiji temple, such as Heavenly King Virudhaka, AD 700s (above), and an 8th-century gilt bronze Libation dish, with Birth of the Buddha from Tōdaiji temple, thought to have been used at the dedication of the original Great Buddha.  
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
From 3 October to 24 November 2019.



LONDON

Inspired by the East: how the Islamic world influenced Western art
Exploring the relationship between 'East' and 'West' in art, this exhibition looks at five centuries of work from the Middle East, North Africa, Europe and North America. In a collaboration between the British Museum and the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia, who have loaned a number of works, the show pays close attention to the tradition of Orientalism, as exemplified by European artists, such as Delacroix, and also shows contemporary responses to Orientalist imagery by female artists from the Middle East and North Africa. Ceramics, photography, manuscripts, clothing, jewellery, glassware and portraits, such as A Portrait of Sultan Bayezid I, circa 1580, School of Veronese (1528–1588, above) are all on show.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
From 10 October to 26 January 2020.

LONDON
Rise of the Lionesses
Seventy years ago, the Women's Royal Army Corps (WRAC) was founded, but in 1992, it was disbanded when women were integrated into the rest of the army rather than requiring a separate unit. The WRAC Association, however, still remains and is this year celebrating its centenary. To mark this milestone, the WRAC Association, the first and only charity devoted to the care of female veterans and serving soldiers in the British Army, has partnered with the National Army Museum to bring to light this exhibition examining the role of women in the army since 1917. With objects including the first army-issue bra, the combat shirt and medical kit of Sergeant Chantelle Taylor (the first female British soldier to kill in combat), and the vehicle chassis used to train the future Queen Elizabeth II during the Second World War, this exhibition celebrates the major contributions women have made to the army and also considers how wider societal views of feminine roles have had an impact on their experiences.
National Army Museum
+44 (0)20 7730 0717
(www.nam.ac.uk)
Until 20 October 2019.



LONDON

Gauguin Portraits
Most of the paintings made by French artist Paul Gauguin are self-portraits, such as his Self Portrait with 'The Yellow Christ', 1890-1891 (above), which he produced throughout his career, from its beginning to his final visit to the South Seas, a region which fascinated him. For this, the first exhibition devoted to the artist's portraits, a number of his self-portraits have been brought together along with works depicting his family and friends (including two notable artists Vincent van Gogh and Meijer de Haan, with whom relations were particularly fraught) in paintings, ceramics, sculptures, prints, and drawings. As well as Tahiti, Brittany also played an important role in the artist's early work, although it is the French Polynesian island with which he is most closely associated. The exhibition sets out to explore the current debates surrounding the artist's relationship with the island and the impact of colonialism.
National Gallery
+44 0800 912 6958
(nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 7 October to 26 January 2020.


LONDON

Antony Gormley
This powerful solo show examines the work of the leading contemporary British sculptor Antony Gormley. It includes his work, from the 1970s to the present day, in organic and industrial materials, and also his ambitious installations which prompt visitors to consider the body, its own space, and its relationship to the space around it. Early, rarely exhibited works highlight his experimental beginnings, distinctive 'body case' sculptures, concrete creations, works on paper using crude oil, earth, and blood, and workbooks that chart the artist's pursuit of ideas will all be on show. Large scale works, which encourage visitors to engage with their own bodies and navigate the space, include: Lost Horizon I, 2008 (above), which positions 24 cast iron figures on the floor, on the walls and on the ceiling, forcing the viewer to challenge their perceptions; Clearing VII, 2019, which is made of kilometres of coiled aluminium tubing; and Host, 2019, in which a gallery is flooded with seawater and clay; this is the first UK presentation of this elemental work, which has only been exhibited three times since its initial conception in 1997.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
From 21 September to 3 December.


LONDON

Top Secret: From ciphers to cyber security
To mark the centenary of GCHQ, the Science Museum presents an exhibition that delivers insights into the secretive workings of the UK's Intelligence, Security, and Cyber agency. More than 100 objects and first-person interviews help tell the stories of people who keep us safe and chart the technological changes over the past centuries, leading to digital security challenges today. Second World War cipher machines, secure telephones, an encryption key used by the Queen, and a computer infected with WannaCry ransomware (which hit the NHS in 2017) are among the exhibits, while interactive puzzles give visitors the chance to test out their skills. Elsewhere in the Science Museum, the new gallery Science City 1550-1800 is opening on 12 September. Centring on London's role as a world city, a hub of trade, exploration and scientific endeavour, it brings together instruments such globes and microscopes, including one designed by Robert Hooke (above), explores how evidence was examined, and considers the relationship between science and the monarchy.
Science Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 4000
(www.sciencemuseum.ac.uk)
Until 23 February 2020.

LONDON
Playing with money: currency and games

Most families have played the boardgame Monopoly but it is only one of many 20th-century games that take money and the economy as their source material. This is shown in a new display at the British Museum. Among the historic games on show are Pit, which takes the stock exchange as its model, and Hunt the Coal Thief from wartime Germany, which tries to teach players about the impact of wasting resources.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
Until 29 September 2019.

LONDON
A Secret Beauty: The Spirit of Japanese Maki-e
For nearly 10,000 years, lacquer has been used in Japan to decorate and protect wooden, earthenware, bamboo and textile objects. This show explores the work of Koyanagi Tanekuni, who was born in Tokyo in 1944 and studied maki-e (lacquer sprinkled with gold or silver powder, an 8th-century technique), under three of Japan's 'Living National Treasures', a popular Japanese term for those individuals certified as 'Preservers of Important Intangible Cultural Properties'. Koyanagi has been instrumental in conservation in Japan, working on the Chuson-ji temple, and, for the past 50 years, creating exquisite traditional and contemporary lacquerwork.
Brunei Gallery, SOAS
+44 (0)20 7898 4915
(www.soas.ac.uk/gallery)
From 11 July to 21 September 2019.



LONDON

Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition
The story of the brilliant, meticulous American director Stanley Kubrick (1928–99) is told in this thrilling exhibition that explores his unique command of the creative design process of film-making, from storyteller to director to editor. Visitors can see, step-by-step, how Kubrick created genre-defining worlds in his ground-breaking films, and relive iconic scenes from 2001: A Space Odyssey (above), A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, Eyes Wide Shut. This show gives exclusive insight into Kubrick's mind through more than 700 rare objects, films, letters, interviews and photographs, that highlight his special relationship with England, particularly London, as his primary film location and a source of inspiration.
Design Museum
+44 (0)20 3862 5900
(designmuseum.org)
Until 15 September 2019.

LONDON
Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance

Known as El Bermejo (meaning 'reddish', probably referring to some aspect of his physical appearance), the 15th-century Spanish artist Bartolomé de Cárdenas created stunning works in oil paint, a technique probably learnt through studying Netherlandish paintings circulating in Spain at the time. This exhibition includes some of his exquisite religious compositions and puts forward the case for Bermejo's mastery of oils, surpassing his contemporaries in Spain. Highlights include the National Gallery's own Saint Michael Triumphant over the Devil with the Donor Antoni Joan, 1468 (above), on display again after a year of conservation, and the recently restored Desplà Pietà', 1490, which is on loan from Barcelona Cathedral and on show outside Spain for the first time.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 29 September 2019.




LONDON

Félix Vallotton
With around 100 paintings by Félix Vallotton (1865–1925), including a 1905 portrait of his wife Gabrielle (above) this exhibition takes the viewer on a journey through every period of this often overlooked Swiss artist's career, starting with his arrival in Paris at the age of 16 and his early rejection of Impressionism and other contemporary movements in favour of the Northern and Dutch Transitions. Another important episode was Vallotton's marriage to Gabrielle Rodrigues-Henriques, a wealthy widow who gave him the financial security to focus on painting instead of print-making. Vallotton's depictions of the female nude, paintings and prints made during the First World War, and landscapes and still-lifes are on view, as are his bold and at times satirical woodcut prints, some of which featured in magazines, including the cultural periodical La Revue blanche, where he worked as principal illustrator.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 29 September 2019.



LONDON

Queen Victoria's Palace
Marking the bicentenary of the birth of Queen Victoria, this year's exhibition at the summer opening of Buckingham Palace reveals how Victoria transformed the palace into what it is today. Only three weeks into her reign, in 1837 Victoria moved into the unfinished palace and she made it a family home and the headquarters of the monarchy. Buckingham Palace played host to grand balls and important events throughout her reign. Highlights include the queen's costume for the Stuart Ball in 1851, designed by the artist Eugène Lami, and The Ballroom, Buckingham Palace (above), a watercolour by Louis Haghe, which records a ball held to mark the end of the Crimean War shortly after the inauguration of the ballroom in 1856. This painting provides the only surviving depiction of the ballroom's original decorative scheme, influenced by the Italian Renaissance and designed by Ludwig Gruner (1801–82). 
State Rooms, Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)20 7766 7300
(www.rct.uk)
From 20 July to 29 September 2019.

LONDON
Young Wellington in India

The military exploits of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769–1852), against Napoleon secured him lasting fame, but details of the early career of the young Arthur Wellesley are less well-known. This exhibition looks at his time as a 27-year-old colonel in India, where his older brother Richard served as Governor-General. Portraits painted both before he set sail for India – such as one, circa 1804, made by John Hoppner (above) – and after he returned to England, are on show, alongside a selection of drawings of his military colleagues and friends, and some of the books Wellesley purchased to educate himself about India. On public view for the first time is the spectacular Deccan Dinner Service, which is formally laid out on a banqueting table in the Waterloo Gallery. Made in London, this silver gilt service was paid for with money raised by officers who fought with Wellesley in the Deccan region during the Second Anglo-Maratha Wars.
Apsley House
+44 (0)20 7499 5676
(www.wellingtoncollection.co.uk)
Until 3 November 2019.



MILTON KEYNES
George Stubbs: 'all done from Nature'

A self-taught painter, printmaker, and draughtsman, the 18th-century artist George Stubbs was also a fine anatomist, engaging in an intense 18-month period of dissection and classification, during which he produced a finished study for 'The Fourth Anatomical Table of the Muscles... of the Horse', 1756-1758 (above). Stubbs is known for his accurate, masterful studies of horses, exemplified in Whistlejacket, 1762, his most famous work, but he also studied human anatomy and had a keen interest in newly discovered animals across the globe, as seen in the range of paintings, prints and drawings on display here.
MK Gallery
+44(0)1908 676900
www.mkgallery.org
From 12 October to 26 January 2020.


MILTON KEYNES
Paula Rego: Obedience and Defiance

Spanning the entire length of the London-based artist Paula Rego's career, from the 1960s onwards, this exhibition brings together more than 80 paintings, pastels, drawings, and prints that demonstrate her powerful responses to political and other injustices. With no definitive explanations, paintings such as Angel, 1998 (above) often hint at abuse and vengeance, and can be disturbing. Rego draws from memories of her childhood in Portugal and also engages with pressing social issues, addressing subjects such as the Iraq War, abortion, female genital mutilation and the 1932–1968 dictatorship of António de Oliveira Salazar. After its run at the recently reopened MK Gallery, the exhibition will travel to the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh (23 November 2019–26 April 2020), and then on to the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin.
(25 May–1 November 2020).
MK Gallery
+44(0)1908 676900
www.mkgallery.org
Until 22 September 2019.

NORWICH
Magdalene Odundo: The Journey of Things

For her burnished ceramics, Magdalene Odundo has drawn inspiration from traditions across the world, stretching back some 3,000 years. In the artist's quest to learn more about ceramic arts and crafts, she has travelled widely, to Africa – Kenya, Uganda and Nigeria – to Asia, to Central America, and to Europe. These journeys have made their mark on Odundo's own visual language and her resulting large, often asymmetrical, vessels, with their striking silhouettes that evoke human forms and vivid orange or smooth black finishes. Pieces by Odundo are show with objects chosen for their role in the development of her work. One highlight is Transition II, the artist's largest work, which consists of 1001 suspended pieces of glass and is redesigned for each new venue in which it is exhibited.
Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
+44 (0)1603 593199
(scava.ac.uk)
Until 15 December 2019.


NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
Victoria & Albert: Our Lives in Watercolour

Another exhibition commemorating the 200th anniversary of the birth of both Queen Victoria and her consort, Prince Albert, this touring show of watercolours is from the Royal Collection commissioned, acquired, or even produced by the couple. The works from their personal albums include depictions of christenings and birthday parties, records of their homes, and views from their foreign travels. A few watercolours painted by Victoria herself are also on display, including one of her son Prince Arthur at the age of three at Osborne House in 1853 (above). The exhibition will also be on show at Poole Museum (26 October 2019–5 January 2020) and Wolverhampton Art Gallery.
(7 March–31 May 2020).
Laing Art Gallery
+44 (0)191 278 1611
(laingartgallery.org.uk)
Until 15 September 2019.

OXFORD
Significant historical maps, maps of imaginary worlds, and maps by contemporary artists, Grayson Perry and Layla Curtis, have been brought together in a celebration of cartographic creation, which includes fine examples from the Bodleian's own outstanding collection of more than 1.5 million maps. This exhibition explores the ways that maps – made out of many different media including tapestry and sticks of wood – can be used, whether to administer cities, deceive attackers, draw national boundaries, or show the way to religious salvation. Highlights include: the late 14th-century Gough Map, the earliest surviving map of a recognisable Great Britain; a Tibetan Buddhist thangka (above) showing the Wheel of Life with the worlds of gods, demons and men, all held in the claws of all-devouring Time; and al-Idrīsī's beautiful world map, of 1154, which makes use of Islamic cosmology and geography.
Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until 8 March 2020.

OXFORD
Thinking 3D: From Leonardo to the Present

The challenge of capturing the three-dimensional on the two-dimensional surface of a page is one that has faced both artists and scientists. This is one of many shows that are being held to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, and it looks at how people have approached this challenge over the past five centuries. Drawings by Leonardo are on show, as well as the first printed illustration of a many-sided icosidodecahedron from the Divina Proportione, 1509, the only book that he illustrated. The exhibition charts how new technologies, such as the printing press, photography, stereoscopy and 3-D modelling, have helped develop ideas in anatomy, architecture, astronomy and geometry. Other highlights include anatomical books with flaps and pop-up elements, Galileo's illustrations on the moon based on his observations through a telescope in 1609, and the first geological map of Mars, made using data from NASA's 1971–72 Mariner 9 mission.
Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until February 2020.

WADDESDON
Brought to Life: Eliot Hodgkin Rediscovered

As well as an accomplished painter of still lifes and landscapes, Eliot Hodgkin (1905–87) was also a portraitist, an avid collector and a novelist. He worked mainly in oils and tempera, capturing such natural objects, such as radishes, feathers, dead leaves and lemons (One Lemon Quartered, 1972 is pictured above), and also London scenes, with remarkable precision. This major retrospective takes a closer look at Hodgkin through a selection of nearly 100 of his paintings and drawings, including a series of a dozen fruit and flower compositions, called The Months made in 1950–51. Many of these works come from private collections and have not been on public display before; some are still held by the families of their original owners. Among Hodgkin's admirers are Lord Rothschild and the late property developer and collector Harry Hyams, who acquired the artist's work for his Wiltshire home, Ramsbury Manor, which is reported to be in the process of becoming a national art gallery. Objects used by Hodgkin, including feathers, baskets, snail shells, seedcases, ceramics and an oil-can, are also on show alongside his apron, brushes, and a list of his tempera paintings and who had commissioned them, all giving an insight into his work.
Waddesdon Manor
+44 (0)1296 820414
(www.waddesdon.org.uk)
From 25 May to 20 October 2019.

WADDESDON
Madame de Pompadour in the Frame

Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild purchased François Boucher's 1756 portrait of Madame de Pompadour in 1887. Either before this, or very shortly afterwards, the portrait was reframed, with an 18th-century frame that had a later, 19th-century cartouche and decorative elements added to match the floral motifs on Madame de Pompadour's dress. When Baron Rothschild died in 1898, he left the portrait to his brother Nathaniel. The canvas then made its way to Germany, to the Alte Pinakothek in Munich, but the frame did not go with it, it remained at Waddesdon. Now, collaborating with Factum Foundation, 3-D digital reproduction technology and traditional restoration techniques have been used to present the famous portrait as Baron Ferdinand intended it to be seen. A facsimile of the portrait will be placed inside the newly conserved frame. Another work exploring the connection between the Madame de Pompadour portrait and the Rothschilds is Charles-Germain de Saint-Aubin, La verite Surmonte l'Autorité, 1757, a wicked caricature by Germain de Saint-Aubin that shows Boucher as the Devil painting his flattering portrait (above). This was also bought by Ferdinand de Rothschild as part of a collection of rare 18th-century French books.
Waddesdon Manor
+44 (0)1296 820414
(www.waddesdon.org.uk)
From 25 May to 27 October 2019.

WAKEFIELD
Yorkshire Sculpture International

Artists from around the world take part in the Hepworth Wakefield's exhibition as part of Yorkshire Sculpture International. New commissions will be on view, and diverse works by international sculptors presented in the UK for the first time. The overarching theme for the show is 'truth to materials', and it explores the ways in which the artists exhibited approach this idea and the relationship between the chosen material and sculptural form. Highlights include: Jimmie Durham's recent works in dialogue with early pieces by Barbara Hepworth, Henry Moore and Ronald Moody; a new installation by Wolfgang Laib (above; he is installing Unlimited Ocean at School of the Art Institute of Chicago) who uses natural material such as rice and pollen; and a sculptural series by Berlin-based Nairy Baghramian, which chimes with the architecture of the gallery.
The Hepworth Wakefield
+44 (0)1924 247360
(www.hepworthwakefield.org)
From 22 June to 29 September 2019.

UNITED STATES


CLEVELAND, OHIO
Michelangelo: Mind of the Master

A genius among the draughtsmen of the Renaissance, Michelangelo employed drawing as a vital part of his creative process and used it to particularly great effect in his expression of the human form. The artist burned large quantities of his drawings, but luckily a number still survive. Since 1791, the Teylers Museum in Haarlem has held a collection of these drawings, which came from the collection of Queen Christina of Sweden (1626-1689), who abdicated the throne and moved to Rome. Exquisite drawings, some in red chalk, such as Seated male nude; separate study of his right arm, 1511, (above) loaned from this collection, form the centrepiece of the show, which has been organised by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the J Paul Getty Museum (where it will be from 25 February–7 June 2020) in conjunction with the Teylers Museum. The drawings on display reflect Michelangelo's range as a painter, sculptor, and architect, and include designs for some of his most famous projects, such as the Sistine Chapel, the cupola of Saint Peter's Basilica and the Medici Chapel tombs.
Cleveland Museum of Art
+1 216-421-7350
(www.clevelandart.org)
From 22 September to 5 January 2020.

HOUSTON, Texas
The Graphic Work of Dorothea Tanning

From 1950 and 2001, Dorothea Tanning created more than 100 graphic works – illustrated books and prints – that reflect her range of approaches to form, from representation to abstraction, and her experiments with lithography, etching and aquatint that she used to create different visual textures. The Menil Collection now has a complete set of Tanning's graphic works, thanks to a recent gift from Barbara and Jim Metcalf, and is exhibiting her works on paper, as well as her sculpture Cousins, 1970, to examine this aspect of her output, which shares some motifs, such as embracing figures, with her paintings and sculptures, and responds to similar themes like ecstasy, anxiety and obsession.
The Menil Collection
+1 713-525-9400
(www.menil.org)
Until 13 October 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

Fashion designer Pierre Cardin (now 97 years old) is well known for the bold, futuristic, Space Age clothing that he created during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, but as this expansive retrospective – drawn primarily from the couturier's archive – sets out to show, his work extends far beyond fashion into furniture, industrial design, and more. Among the highlights are garments from the 1964 Cosmocorps collection, pieces in the self-named Cardine synthetic fabric, and distinctive unisex full-knit bodysuits layered with skirts, vests and bibs.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718-638-5000
(brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 5 January 2020.

NEW YORK, New York
The Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximilian I
In commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the death of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I (1459-1519), this major exhibition examines the part that armour played in his life and ambitions. Through outstanding examples of European armour, paintings, sculptures, tapestries, stained glass, toys, and more, visitors will learn about the importance of armour at the dawn of the Renaissance, the leader's great dynastic plans, and the role of chivalry. One highlight is the recently conserved complete series of 18 sandstone reliefs commissioned by Maximilian for his residence in Innsbruck, which are leaving their home city for the first time.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212-535-7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 7 October to 5 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Rembrandt to Picasso: Five Centuries of European Works on Paper

Brooklyn Museum has collected European works on paper for more than 100 years and ranging over five centuries of European art history. More than 120 works from the holdings – including complete compositions and preliminary sketches, portraits, landscapes and satirical scenes – are on display, many for the first time. Between Rembrandt and Picasso are a diverse range of artists, including William Blake, Albrecht Dürer, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Francisco Goya, Vincent van Gogh, William Hogarth, Giovanni Battista Piranesi and Käthe Kollwitz.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718-638-5000
(brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 13 October 2019.


NEW YORK, New York
Apollo's Muse: The Moon in the Age of Photography 
Fifty years ago, millions of people around the world watched the first Moon Landing. Now, visitors to the Met can see exceptional images captured by Soviet and American lunar expeditions in an exhibition that explores our long enduring fascination with the moon. Images from the early days of photography include two newly discovered daguerreotypes from the 1840s, thought to be the earliest surviving photographs of the moon, and there are also images taken by pioneers of astronomical and night photography, such as John Adams Whipple (1822–1891). His picture of The Moon, 1857–60 (above) is a salted paper print from a glass negative. There are also artworks created after 1969 by artists such as Aleksandra Mir, Robert Rauschenberg, and Penelope Umbrico. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org) From 3 July to 22 September 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy
Discovered within the walls of a house in Colmar, northeastern France, in 1863, a small set of exquisite jewellery belonging to a single family tells the story of their changing fortunes in the tumultuous 14th century. The Colmar Treasure (on loan from Musée de Cluny in Paris) consists of more than 300 coins, gilded buttons, brooches, an enamelled belt, fine rings with sapphire, ruby, garnet, turquoise and onyx, and a Jewish ceremonial wedding ring (above). As the richness of these items attest, Colmar's Jewish community once thrived but, when the plague devastated the area in 1348-49, it was scapegoated and they were put to death. Related works from other collections look at the role of Jewish communities in medieval Europe.
The Met Cloisters
+1 212 923 3700
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 22 July 2019 to 12 January 2020.


NEW YORK, New York
I n Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met

Since the early days of the Met, Dutch Golden Age paintings have been an important feature of the museum's collection. Stunning 17th-century paintings by the likes of Rembrandt, Hals and Vermeer were part of the Met's founding purchase in 1871, and the museum has since acquired many more. Some 67 works from the permanent collections are on show, demonstrating both the refined skill of the Dutch artists and illustrating the key concerns of the day, such as religion. Landscapes, portraits, still lifes, and comic scenes all appear, as do paintings of women observed in everyday domestic settings, a major theme in 17th-century Dutch art best exemplified by Vermeer. Rembrandt is central to the exhibition, and his influence on his students, and other artists, is explored. Rembrandt's Portrait of Gerard de Lairesse, 1665–67, is juxtaposed alongside Lairesse's Apollo and Aurora, 1671 (above), which evoke some of the tensions between realism and idealism at the time.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 4 October 2020.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
Lisa Reihana: in Pursuit of Venus [infected]

New Zealand artist Lisa Reihana's extraordinary, nearly 25m-long panoramic video work in Pursuit of Venus [infected], 2015–17 (detail, above) has just been acquired as part of the de Young museum's contemporary art programme. Reihana's digital scroll challenges the romanticised view of European explorations in Polynesia as presented in Joseph Dufour's early 19th-century French scenic wallpaper Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique (Native Peoples of the South Pacific). Instead, she offers a more complex approach to cultural identity and colonialism. For this, the first display of the work in the continental United States, Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique wallpaper and an 18th-century folio with scenes of Captain Cook's exploits in the Pacific Ocean will also be on view.
de Young museum
+1 415-750-3600
(deyoungmuseum.org)
From 10 August 2019 to 5 January 2020.



WASHINGTON DC
Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence

Andrea del Verrocchio was a versatile and innovative painter and sculptor in Renaissance Florence who counted among his pupils Leonardo, Pietro Perugino, and likely Sandro Botticelli. He had a tremendous influence on the development of later Italian art and was able to deftly handle a variety of media – oil paint, bronze, clay, metalpoint, chalk, and pen and ink. Featuring the latest technical research into the artist's materials and techniques, this exhibition explores an impressive array of Verrocchio's masterful paintings, drawings and sculpture, such as Alexander the Great, circa 1480–85, in Carrara marble (above ).
to highlight his versatility.
National Gallery of Art
+1 202-842-6511
(www.nga.gov)
From 15 September to
12 January 2020.

WASHINGTON DC
Whistler in Watercolor

James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) created many small marketable works in watercolour over a period of about 15 years from 1881. Charles Lang Freer, the founder of the Freer Gallery, collected many, establishing the world's largest collection of his fellow American's watercolours. These fragile works are rarely displayed. They include seascapes, nocturnes, street scenes, and images of the home and studio, some of which have recently been studied by the museum's researchers, adding new information about Whistler's materials and methods. Many of his watercolours, such as Southend Pier 1882-4 (above), show daily life. To coincide with this exhibition, blue-and-white Chinese porcelain has been placed on the shelves of the Freer's Peacock Room. This was originally the dining-room of shipping magnate Frederick Leyland's London townhouse. When Whistler painted the panels of the Kensington room in blue and gold, it held fine Kangxi period porcelain, and so reinstating similar pieces of Kangxi ware (and introducing related contemporary porcelains) for the ongoing display The Peacock Room, in Blue and White helps conjure up the artist's own vision for the ornate interior.
Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian
+1 202 633 1000
(www.freersackler.si.edu)
Until 6 October 2019.

DENMARK


COPENHAGEN
Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory

Working in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, French painter Pierre Bonnard (1867–1947) often created his colourful compositions from memory, detaching himself temporally from his subjects. Organised in close collaboration with Tate Modern where it was on view earlier this year, this show explores his compositions and use of perspective, which can be as striking as his dynamic use of colour. With intimate domestic scenes, such as Nude in the Interior, 1935 (above ), unconventional landscapes and other works (some accompanied by a soundscape), the exhibition considers Bonnard's place in the history of modern art, a place that has been hotly debated.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
Until 22 September 2019.

FRANCE
PARIS
Trees

Trees are a vital part of the world's ecosystem and are impressive organisms that can influence the climate, are capable of sensory perception and communication skills, and in some cases live for thousands of years. This exhibition, which is one of several in recent years to focus on ecological issues and humanity's relationship with nature at the Fondation Cartier, takes a closer look at these wonderful plants, their beauty and their incredible biology. Films, scientific imagery, photographs, sound installations and works by contemporary artists offer new insights into trees as they become increasingly at risk.
Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain
+33 1 42 18 56 50
(www.fondationcartier.com)
Until 10 November 2019.

PARIS
The Alana Collection: Masterpieces of Italian Painting
Works such as Lippi's Saint Ubald et saint Frediano, 1496 (above) are in the Alana Collection, which was built up by Alvaro Saieh and Ana Guzmán and is currently housed in the USA. It has never been publicly exhibited, but it holds an impressive set of Italian works, from 13th-century paintings to Caravaggesque compositions. Paintings, sculptures, and objets d'art – including works by Fra Angelico, Lippi, Bellini, Tintoretto, Veronese, and Orazio Gentileschi – are on loan to the Musée Jacquemart-André, where they provide an ample overview of the riches of the private collection.
Musée Jacquemart-André
+33 1 45 62 11 59
(www.musee-jacquemart-andre.com)
From 13 September to
20 January 2020.

PARIS
Tutankhamun, Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh

The most spectacular archaeological discovery of the 20th century was undoubtedly that of Tutankhamun's tomb, which was full of 'wonderful things' in the words of Egyptologist Howard Carter who found it in 1922. Now, more than 150 of these truly 'wonderful things' are going on show in Paris, for an impressive display that not only highlights their exquisite beauty and craftsmanship, but also sets out to explain their ritual significance. Gold jewellery, sculpture and ceremonial artefacts help trace Tutankhamun's journey from death into everlasting life. More than 50 of the artefacts are on view for the first time outside Egypt.
Grande Halle de la Villette
+33 1 40 03 75 75
(expo-toutankhamon.fr)
From 23 March to 15 September 2019.

GERMANY


BERLIN
Strong Figures: Greek Portraits from Antiquity

Greek portraits of specific, real individuals have had a profound impact on Western art history, influencing traditions of portraiture today. These ancient portraits did not have to be true to life, and they often carried inscriptions identifying their subjects, who appear according to cultural types, with their age, status and affiliation. Marble portrait busts of poets, philosophers, kings and queens, such as Portrait of Queen Berenice II of Egypt who reigned in 246-221 BC (above), and figures of state are on view with reliefs, vases paintings (including a unique Attic painting of the poet Sappho), and other artefacts, which cast light on the tension between socials ideals and the portrayal of real figures.
Altes Museum
+49 30 266424242
(www.smb.museum)
Until 2 February 2020.


BONN
Goethe: Transformation of the World

Works of theatre, film, paintings, sculpture, music and photography reveal the remarkable and diverse legacy of writer Johann Wolfgang Goethe (1749–1832). They help chart the events of his life: his upbringing in Germany and his travels to Italy, as seen in Johann Heinrich Schilbach's View Across the Forum Romanum to the Capitol, 1825 (above), his significant body of travel writing, novels (including his 1774 cult hero in The Sorrows of Young Werther), poetry and art treatises, that helped shape the view of the world that coloured the 18th and 19th centuries.
Bundeskunsthalle
+49 228 91710
(www.bundeskunsthalle.de)
Until 15 September 2019.


WEIMAR
The Bauhaus comes from Weimar

As the art world celebrates 100 years of the Bauhaus, a new museum devoted to Walter Gropius' influential art and design school opens its doors in its home-town of Weimar. This permanent exhibition draws on a collection of Bauhaus works begun by Gropius in the 1920s with pieces selected from 13,000 objects that trace the development of the school and invite the visitor to consider the question Gropius put: 'How do we want to live together?' Works include a slatted chair by Marcel Breuer, furniture by Mies van der Rohe, and Dragonjar (above) by the ceramicist Wilhelm Löber's (1903–81).
Bauhaus Museum Weimar
+49 3643 545400
(www.klassik-stiftung.de/bauhaus-museum-weimar/)
Ongoing.

 

GREECE


ATHENS
Picasso and Antiquity: Line and Clay

Picasso drew inspiration from the ancient Greek world, its art, and its myths, particularly the Minotaur. Ceramics and drawings by Picasso, which are brought together for this exhibition where they are displayed in dialogue with ancient artefacts. For instance, Picasso's Woman, 1949, is shown side-by-side with a 3rd-century AD marble statue of Aphrodite from the agora of Athens (above). The ancient works reflect what Picasso might have seen in his travels in the Mediterranean, in museums across Europe, or in the books he read, and are divided, along with the modern artist's works, into prominent themes including Arcadia, Dionysus, the Centaur, the Minotaur and Lysistrata, Aristophanes' bawdy comedy about sex and war.
Museum of Cycladic Art
+30 210 7228321-3
(www.cycladic.gr)
Until 20 October 2019.

ITALY
VINCI
The origins of Genius: Leonardo

Leonardo's hometown of Vinci is well-known by name, but what influence did it have on the young man? This show, a collaboration with the Uffizi Galleries with loans from the State Archives of Florence, sets out to demonstrate Leonardo's ties with the town as he developed both as an artist and a scientist through a selection of his early works. His first known drawing, Landscape, dated 5 August 1473, is one highlight. The scene includes water, and the show also considers Leonardo's interest in and projects involving this natural feature, such as canals and water-powered machines.
Museo Leonardiano
(www.museoleonardiano.it)
Until 15 October 2019.

NETHERLANDS


AMSTERDAM
Jewels! Glittering at the Russian Court

For the second jubilee exhibition celebrating 10 years of the Hermitage's Amsterdam outpost, a dazzling array
of jewels have left St Petersburg. These include stunning work by Cartier, Lalique, Tiffany and Fabergé and a fabulous late 18th–early 19th-century gold and silver watch, decorated with enamel, glass, pearls, by Léonard Bordier (below left). There are also portraits of Catherine the Great and other royal family members, ball-gowns, and imperial costumes that reflect the glittering world of Russian high society over two centuries.
Hermitage Amsterdam
+31 20 530 8755
(hermitage.nl)
From 14 September to
15 March 2020.

DEN BOSCH
Van Gogh's Inner Circle: Family, Friends and Models

Van Gogh's relationships – at times turbulent and fraught – are a subject of great interest to many. This exhibition, which includes his private letters and documents, as well as paintings, drawings and sketchbooks, delves into the artist's family relations, love-affairs, and friendships with artists like Paul Gauguin, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Paul Signac, and Emile Bernard. Special attention is given to Van Gogh's bond with his brother Theo, and the exhibits include, touchingly, condolence letters sent to Theo by Camille Pissarro, Toulouse-Lautrec and Gauguin, as well as intimate still lifes and portraits, such as Still life with Bible, 1885, and Madame Roulin Rocking the Cradle (La Berceuse) 1889 (above).
Het Noordbrabants Museum
+31 73 687 7877
(www.hetnoordbrabantsmuseum.nl)
From 21 September to
12 January 2020.

DELFT
Pieter de Hooch in Deft: From the shadow of Vermeer

Working in the 17th-century, the Dutch painter Pieter de Hooch is often rather overshadowed by his contemporary Vermeer. This exhibition, the first retrospective in the Netherlands devoted to de Hooch centres on the paintings featuring splendid interiors and courtyards he produced in Delft between circa 1652 and 1660, Many on loan from leading European and American collections. They include The Mother, 1661–1663 (above).
Museum Prinsenhof Delft
+31 15 260 2358
(www.prinsenhof-delft.nl)
From 11 October to
16 February 2020.

SPAIN


BILBAO
Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold

The 20th-century artist Lucio Fontana is perhaps most easily recognised by his distinctive, later slashed canvases but this show looks back at his early works. Sculpture, paintings, ceramics and experimental environments, featuring neon tubes, such as Neon Structure for the Ninth Milan Triennial (Struttura al Neon per la IX Triennale di Milano), 1951/2019, (above) trace the artist's career from 1931 to 1968, the year of his death. Together they chart his shifts through various periods, revealing the influence of aesthetic currents and showing how he paved the way for installation and immersive art.
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.es)
Until 29 September 2019.

BILBAO
A Backward Glance: Giorgio Morandi and the Old Masters

Italian painter Giorgio Morandi (1890–1964) is best known for his delicate still lifes featuring everyday objects with a focus on form; such Still Life (Natura morta) 1955 (above). Aspects of these seemingly simple works draw inspiration from details of Old Masters, some of which are displayed here. El Greco's flowers, Zurbarán's light, and the geometry of Chardin's houses of cards – all inspired Morandi.
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.es)
Until 6 October 2019.

SANTANDER
Calder Stories

American artist Alexander Calder (1898–1976) is best known for his mobiles (kinetic sculptures), many of which were monumental commissions for public spaces. But this exhibition, produced in collaboration with New York's Calder Foundation, takes a look at an intriguing but much less familiar aspect of his career: his unrealised projects. These include public commissions such as his Untitled 1938, a maquette for the 1939 New York World's Fair (above). Some of his schemes were left unrealised at various stages throughout his career and some were interrupted by his death in 1976. Drawings and models for these uncompleted projects give glimpses of Calder's creative process and also of his collaborations with architects Oscar Niemeyer, Paul Nelson, Wallace K Harrison, Percival Goodman and the composer Harrison Kerr.
Centro Botín
+34 942 047 147
(www.centrobotin.org)
From 29 June to 20 October 2019.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
LONDON
Asian Art in London

Leading international dealers, auction houses, museums and other institutions celebrate the riches of Asian art in this annual event, with a programme which features exhibitions, auctions, lectures and receptions.
31 October to 9 November 2019
Multiple venues
(www.asianartinlondon.com)

PAD London
Galleries from around the world will gather together in Berkeley Square for the 13th edition of this art and design fair, bringing with them displays of the finest glass and ceramics, modern art, jewellery, and more.
30 September to 6 October 2019
Berkeley Square
(www.pad-fairs.com)

LONDON and MANCHESTER
Andante Study Days
Henry VIII
15 November 2019
Hampton Court Palace

Life and Death in Middle Egypt
Joyce Tyldesley
21 November 2019
University of Manchester
(www.andantetravels.co.uk)

OXFORD
Textile Art in the Graeco-Roman World

In this annual two-day workshop, the Classical Art Research Centre will investigate the visual imagery of textiles in the Graeco-Roman world, from archaic Greece to Late Antiquity. An important, but fragile, part of material culture, ancient textiles often survive only in fragments, but their depiction in other media can provide more information about them. Leading scholars will speak on a range of subjects including: Classical and Hellenistic furniture textiles; traces of Roman textiles from the Rhineland, and painted linen, Romano-Egyptian shrouds, such as this one (above right) from the 2nd century AD. The workshop is free and open to all, but places must be pre-booked by emailing carc@classics.ox.ac.uk. You should also check the website for updates to the programme.
26 to 27 September 2019
Ioannou Centre
(www.carc.ox.uk)



STOW-ON-THE-WOLD
Stow Art Week

The inaugural Stow Art Week features antiques, 20th-century watercolours and contemporary art. Participants include: 1793 Gallery offering modern works, such as Tracey Emin's tender watercolour, I carried your Ashes home, 2016 (above), and also paintings and works on paper dating from the Napoleonic Wars; Sam Wilson, with a loan exhibition of watercolours by John Nash; Christopher Clarke Antiques, exhibiting 18th- and 19th-century mica paintings from India. There will also be talks, workshops and exhibitions at the town's 10 galleries.
28 September to 6 October 2019
Multiple venues
(www.stowartweek.com)

FRANCE
PARIS
La Biennale Paris 2019

For its 31st edition, the annual (as of 2017) art fair La Biennale Paris returns to the Grand Palais, with leading exhibitors from around France and beyond bringing with them pieces that span a great stretch of art history. One of this year's participants, Galerie Claude Bernard, will present a show of recent watercolours and pastels by the French artist Sam Sazfran, who often depicts studios, stairs and plants.
13 to 17 September 2019
Grand Palais
(www.labiennaleparis.com/en/)

Fine Arts Paris
Now in its third edition, Fine Arts Paris encompasses a range of exhibitors, with 10 new galleries increasing the strength of its Old Master and modern painting sections, and introducing new areas, such as tapestries and antiquities. This year there will also be a special exhibition presented by La Piscine – Musée d'art et d'industrie André Diligent de Roubaix with highlights from its collection and an off-site event giving visitors the chance to look behind the scenes of some museums. On 14 November, Italian street artist Andrea Ravo Mattoni will create a special work at the fair.
13 to 17 November 2019
Carrousel de Louvre
(www.finearts-paris.com)

Parcours des Mondes
Dedicated to tribal art, Asian art, and antiquities, Parcours des Mondes brings together more than 60 exhibitors from around the world in Saint-Germain-des-Prés to give the impression of an open-air museum in the heart of Paris. For the 18th edition of the fair, galleries specialising in art from Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas will all
be taking part.
10 to 15 September 2019
Multiple venues in Saint-Germain-des-Prés
(www.parcours-des-mondes.com)







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